Functional Biomaterials for Biomedical Applications

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmaceutical Technology, Manufacturing and Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 6896

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Ophthalmology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA
Interests: translational nanomedicine; nanofabricated drug delivery systems; ocular drug delivery; ocular nanomedicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biomaterials with specific immuno- and inflammation modulatory attributes in synergy with therapeutics, biologics, and tissue systems are extremely useful within clinical translation. Current biomaterials are mainly developed as drug carriers or inert scaffolds in tissue culture systems without any intrinsic functional attributes. 

This Special Issue aims to introduce high-impact research articles focused on the development of functional biomaterials for specific disease therapy, drug delivery, and innate immune and inflammation modulatory systems. This Special Issue will compile high-impact research articles that guide the development of next-generation functional biomaterials. 

Dr. Ghanashyam S. Acharya
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • functional biomaterials
  • anti-inflammatory
  • antifibrotic
  • antiangiogenic
  • wound healing
  • fibrosis

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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19 pages, 8042 KiB  
Article
Nerve Regeneration with a Scaffold Incorporating an Absorbable Zinc-2% Iron Alloy Filament to Improve Axonal Guidance
by Tomer Ron, Avi Leon, Alon Kafri, Ahmed Ashraf, John Na, Ashvin Babu, Runima Banerjee, Hunter Brookbank, Saimahesh Raju Muddaluri, Kevin J. Little, Eli Aghion and Sarah Pixley
Pharmaceutics 2023, 15(11), 2595; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics15112595 - 07 Nov 2023
Viewed by 912
Abstract
Peripheral nerve damage that results in lost segments requires surgery, but currently available hollow scaffolds have limitations that could be overcome by adding internal guidance support. A novel solution is to use filaments of absorbable metals to supply physical support and guidance for [...] Read more.
Peripheral nerve damage that results in lost segments requires surgery, but currently available hollow scaffolds have limitations that could be overcome by adding internal guidance support. A novel solution is to use filaments of absorbable metals to supply physical support and guidance for nerve regeneration that then safely disappear from the body. Previously, we showed that thin filaments of magnesium metal (Mg) would support nerve regeneration. Here, we tested another absorbable metal, zinc (Zn), using a proprietary zinc alloy with 2% iron (Zn-2%Fe) that was designed to overcome the limitations of both Mg and pure Zn metal. Non-critical-sized gaps in adult rat sciatic nerves were repaired with silicone conduits plus single filaments of Zn-2%Fe, Mg, or no metal, with autografts as controls. After seventeen weeks, all groups showed equal recovery of function and axonal density at the distal end of the conduit. The Zn alloy group showed some improvements in early rat health and recovery of function. The alloy had a greater local accumulation of degradation products and inflammatory cells than Mg; however, both metals had an equally thin capsule (no difference in tissue irritation) and no toxicity or inflammation in neighboring nerve tissues. Therefore, Zn-2%Fe, like Mg, is biocompatible and has great potential for use in nervous tissue regeneration and repair. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Biomaterials for Biomedical Applications)
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17 pages, 9235 KiB  
Article
Comparison of Bovine- and Porcine-Derived Decellularized Biomaterials: Promising Platforms for Tissue Engineering Applications
by Hussein M. El-Husseiny, Eman A. Mady, Masahiro Kaneda, Kazumi Shimada, Yasumoto Nakazawa, Tatsuya Usui, Mohamed Elbadawy, Yusuke Ishihara, Moeko Hirose, Yohei Kamei, Ahmed S. Doghish, Hesham A. El-Mahdy, Walaa A. El-Dakroury and Ryou Tanaka
Pharmaceutics 2023, 15(7), 1906; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics15071906 - 08 Jul 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1896
Abstract
Animal-derived xenogeneic biomaterials utilized in different surgeries are promising for various applications in tissue engineering. However, tissue decellularization is necessary to attain a bioactive extracellular matrix (ECM) that can be safely transplanted. The main objective of the present study is to assess the [...] Read more.
Animal-derived xenogeneic biomaterials utilized in different surgeries are promising for various applications in tissue engineering. However, tissue decellularization is necessary to attain a bioactive extracellular matrix (ECM) that can be safely transplanted. The main objective of the present study is to assess the structural integrity, biocompatibility, and potential use of various acellular biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. Hence, a bovine pericardium (BP), porcine pericardium (PP), and porcine tunica vaginalis (PTV) were decellularized using a Trypsin, Triton X (TX), and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) (Trypsin + TX + SDS) protocol. The results reveal effective elimination of the cellular antigens with preservation of the ECM integrity confirmed via staining and electron microscopy. The elasticity of the decellularized PP (DPP) was markedly (p < 0.0001) increased. The tensile strength of DBP, and DPP was not affected after decellularization. All decellularized tissues were biocompatible with persistent growth of the adipose stem cells over 30 days. The staining confirmed cell adherence either to the peripheries of the materials or within their matrices. Moreover, the in vivo investigation confirmed the biocompatibility and degradability of the decellularized scaffolds. Conclusively, Trypsin + TX + SDS is a successful new protocol for tissue decellularization. Moreover, decellularized pericardia and tunica vaginalis are promising scaffolds for the engineering of different tissues with higher potential for the use of DPP in cardiovascular applications and DBP and DPTV in the reconstruction of higher-stress-bearing abdominal walls. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Biomaterials for Biomedical Applications)
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20 pages, 1308 KiB  
Article
Demonstrating the In Vitro and In Situ Antimicrobial Activity of Oxide Mineral Microspheres: An Innovative Technology to Be Incorporated into Porous and Nonporous Materials
by Katia Iskandar, Sophie Pecastaings, Céline LeGac, Sylvie Salvatico, Catherine Feuillolay, Mylène Guittard, Loïc Marchin, Marc Verelst and Christine Roques
Pharmaceutics 2023, 15(4), 1261; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics15041261 - 17 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1407
Abstract
The antimicrobial activity of surfaces treated with zinc and/or magnesium mineral oxide microspheres is a patented technology that has been demonstrated in vitro against bacteria and viruses. This study aims to evaluate the efficiency and sustainability of the technology in vitro, under simulation-of-use [...] Read more.
The antimicrobial activity of surfaces treated with zinc and/or magnesium mineral oxide microspheres is a patented technology that has been demonstrated in vitro against bacteria and viruses. This study aims to evaluate the efficiency and sustainability of the technology in vitro, under simulation-of-use conditions, and in situ. The tests were undertaken in vitro according to the ISO 22196:2011, ISO 20473:2013, and NF S90-700:2019 standards with adapted parameters. Simulation-of-use tests evaluated the robustness of the activity under worst-case scenarios. The in situ tests were conducted on high-touch surfaces. The in vitro results show efficient antimicrobial activity against referenced strains with a log reduction of >2. The sustainability of this effect was time-dependent and detected at lower temperatures (20 ± 2.5 °C) and humidity (46%) conditions for variable inoculum concentrations and contact times. The simulation of use proved the microsphere’s efficiency under harsh mechanical and chemical tests. The in situ studies showed a higher than 90% reduction in CFU/25 cm2 per treated surface versus the untreated surfaces, reaching a targeted value of <50 CFU/cm2. Mineral oxide microspheres can be incorporated into unlimited surface types, including medical devices, to efficiently and sustainably prevent microbial contamination. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Biomaterials for Biomedical Applications)
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Review

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37 pages, 2732 KiB  
Review
Revolutionizing Drug Delivery and Therapeutics: The Biomedical Applications of Conductive Polymers and Composites-Based Systems
by Sharanya Paramshetti, Mohit Angolkar, Adel Al Fatease, Sultan M. Alshahrani, Umme Hani, Ankitha Garg, Gundawar Ravi and Riyaz Ali M. Osmani
Pharmaceutics 2023, 15(4), 1204; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics15041204 - 10 Apr 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2162
Abstract
The first conductive polymers (CPs) were developed during the 1970s as a unique class of organic substances with properties that are electrically and optically comparable to those of inorganic semiconductors and metals while also exhibiting the desirable traits of conventional polymers. CPs have [...] Read more.
The first conductive polymers (CPs) were developed during the 1970s as a unique class of organic substances with properties that are electrically and optically comparable to those of inorganic semiconductors and metals while also exhibiting the desirable traits of conventional polymers. CPs have become a subject of intensive research due to their exceptional qualities, such as high mechanical and optical properties, tunable electrical characteristics, ease of synthesis and fabrication, and higher environmental stability than traditional inorganic materials. Although conducting polymers have several limitations in their pure state, coupling with other materials helps overcome these drawbacks. Owing to the fact that various types of tissues are responsive to stimuli and electrical fields has made these smart biomaterials attractive for a range of medical and biological applications. For various applications, including the delivery of drugs, biosensors, biomedical implants, and tissue engineering, electrical CPs and composites have attracted significant interest in both research and industry. These bimodalities can be programmed to respond to both internal and external stimuli. Additionally, these smart biomaterials have the ability to deliver drugs in various concentrations and at an extensive range. This review briefly discusses the commonly used CPs, composites, and their synthesis processes. Further highlights the importance of these materials in drug delivery along with their applicability in various delivery systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Biomaterials for Biomedical Applications)
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