Advanced Liposomes for Drug Delivery, 2nd Edition

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923). This special issue belongs to the section "Drug Delivery and Controlled Release".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 December 2024 | Viewed by 4345

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical Products, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Av. Antônio Carlos, 6627, Belo Horizonte 31270-901, MG, Brazil
Interests: nanogel; drug delivery systems; prodrugs; cisplatin; cancer treatment

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical Products, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antônio Carlos, 6627, Belo Horizonte 31270-901, Brazil
Interests: liposomes; physicochemical characterization; drug delivery systems; cancer; treatment; cardiotoxicty; tumor models
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical Products, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Minas Gerais, UFMG, Belo Horizonte 31270-901, Brazil
Interests: nanoparticles; drug delivery system; polymeric micelles; liposomes; theranostic; cancer; SAXS; peripheral neuropathy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Liposomes are phospholipid-based nanostructures discovered in the early 1960s; they have been extensively discussed as drug delivery systems since 1976. The approval of DOXILTM, a doxorubicin liposomal formulation, in 1995, encouraged researchers to reach better outcomes regarding the safety and therapeutic efficacy of liposomes. In the last several decades, liposomes with several lipid compositions and surface modifications, and with the most extensive list of different kinds of encapsulated molecules (e.g., drugs, peptides, antibodies, nucleic acids) have been reported for most types of applications. However, the versatility of liposomes and their key role in health care technology advances continue to encourage research groups to develop new liposomal formulations.

This Special Issue aims to present the new advances in liposome research and the current evidence of liposome use as drug delivery systems in the treatment and diagnosis of cancer, inflammation, or infectious disease.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Elaine Amaral Leite
Dr. Juliana De Oliveira Silva
Dr. Caroline Mari Ramos Oda
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmaceutics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • liposomes
  • lipid-based nanosystems
  • drug delivery systems
  • treatment
  • diagnosis
  • cancer
  • inflammatory diseases
  • infectious diseases

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

22 pages, 8692 KiB  
Article
Hybrid Nanosystem Formed by DOX-Loaded Liposomes and Extracellular Vesicles from MDA-MB-231 Is Effective against Breast Cancer Cells with Different Molecular Profiles
by Luiza Marques Paschoal Barbosa, Eliza Rocha Gomes, André Luis Branco de Barros, Geovanni Dantas Cassali, Andréa Teixeira de Carvalho, Juliana de Oliveira Silva, Ana Luiza Pádua and Mônica Cristina Oliveira
Pharmaceutics 2024, 16(6), 739; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics16060739 - 30 May 2024
Viewed by 271
Abstract
Drug delivery selectivity is a challenge for cancer treatment. A hybrid pegylated pH-sensitive liposome–extracellular vesicle isolated from human breast cancer cell MDA-MB-231 was developed to investigate its in vitro activity against breast cancer cells of different molecular profiles to overcome this inconvenience. The [...] Read more.
Drug delivery selectivity is a challenge for cancer treatment. A hybrid pegylated pH-sensitive liposome–extracellular vesicle isolated from human breast cancer cell MDA-MB-231 was developed to investigate its in vitro activity against breast cancer cells of different molecular profiles to overcome this inconvenience. The hybrid nanosystem was produced by film hydration, and doxorubicin (DOX) was encapsulated in this system using the ammonium sulfate gradient method. The characterization of this hybrid nanosystem revealed a mean diameter of 140.20 ± 2.70 nm, a polydispersity index of 0.102 ± 0.033, an encapsulation efficiency of doxorubicin of 88.9% ± 2.4, and a great storage stability for 90 days at 4 °C. The fusion of extracellular vesicles with liposomes was confirmed by nanoflow cytometry using PE-conjugated human anti-CD63. This hybrid nanosystem demonstrated cytotoxicity against human breast cancer cell lines with different molecular subtypes, enhanced anti-migration properties, and exhibited similar cellular uptake to the free DOX treatment. Preliminary acute toxicity assessments using Balb/C female mice indicated a median lethal dose of 15–17.5 mg/kg, with no evidence of splenic, liver, heart, bone marrow, and renal damage at a dose of 15 mg/kg. These findings suggest the hybrid formulation as a versatile nanocarrier for the treatment of various breast cancer subtypes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Liposomes for Drug Delivery, 2nd Edition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 3134 KiB  
Article
Vaccination with DC-SIGN-Targeting αGC Liposomes Leads to Tumor Control, Irrespective of Suboptimally Activated T-Cells
by Aram M. de Haas, Dorian A. Stolk, Sjoerd T. T. Schetters, Laura Goossens-Kruijssen, Eelco Keuning, Martino Ambrosini, Louis Boon, Hakan Kalay, Gert Storm, Hans J. van der Vliet, Tanja D. de Gruijl and Yvette van Kooyk
Pharmaceutics 2024, 16(5), 581; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics16050581 - 24 Apr 2024
Viewed by 786
Abstract
Cancer vaccines have emerged as a potent strategy to improve cancer immunity, with or without the combination of checkpoint blockade. In our investigation, liposomal formulations containing synthetic long peptides and α-Galactosylceramide, along with a DC-SIGN-targeting ligand, Lewis Y (LeY), were studied [...] Read more.
Cancer vaccines have emerged as a potent strategy to improve cancer immunity, with or without the combination of checkpoint blockade. In our investigation, liposomal formulations containing synthetic long peptides and α-Galactosylceramide, along with a DC-SIGN-targeting ligand, Lewis Y (LeY), were studied for their anti-tumor potential. The formulated liposomes boosted with anti-CD40 adjuvant demonstrated robust invariant natural killer (iNKT), CD4+, and CD8+ T-cell activation in vivo. The incorporation of LeY facilitated the targeting of antigen-presenting cells expressing DC-SIGN in vitro and in vivo. Surprisingly, mice vaccinated with LeY-modified liposomes exhibited comparable tumor reduction and survival rates to those treated with untargeted counterparts despite a decrease in antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. These results suggest that impaired induction of antigen-specific CD8+ T-cells via DC-SIGN targeting does not compromise anti-tumor potential, hinting at alternative immune activation routes beyond CD8+ T-cell activation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Liposomes for Drug Delivery, 2nd Edition)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

13 pages, 4613 KiB  
Article
Combination of the Topical Photodynamic Therapy of Chloroaluminum Phthalocyanine Liposomes with Fexinidazole Oral Self-Emulsifying System as a New Strategy for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Treatment
by Raphaela Ariany Silva, Danielle Soter Damasio, Larissa Dutra Coelho, Eliane de Morais-Teixeira, Celso M. Queiroz-Junior, Paulo Eduardo Souza, Ricardo Bentes Azevedo, Antônio Tedesco, Lucas Antônio Ferreira, Mônica Cristina Oliveira and Marta Gontijo Aguiar
Pharmaceutics 2024, 16(4), 509; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics16040509 - 7 Apr 2024
Viewed by 749
Abstract
Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a neglected tropical disease. The treatment is restricted to drugs, such as meglumine antimoniate and amphotericin B, that exhibit toxic effects, high cost, long-term treatment, and limited efficacy. The development of new alternative therapies, including the identification of effective [...] Read more.
Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a neglected tropical disease. The treatment is restricted to drugs, such as meglumine antimoniate and amphotericin B, that exhibit toxic effects, high cost, long-term treatment, and limited efficacy. The development of new alternative therapies, including the identification of effective drugs for the topical and oral treatment of CL, is of great interest. In this sense, a combination of topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) with chloroaluminum phthalocyanine liposomes (Lip-ClAlPc) and the oral administration of a self-emulsifying drug delivery system containing fexinidazole (SEDDS-FEX) emerges as a new strategy. The aim of the present study was to prepare, characterize, and evaluate the efficacy of combined therapy with Lip-ClAlPc and SEDDS-FEX in the experimental treatment of Leishmania (Leishmania) major. Lip-ClAlPc and SEDDS-FEX were prepared, and the antileishmanial efficacy study was conducted with the following groups: 1. Lip-ClAlPc (0.05 mL); 2. SEDDS-FEX (50 mg/kg/day); 3. Lip-ClAlPc (0.05 mL)+SEDDS-FEX (50 mg/kg/day) combination; 4. FEX suspension (50 mg/kg/day); and 5. control (untreated). BALB/c mice received 10 sessions of topical Lip-ClAlPc on alternate days and 20 consecutive days of SEDDS-FEX or FEX oral suspension. Therapeutical efficacy was evaluated via the parasite burden (limiting-dilution assay), lesion size (mm), healing of the lesion, and histological analyses. Lip-ClAlPc and SEDDS-FEX presented physicochemical characteristics that are compatible with the administration routes used in the treatments. Lip-ClAlPc+SEDDS-FEX led to a significant reduction in the parasitic burden in the lesion and spleen when compared to the control group (p < 0.05) and the complete healing of the lesion in 43% of animals. The Lip-ClAlPc+SEDDS-FEX combination may be promising for the treatment of CL caused by L. major. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Liposomes for Drug Delivery, 2nd Edition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

24 pages, 4593 KiB  
Article
Liposome-Based Drug Delivery Systems in Cancer Research: An Analysis of Global Landscape Efforts and Achievements
by Islam Hamad, Amani A. Harb and Yasser Bustanji
Pharmaceutics 2024, 16(3), 400; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics16030400 - 14 Mar 2024
Viewed by 2067
Abstract
Lipid-bilayer-based liposomes are gaining attention in scientific research for their versatile role in drug delivery. With their amphiphilic design, liposomes efficiently encapsulate and deliver drugs to targeted sites, offering controlled release. These artificial structures hold great promise in advancing cancer therapy methodologies. Bibliometric [...] Read more.
Lipid-bilayer-based liposomes are gaining attention in scientific research for their versatile role in drug delivery. With their amphiphilic design, liposomes efficiently encapsulate and deliver drugs to targeted sites, offering controlled release. These artificial structures hold great promise in advancing cancer therapy methodologies. Bibliometric research analyzes systematic literary data statistically. This study used bibliometric indicators to examine, map, and evaluate the applications of liposomes in cancer therapy. A Scopus search was conducted to identify all English-language peer-reviewed scientific publications on the applications of liposomes in cancer therapy within the past twenty years. Bibliometric indicators were calculated using VOSviewer and Biblioshiny. We produced thematic, conceptual, and visualization charts. A total of 14,873 published documents were obtained. The procedure of keyword mapping has effectively identified the main areas of research concentration and prevailing trends within this specific field of study. The significant clusters discovered through theme and hotspot analyses encompassed many topics such as the use of multiple strategies in chemotherapy and different forms of cancer, the study of pharmacokinetics and nanomedicine, as well as the investigation of targeted drug delivery, cytotoxicity, and gene delivery. Liposomes were employed as drug delivery systems so as to selectively target cancer cells and improve the bioavailability of anticancer drugs. The work showcased the capacity to tailor these liposomes for accurate drug delivery by including potent anticancer medications. Our findings not only bring attention to the latest progress in utilizing liposomes for cancer treatment but also underscore the vital need for ongoing research, collaborative efforts, and the effective translation of these breakthroughs into tangible clinical applications, emphasizing the dynamic and evolving nature of cancer therapeutics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Liposomes for Drug Delivery, 2nd Edition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop