Pharmacokinetics of Nanomedicines

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 1206

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Biomimetic Micro and Nanomedicine Unit (MINT), University of Angers, INSERM 1066, CNRS 6021, Angers CEDEX 9, France
Interests: biopharmacy; in vivo/in vitro models; cell culture; pharmacokinetics; PKPD; nanomedicine; cancer; oral delivery; lung delivery; brain delivery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As demonstrated by the recent progresses in vaccines and cancer therapy, nanomedicine could be viewed as a very promising strategy to significantly improve human health. The paradox is that the idea to use nanotechnology to enhance drug efficacy and tolerance was proposed more than 50 years ago; however, so few drug products have reached the market. One reason is that those drug delivery systems (DDS) are difficult to characterize and to produce at an industrial scale. One of the key features evaluated by drug agencies to approve new products is drug pharmacokinetics (i.e., absorption, distribution, metabolization and elimination of the drug from the body). Until very recently, the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of nanomedicines have been assessed using models initially designed for regular formulations. We now know that the fate of live organisms, of a nanoparticle encapsulating an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), has to be studied with specific models since it is modified as soon as it comes into contact with living tissues or liquid. In order to help more DDS to reach the market and improve human health, the present Special Issue will gather the latest studies on this subject.

Prof. Dr. Frederic Lagarce
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • nanomedicines
  • drug delivery systems
  • pharmacokinetics
  • PKPD
  • in vivo/in vitro models

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

15 pages, 3862 KiB  
Article
Ag- but Not ZnO-Nanoparticles Disturb the Airway Epithelial Barrier at Subtoxic Concentrations
by Helena Moratin, Anna Thöle, Josephine Lang, Totta Ehret Kasemo, Manuel Stöth, Rudolf Hagen, Agmal Scherzad and Stephan Hackenberg
Pharmaceutics 2023, 15(10), 2506; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics15102506 - 21 Oct 2023
Viewed by 884
Abstract
Inhalation is considered to be the most relevant source of human exposure to nanoparticles (NPs); however, only a few investigations have addressed the influence of exposing the respiratory mucosal barrier to subcytotoxic doses. In the nasal respiratory epithelium, cells of the mucosa represent [...] Read more.
Inhalation is considered to be the most relevant source of human exposure to nanoparticles (NPs); however, only a few investigations have addressed the influence of exposing the respiratory mucosal barrier to subcytotoxic doses. In the nasal respiratory epithelium, cells of the mucosa represent one of the first contact points of the human organism with airborne NPs. Disruption of the epithelial barrier by harmful materials can lead to inflammation in addition to potential intrinsic toxicity of the particles. The aim of this study was to investigate whether subtoxic concentrations of zinc oxide (ZnO)- and silver (Ag)-NPs have an influence on upper airway barrier integrity. Nasal epithelial cells from 17 donors were cultured at the air–liquid interface and exposed to ZnO- and Ag-NPs. Barrier function, quantified by transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), decreased after treatment with 10 µg/mL Ag-NPs, but FITC-dextran permeability remained stable and no change in mRNA levels of tight junction proteins and E-cadherin was detected by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). The results indicate that subtoxic concentrations of Ag-NPs may already induce damage of the upper airway epithelial barrier in vitro. The lack of similar disruption by ZnO-NPs of similar size suggests a specific effect by Ag-NPs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pharmacokinetics of Nanomedicines)
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