Development of Colon Targeted Drug Delivery System

A special issue of Pharmaceuticals (ISSN 1424-8247). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmaceutical Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 10577

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Medical Oncology Unit A, Umberto I University Hospital, Sapienza University, 00100 Rome, Italy
Interests: genito-urinary cancer; chemotherapy; target therapy
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Guest Editor
School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ulster University, Coleraine, Northern Ireland BT52 1SA, UK
Interests: free radicals; antioxidant activity; reproductive medicine; reactive oxygen species; oxidative stress biomarkers; free radical scavengers; pharmaceutical development; apoptosis; colorectal cancer; biomarkers

Special Issue Information

It is well known that targeting drugs to the site of action in the colon for the treatment of colonic diseases such as ulcerative colitis and colon cancer would result in better therapeutic outcomes, as well as reduced site effects. This approach can improve the quality of life of patients suffering from these chronic diseases.

The goal of this Special Issue is to publish research and review manuscripts detailing recent advances and developments in targeted drug delivery for the colon using novel approaches such as 3D printing, nanotechnology, novel tablet coating, liposomes, hydrogel, mini-capsules, and any other novel technology which can allow for effective colonic targeted drug delivery.

Dr. Murtaza. M. Tambuwala
Dr. Michela Roberto
Dr. Hamid Bakshi
Guest Editors

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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18 pages, 5543 KiB  
Article
Anticancer Drugs for Intra-Arterial Treatment of Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases: In-Vitro Screening after Short Exposure Time
by Audrey Fohlen, Karim Bordji, Eric Assenat, Céline Gongora, Céline Bazille, Jérémy Boulonnais, Mikaël Naveau, Cécile Breuil, Elodie A. Pérès, Myriam Bernaudin and Boris Guiu
Pharmaceuticals 2021, 14(7), 639; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph14070639 - 01 Jul 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3148
Abstract
To treat colorectal liver metastases, intra-arterial chemotherapies may complete therapeutic arsenal. Drugs using intra-arterially are very heterogeneous. The aim of this study was to select the most efficient drug on a panel of colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines (Caco-2, HCT 116, HT 29, [...] Read more.
To treat colorectal liver metastases, intra-arterial chemotherapies may complete therapeutic arsenal. Drugs using intra-arterially are very heterogeneous. The aim of this study was to select the most efficient drug on a panel of colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines (Caco-2, HCT 116, HT 29, SW 48, SW 480, SW 620) exposed for 30 min to 12 cytotoxic agents (doxorubicin, epirubicin, idarubicin, 5-FU, raltitrexed, gemcitabine, cisplatin, oxaliplatin, mitomycin C, irinotecan, streptozocin, paclitaxel) at different concentrations. The effect on cell viability was measured using the WST-1 cell viability assay. For each drug and cell line, the IC50 and IC90 were calculated, which respectively correspond to the drug concentration (mg/mL) required to obtain 50% and 90% of cell death. We also quantified the cytotoxic index (CyI90 = C Max/IC90) to compare drug efficacy. The main findings of this study are that idarubicin emerged as the most cytotoxic agent to most of the tested CRC cell lines (Caco-2, HT29, HCT116, SW620 and SW480). Gemcitabine seemed to be the most efficient chemotherapy for SW48. Interestingly, the most commonly used cytotoxic agents in the systemic and intra-arterial treatment of colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM) (oxaliplatin, 5-FU, irinotecan) showed very limited cytotoxicity to all the cell lines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Development of Colon Targeted Drug Delivery System)
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12 pages, 1080 KiB  
Article
Drug–Drug Interactions and Pharmacogenomic Evaluation in Colorectal Cancer Patients: The New Drug-PIN® System Comprehensive Approach
by Michela Roberto, Alessandro Rossi, Martina Panebianco, Leda Marina Pomes, Giulia Arrivi, Debora Ierinò, Maurizio Simmaco, Paolo Marchetti and Federica Mazzuca
Pharmaceuticals 2021, 14(1), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph14010067 - 15 Jan 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2886
Abstract
Drug–drug interactions (DDIs) can affect both treatment efficacy and toxicity. We used Drug-PIN® (Personalized Interactions Network) software in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients to evaluate drug–drug–gene interactions (DDGIs), defined as the combination of DDIs and individual genetic polymorphisms. Inclusion criteria were: (i) stage [...] Read more.
Drug–drug interactions (DDIs) can affect both treatment efficacy and toxicity. We used Drug-PIN® (Personalized Interactions Network) software in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients to evaluate drug–drug–gene interactions (DDGIs), defined as the combination of DDIs and individual genetic polymorphisms. Inclusion criteria were: (i) stage II-IV CRC; (ii) ECOG PS (Performance status sec. Eastern coperative oncology group) ≤2; (iii) ≥5 concomitant drugs; and (iv) adequate renal, hepatic, and bone marrow function. The Drug-PIN® system analyzes interactions between active and/or pro-drug forms by integrating biochemical, demographic, and genomic data from 110 SNPs. We selected DDI, DrugPin1, and DrugPin2 scores, resulting from concomitant medication interactions, concomitant medications, and SNP profiles, and DrugPin1 added to chemotherapy drugs, respectively. Thirty-four patients, taking a median of seven concomitant medications, were included. The median DrugPin1 and DrugPin2 scores were 42.6 and 77.7, respectively. In 13 patients, the DrugPin2 score was two-fold higher than the DrugPin1 score, with 7 (54%) of these patients experiencing severe toxicity that required hospitalization. On chi-squared testing for any toxicity, a doubled DrugPin2 score (p = 0.001) was significantly related to G3–G4 toxicity. Drug-PIN® software may prevent severe adverse events, decrease hospitalizations, and improve survival in cancer patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Development of Colon Targeted Drug Delivery System)
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Review

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14 pages, 1004 KiB  
Review
Exploiting the Metabolism of the Gut Microbiome as a Vehicle for Targeted Drug Delivery to the Colon
by Hamid A. Bakshi, Gerry A. Quinn, Alaa A. A. Aljabali, Faruck L. Hakkim, Rabia Farzand, Mohamed M. Nasef, Naji Abuglela, Prawej Ansari, Vijay Mishra, Ángel Serrano-Aroca and Murtaza M. Tambuwala
Pharmaceuticals 2021, 14(12), 1211; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph14121211 - 23 Nov 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3522
Abstract
The prevalence of colon-associated diseases has increased significantly over the past several decades, as evidenced by accumulated literature on conditions such as Crohn’s disease, irritable bowel syndrome, colorectal cancer, and ulcerative colitis. Developing therapeutics for these diseases is challenging due to physiological barriers [...] Read more.
The prevalence of colon-associated diseases has increased significantly over the past several decades, as evidenced by accumulated literature on conditions such as Crohn’s disease, irritable bowel syndrome, colorectal cancer, and ulcerative colitis. Developing therapeutics for these diseases is challenging due to physiological barriers of the colon, systemic side effects, and the intestinal environment. Therefore, in a search for novel methods to overcome some of these problems, researchers discovered that microbial metabolism by gut microbiotia offers a potential method for targeted drug delivery This overview highlights several drug delivery systems used to modulate the microbiota and improve colon-targeted drug delivery. This technology will be important in developing a new generation of therapies which harness the metabolism of the human gut microflora. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Development of Colon Targeted Drug Delivery System)
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