Special Issue "Applications of Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in Drug Analysis"

A special issue of Pharmaceuticals (ISSN 1424-8247). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmaceutical Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 March 2024 | Viewed by 1482

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Isabela Tarcomnicu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Institute for Infectious Diseases “Prof. Dr. Matei Bals”, Bucharest, Romania
Interests: Bioanalysis; liquid chromatography; mass spectrometry; therapeutic drug monitoring; biomarker profiling; pharmacology
Physical and Colloidal Chemistry Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Carol Davila, Bucharest, Romania
Interests: bioanalysis; liquid chromatography; process optimization, biopharmacy, bioavailability enhancement; metabolism, natural product chemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The significant and impressive progress in pharmaceutical analysis has been sustained by the continuous development of powerful analytical instrumentation. Nevertheless, due to the permanent and complex demands of this field, pharmaceutical analysis remains challenging. At the forefront is drug development, with its need for new characterization methods, especially those driven by the recent advances in vaccine technology, as well as in formulation of large-molecule-based innovative drug products that are quickly becoming the forerunning therapy option in critical diseases such as cancer, rheumatoid disorders or autoimmune disorders. However, this does not mean that small molecule analysis is losing ground. From impurities and stability determination to adsorption, metabolism and excretion; therapeutic drug monitoring and toxicology; animal healthcare, food control; or the environmental fate of pharmaceuticals, researchers are working tirelessly to achieve more specific, sensitive and suitable methods for drug analysis. Finding potential cellular targets for new or drugs and elucidating their mechanism of action are also important aspects of pharmaceutical analysis. The constant demands of the pharmaceutical field have prompted the steady development of liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), which remains one of the most important tools in pharmaceutical. This synergy will be reflected in a Special Issue titled “Applications of Liquid Chromatography Coupled With Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in Drug Analysis,” published in the journal Pharmaceuticals. I am pleased to invite you to submit communications, research articles or high-quality review papers to this Special Issue.

Dr. Isabela Tarcomnicu
Dr. Valentina Anuta
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmaceuticals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pharmaceutical analysis
  • bioanalysis
  • liquid chromatography
  • mass spectrometry
  • impurities
  • bioavailability
  • metabolism
  • environmental fate

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

14 pages, 2093 KiB  
Article
Simultaneous Quantification of Seven Antifungal Agents in Human Serum Using Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Pharmaceuticals 2023, 16(11), 1537; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph16111537 - 30 Oct 2023
Viewed by 557
Abstract
Systemic antifungal agents are essential for high-risk patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapy or cancer chemotherapy because of the rapid increase in opportunistic fungal infections. Therapeutic drug monitoring is crucial to ensuring the efficacy and safety of antifungal agents owing to their pharmacokinetic variability. In [...] Read more.
Systemic antifungal agents are essential for high-risk patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapy or cancer chemotherapy because of the rapid increase in opportunistic fungal infections. Therapeutic drug monitoring is crucial to ensuring the efficacy and safety of antifungal agents owing to their pharmacokinetic variability. In the present study, we developed and validated a quantitative method for the simultaneous detection of seven commonly used antifungal drugs (amphotericin B, isavuconazole, voriconazole, fluconazole, posaconazole, caspofungin, and micafungin) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Methanol (containing 0.1% formic acid) was used for protein precipitation and only 50 μL of serum was required for the analysis. Chromatographic separation was conducted using a Waters Acquity UPLC C8 column, and one stable isotope-labeled agent and two analogs were used as internal standards. The calibration curves ranged from 0.1 to 50 μg/mL for all agents, and the correlation coefficient (R2) for all calibration curves was above 0.9835. The intra-day precision (1.2–11.2%), inter-day precision (2.4–13.2%), and mean bias values (−10.9 to 13.6%) were within an acceptable range of ±15%. Successful implementation of the developed method in clinical practice would facilitate the effective monitoring of these antifungal agents. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

14 pages, 2371 KiB  
Article
Early Events after Herpes Simplex Virus-Type 1 Entry Are Necessary for the Release of Gamma-Hydroxybutyrate upon Acute Infection
Pharmaceuticals 2023, 16(8), 1104; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph16081104 - 04 Aug 2023
Viewed by 594
Abstract
We reported that gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is released upon Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 (HSV-1) acute infection. However, the cellular biochemical processes involved in the production of GHB in infected cells are unclear. This study aims to shed light on the biochemical pathway and the [...] Read more.
We reported that gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is released upon Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 (HSV-1) acute infection. However, the cellular biochemical processes involved in the production of GHB in infected cells are unclear. This study aims to shed light on the biochemical pathway and the stage within the viral life cycle responsible for the release of GHB in infected cells. UV-inactivation, acyclovir (ACV), and cycloheximide (CHX) treatments were used to inhibit HSV-1 replication at various stages. Vero cells treated with UV-inactivated HSV-1 significantly decreased GHB production. However, ACV or CHX treatments did not affect GHB production. We also showed that inhibition of glycolytic enzyme enolase by sodium fluoride (NaF) significantly reduces GHB production upon infection. This finding suggests that suppression of glycolytic activity negatively affects cellular GHB production. Our data also indicated that succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, an enzyme involved in the shunt of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle to generate succinic acid, was decreased upon infection, suggesting that infection may trigger the accumulation of succinic semialdehyde, causing the production of GHB. Although the precise mechanism has yet to be defined, our results suggest that early events following infection modulates the release of GHB, which is generated through the metabolic pathways of glycolysis and TCA cycle. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop