Advances and Challenges in Understanding and Management of Diseases Caused by Oomycetes

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817). This special issue belongs to the section "Fungal Pathogens".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2024) | Viewed by 9376

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro‐food and Forest systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, Viterbo, Italy
Interests: plant pathology; disease epidemiology; detection; management strategies
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Guest Editor
Dipartimento Territorio e Sistemi Agro-Forestali (TESAF), University of Padova, Viale dell’Università 16, I-35020 Legnaro, Italy
Interests: forest pathology; molecular ecology; fungal endophytes; invasive Phytophthora species; diversity, biology, pathogenicity and taxonomy of Botryosphaeriaceae species
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Oomycetes are emerging or re-emerging threats to agriculture, horticulture, forest, and natural ecosystems. There is a need to develop new concepts in the understanding and management of oomycete pathogens in the era of climate change. The aim of this Special Issue is to provide a platform to publish articles with the aim of understanding and management of diseases caused by oomycetes.

Dr. Anna Maria Vettraino
Dr. Benedetto T. Linaldeddu
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • oomycetes
  • survey
  • biology
  • epidemiology
  • plant–pathogen interactions
  • detection
  • management
  • climate change
  • pathogenomics
  • pathogen variability

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 1369 KiB  
Article
Phytophthora Species Involved in Alnus glutinosa Decline in Portugal
by Carlo Bregant, Eduardo Batista, Sandra Hilário, Benedetto T. Linaldeddu and Artur Alves
Pathogens 2023, 12(2), 276; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens12020276 - 8 Feb 2023
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2125
Abstract
Recent field surveys conducted in five common alder ecosystems in Portugal have shown the occurrence of severe canopy dieback, bleeding canker and root rot symptoms indicative of Phytophthora infections. Isolations from symptomatic tissues, rhizosphere and water samples yielded a total of 13 Phytophthora [...] Read more.
Recent field surveys conducted in five common alder ecosystems in Portugal have shown the occurrence of severe canopy dieback, bleeding canker and root rot symptoms indicative of Phytophthora infections. Isolations from symptomatic tissues, rhizosphere and water samples yielded a total of 13 Phytophthora species belonging to 6 phylogenetic clades, including P. lacustris (13 isolates), P. multivora (10), P. amnicola (9), P. chlamydospora (6), P. polonica (6), P. bilorbang (4), P. plurivora (4), P. cinnamomi (3), P. asparagi (2), P. cactorum (2), P. pseudocryptogea (2), P. gonapodyides (1) and P. rosacearum (1). Results of the pathogenicity test confirmed the complex aetiology of common alder decline and the additional risk posed by Phytophthora multivora to the riparian habitats in Portugal. At the same time, the diversity of Phytophthora assemblages detected among the investigated sites suggests that different species could contribute to causing the same symptoms on this host. Two species, P. amnicola and P. rosacearum, are reported here for the first time in natural ecosystems in Europe. Full article
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20 pages, 2076 KiB  
Article
New Reports of Phytophthora Species in Plant Nurseries in Spain
by Beatriz Mora-Sala, Maela León, Ana Pérez-Sierra and Paloma Abad-Campos
Pathogens 2022, 11(8), 826; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens11080826 - 23 Jul 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3142
Abstract
The plant nursery industry has become an ideal reservoir for Phytophthora species and other soilborne pathogens. In this context, isolation from tissues and soil of ornamental and forest plants from nurseries in four regions of Spain was carried out. A high diversity of [...] Read more.
The plant nursery industry has become an ideal reservoir for Phytophthora species and other soilborne pathogens. In this context, isolation from tissues and soil of ornamental and forest plants from nurseries in four regions of Spain was carried out. A high diversity of Phytophthora species was confirmed. Fourteen Phytophthora phylotypes (P. cactorum, P. cambivora, P. cinnamomi, P. citrophthora, P. crassamura, P. gonapodyides, P. hedraiandra, P. nicotianae, P. niederhauserii, P. palmivora, P. plurivora, P. pseudocryptogea, P. sansomeana, and Phytophthora sp. tropicalis-like 2) were isolated from over 500 plant samples of 22 species in 19 plant genera. Nine species were detected in water sources, two of them (P. bilorbang and P. lacustris) exclusively from water samples. P. crassamura was detected for the first time in Spain. This is the first time P. pseudocryptogea is isolated from Chamaecyparis lawsoniana and Yucca rostrata in Spain. Full article
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Review

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13 pages, 1496 KiB  
Review
The Never-Ending Presence of Phytophthora Species in Italian Nurseries
by Chiara Antonelli, Margherita Biscontri, Dania Tabet and Anna Maria Vettraino
Pathogens 2023, 12(1), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens12010015 - 22 Dec 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3083
Abstract
Plant trade coupled with climate change has led to the increased spread of well-known and new Phytophthora species, a group of fungus-like organisms placed in the Kingdom Chromista. Their presence in plant nurseries is of particular concern because they are responsible for many [...] Read more.
Plant trade coupled with climate change has led to the increased spread of well-known and new Phytophthora species, a group of fungus-like organisms placed in the Kingdom Chromista. Their presence in plant nurseries is of particular concern because they are responsible for many plant diseases, with high environmental, economic and social impacts. This paper offers a brief overview of the current status of Phytophthora species in European plant nurseries. Focus was placed on Italian sites. Despite the increasing awareness of the risk of Phytophthora spread and the management strategies applied for controlling it, the complexity of the Phytophthora community in the horticulture industry is increasing over time. Since the survey carried out by Jung et al. (2016), new Phytophthora taxa and Phytophthora-host associations were identified. Phytophthorahydropathica, P. crassamura, P. pseudocryptogea and P. meadii were reported for the first time in European plant nurseries, while P. pistaciae, P. mediterranea and P. heterospora were isolated from Italian ornamental nurseries. Knowledge of Phytophthora diversity in plant nurseries and the potential damage caused by them will help to contribute to the development of early detection methods and sustainable management strategies to control Phytophthora spread in the future. Full article
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