Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)

A special issue of Oxygen (ISSN 2673-9801).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 July 2022) | Viewed by 2161

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centro de Investigação de Montanha (CIMO), Polytechnic Institute of Bragança, Campus de Santa Apolónia, 5300-253 Bragança, Portugal
Interests: chemistry of natural products; nutraceuticals and functional foods; technology of natural products; engineering of protective food products with natural compounds
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centro de Investigação de Montanha (CIMO), Instituto Politécnico de Bragança, Campus de Santa Apolónia, 5300-253 Bragança, Portugal
Interests: bio-based ingredients; stabilization of natural additives; functional foods; extraction optimization; food science and technology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are unstable molecules that have oxygen in their constitution and tend to easily react with molecules in their vicinity. As soon as antioxidants were discovered, the perception of ROS, as well as RNS (reactive nitrogen species) and RSS (reactive sulfur species), by the scientific community has been negative. This, however, has changed in recent years, with the discovery of the physiological activities of ROS, as well as signaling pathways, in the immune system acting against infections as flow modulators of the blood and mitogenic response, among many others.

Thus, this Special Issue intends to focus on any aspect related to ROS and their positive and/or negative effect on the human body.

Dr. Márcio Carocho
Dr. Sandrina A. Heleno
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Oxygen is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • reactive oxygen species
  • antioxidants
  • prooxidants
  • free radicals
  • preservatives
  • oxidation
  • fermentation
  • fenton reaction
  • lipid autoxidation

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

17 pages, 1217 KiB  
Review
Reactive Oxygen Species Signaling Pathways: Arbiters of Evolutionary Conflict?
by Neil W. Blackstone
Oxygen 2022, 2(3), 269-285; https://doi.org/10.3390/oxygen2030019 - 17 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1526
Abstract
In the history of life, cooperation between biological units has led to increased complexity, e.g., eukaryotic cells and multicellular organisms. Cooperation requires limiting the gains of “defectors” in favor of the cooperative higher-level unit. Early in an evolutionary transition, bioenergetics and reactive oxygen [...] Read more.
In the history of life, cooperation between biological units has led to increased complexity, e.g., eukaryotic cells and multicellular organisms. Cooperation requires limiting the gains of “defectors” in favor of the cooperative higher-level unit. Early in an evolutionary transition, bioenergetics and reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play a large role in managing these evolutionary conflicts. Chemiosmosis can be thought of as a poorly insulated wire—when supply exceeds demand, electrons are cast off and can form ROS. ROS signaling may thus lead to the dispersal of the excess products into the environment. These products may lead to groups and the formation of higher-level units that can subsequently be targeted by selection. Examining modern symbioses such as those between corals and photosynthetic dinoflagellates provides useful insight in this context. While ROS are an important factor in coral bleaching, little is known of the function of ROS under other circumstances, although some data suggest that ROS may modulate cooperation. ROS may have functioned similarly in the origin of eukaryotes, involving chemiosmotic mitochondria and chloroplasts. ROS may act as “arbiters” of evolutionary conflict, leading to cooperation via signaling pathways that favor the emergence of the higher-level unit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS))
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop