Feature Papers in Oxygen Volume Ⅱ

A special issue of Oxygen (ISSN 2673-9801).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 December 2023) | Viewed by 13092

Special Issue Editor

School of Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK
Interests: redox signaling; reactive oxygen species; hydrogen sulfide; hydrogen gas; nitric oxide
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are delighted to organize Volume Ⅱ of this Special Issue, entitled “Feature Papers in Oxygen Volume Ⅱ”, especially given the success of Volume Ⅰ, which you can read here, along with other publications, free of charge: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/oxygen/special_issues/Feature_Papers_Oxygen.

This Special Issue of Oxygen aims to emphasize the importance of this molecule in both chemistry and biology. Written by members of the Editorial Board and leading researchers in the field, articles will cover the recent research of some of these groups, whilst other manuscripts will take the form of reviews and opinion pieces. It is hoped that ideas and thoughts raised here will inspire young researchers who are interested in the biology and chemistry of oxygen. Therefore, this SI should cover areas such as oxidative stress and redox in cells, the uses of oxygen in biological reactions, the role of oxygen-based molecules in cell signaling, the structure and reactivity of oxygen-based molecules, atmospheric and dissolved oxygen, and the ways in which oxygen can be used in industries and for medical therapies.

Prof. Dr. John T. Hancock
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Oxygen is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • the chemical properties of oxygen
  • electrochemistry
  • reactive oxygen species and oxygen-containing free radicals
  • antioxidants and redox
  • hypoxia and oxygen levels
  • oxygen-based cell signalling
  • the chemical properties of oxides
  • oxygen molecular structures
  • oxygen acid-base reactions
  • the uses of oxygen
  • diatomic oxygen
  • the physical properties of oxygen
  • the chemical reactivity of oxygen
  • atmospheric oxygen
  • dissolved oxygen
  • oxygen-based therapies

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

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18 pages, 3843 KiB  
Article
Extraction of Bioactive Compounds from Cistus creticus Leaves and Their Use in the Preparation of Yogurt Desserts
Oxygen 2024, 4(1), 90-107; https://doi.org/10.3390/oxygen4010005 - 12 Feb 2024
Viewed by 377
Abstract
The objective of this study was to determine the optimal conditions for the recovery of bioactive and antioxidant compounds in aqueous solutions of Cistus creticus leaves and then employ the optimal extract for the enrichment of yogurt samples. The optimal conditions were established [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to determine the optimal conditions for the recovery of bioactive and antioxidant compounds in aqueous solutions of Cistus creticus leaves and then employ the optimal extract for the enrichment of yogurt samples. The optimal conditions were established by a response surface methodology and were determined to be a liquid-to-solid ratio of 48 mL/g at 76 °C for 41 min. The optimum extract yielded TPC 157.17 mg GAE/g dw and TFC 2.38 mg QE/g dw, while FRAP and DPPH values were 1258.52 and 933.67 μmol AAE/g dw, respectively. HPLC-DAD was utilized to identify and quantify specific polyphenols, like myricetin rhamnoside, in the extract. The optimal extract was then added to yogurt desserts during their preparation at three different concentrations to study how the physicochemical characteristics of the yogurt, as well as the antioxidant capacity added during enrichment, were affected. Statistical analysis of the results was carried out in order to obtain more valid data. It seems that the most suitable concentration for yogurt fortification was 0.1% w/v of the extract as, at this concentration, the yogurts exhibited higher antioxidant capacity, and their physicochemical characteristics were improved. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Oxygen Volume Ⅱ)
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18 pages, 541 KiB  
Article
Study of the Total Phenolic Content, Total Antioxidant Activity and In Vitro Digestibility of Novel Wheat Crackers Enriched with Cereal, Legume and Agricultural By-Product Flours
Oxygen 2023, 3(2), 256-273; https://doi.org/10.3390/oxygen3020017 - 16 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1290
Abstract
Wheat-flour crackers represent a staple snack option, although they lack nutritional value. Agricultural by-products such as olive and grape seeds, cereals such as barley and legumes such as lupine and chickpea are rich in bioactive compounds; therefore, flours obtained from those could represent [...] Read more.
Wheat-flour crackers represent a staple snack option, although they lack nutritional value. Agricultural by-products such as olive and grape seeds, cereals such as barley and legumes such as lupine and chickpea are rich in bioactive compounds; therefore, flours obtained from those could represent a better option for bakery products fortification. The purpose of the present study was the investigation of total phenolic content and antioxidant activity before and after the baking of wheat crackers enriched with 10–30% olive seed, 10–30% grape seed, 10–40% lupine, 10–30% barley and 20–60% and 80% chickpea flours and the evaluation of the predicted bioavailability after in vitro digestion of crackers demonstrating the highest values. Crackers and doughs were processed and analyzed using Folin–Ciocâlteu and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays, respectively. Crackers with the highest properties were subjected to in vitro gastrointestinal digestion. Baking resulted in an increase in total phenolics and antioxidant activity in the majority of crackers. Olive and grape seed flour crackers demonstrated the highest antioxidant properties. Following in vitro digestion, 30% olive seed flour crackers retained the majority of polyphenols and antioxidant activity. Crackers enriched with 30% olive seed flour could represent a healthy functional bakery snack regarding their increased antioxidant properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Oxygen Volume Ⅱ)
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13 pages, 2527 KiB  
Article
Impacts of Varying Blood Flow Restriction Cuff Size and Material on Arterial, Venous and Calf Muscle Pump-Mediated Blood Flow
Oxygen 2023, 3(2), 190-202; https://doi.org/10.3390/oxygen3020014 - 20 May 2023
Viewed by 1447
Abstract
Blood flow restriction (BFR) may become ineffective or potentially dangerous without sufficient standardization. The purpose of this investigation was therefore to (1) assess the viability of multiple sizes of a novel BFR cuff to determine arterial occlusion pressure (AOP) and (2) compare resting [...] Read more.
Blood flow restriction (BFR) may become ineffective or potentially dangerous without sufficient standardization. The purpose of this investigation was therefore to (1) assess the viability of multiple sizes of a novel BFR cuff to determine arterial occlusion pressure (AOP) and (2) compare resting arterial, venous and calf muscle pump (cMP)-mediated blood flow between the aforementioned conditions and a commonly employed wide-rigid, tourniquet-style cuff. In randomized, counter-balanced, and crossover fashion, 20 apparently healthy males (18–40 years) donned a widely employed wide-rigid (WR) cuff, along with the largest (NE) and manufacturer-recommended sizes (NER) of a novel narrow-elastic cuff. Participants subsequently assessed AOP, as well as (at 80%AOP) arterial, venous, and venous cMP flow relative to baseline values via ultrasound. All analyses were performed at a significance level of p < 0.05. Analyses revealed a significant condition effect for AOP (p < 0.001; ηp2 = 0.907) whereby WR was significantly lower than both NE and NER; in addition, the latter two did not differ. Compared with baseline, there were no statistically significant differences between cuffs for either arterial or cMP-mediated blood flow. Unsurprisingly, no participants demonstrated venous blood flow at 80% AOP. These findings support the viability of a novel narrow-elastic BFR product, evidenced by consistent AOP acquisition and equivocal blood flow parameters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Oxygen Volume Ⅱ)
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11 pages, 2489 KiB  
Article
Mitochondria-Stimulating and Antioxidant Effects of Slovak Propolis Varieties on Bovine Spermatozoa
Oxygen 2023, 3(2), 179-189; https://doi.org/10.3390/oxygen3020013 - 26 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1195
Abstract
Propolis is a natural honeybee product, which is known for its beneficial pharmacological effects and use in traditional medicine. This study aspired to investigate the chemical and antioxidant properties of five propolis specimens, followed by the analysis of their in vitro impact on [...] Read more.
Propolis is a natural honeybee product, which is known for its beneficial pharmacological effects and use in traditional medicine. This study aspired to investigate the chemical and antioxidant properties of five propolis specimens, followed by the analysis of their in vitro impact on bovine spermatozoa vitality and oxidative profile. Semen samples from 10 breeding bulls were incubated in the absence or presence of 50 µg/mL propolis extracts, and selected sperm quality parameters including motility, mitochondrial activity, cAMP concentration, NAD+/NADH ratio, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and superoxide production were assessed at 2 h and 24 h. Sperm motion behavior and mitochondrial function were stabilized particularly in the presence of propolis collected from Hrabské and Litpovský Hrádok, Slovakia. At the same time, all propolis specimens acted as significant ROS quenchers and stabilized the oxidative milieu of the sperm cultures. Our data suggest that propolis may stabilize the mitochondrial function of spermatozoa while preventing excessive oxidative insults, thereby showing the potential to sustain the sperm motility of extended semen. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Oxygen Volume Ⅱ)
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Review

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37 pages, 1365 KiB  
Review
The Thirty-Fifth Anniversary of K+ Channels in O2 Sensing: What We Know and What We Don’t Know
Oxygen 2024, 4(1), 53-89; https://doi.org/10.3390/oxygen4010004 - 09 Feb 2024
Viewed by 952
Abstract
On the thirty-fifth anniversary of the first description of O2-sensitive K+ channels in the carotid body chemoreceptors O2 sensing remains a salient issue in the literature. Whereas much has been learned about this subject, important questions such as the [...] Read more.
On the thirty-fifth anniversary of the first description of O2-sensitive K+ channels in the carotid body chemoreceptors O2 sensing remains a salient issue in the literature. Whereas much has been learned about this subject, important questions such as the identity of the specific K+ channel subtype(s) responsible for O2 sensing by chemoreceptors and the mechanism(s) by which their activities are altered by hypoxia have not yet been definitively answered. O2 sensing is a fundamental biological process necessary for the acute and chronic responses to varying environmental O2 levels which allow organisms to adapt to hypoxia. Whereas chronic responses depend on the modulation of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors which determine the expression of numerous genes encoding enzymes, transporters and growth factors, acute responses rely mainly on the dynamic modulation of ion channels by hypoxia, causing adaptive changes in cell excitability, contractility and secretory activity in specialized tissues. The most widely studied oxygen-sensitive ion channels are potassium channels, but oxygen sensing by members of both the calcium and sodium channel families has also been demonstrated. Given the explosion of information on this topic, in this review, we will focus on the mechanisms of physiological oxygen chemotransduction by PO2-dependent K+ channels, with particular emphasis on their function in carotid body chemoreceptor cells (CBCC) and pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC), highlighting areas of consensus and controversy within the field. We will first describe the most well-established concepts, those reproduced in multiple laboratories, and then discuss selected observations or questions that remain unresolved, and that limit our progress in this field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Oxygen Volume Ⅱ)
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30 pages, 1428 KiB  
Review
The Ion Channels Involved in Oxidative Stress-Related Gastrointestinal Diseases
Oxygen 2023, 3(3), 336-365; https://doi.org/10.3390/oxygen3030022 - 21 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1314
Abstract
The pathogenesis of various gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, including gastritis, ulcers, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and cancer, can be linked to oxidative stress. It is known that reactive species carry out a crucial role in the genesis and progression of these pathologies; however, the [...] Read more.
The pathogenesis of various gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, including gastritis, ulcers, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and cancer, can be linked to oxidative stress. It is known that reactive species carry out a crucial role in the genesis and progression of these pathologies; however, the contribution of ionic channels in their development is still under discussion. The function of ion channels in the gastrointestinal tract influences a variety of cellular processes. Acid-base balance, mucus layer, microbiota and mucosal blood flow are only some of the essential features for maintaining the mucosal integrity of the cellular barrier in the intestine, allowing for the preservation of proper permeability and ensuring tissue homeostasis. As the functional modulation of several ion channels is altered during oxidative stress conditions associated with gastrointestinal inflammation, this review focuses on contributing new insight into the roles of and the relationship between ion channels and oxidative stress in GI diseases. The association between ion channels and oxidative stress conditions could be used in diagnostics and the development of new pharmacological treatments for major gastrointestinal diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Oxygen Volume Ⅱ)
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20 pages, 1678 KiB  
Review
The On/Off History of Hydrogen in Medicine: Will the Interest Persist This Time Around?
Oxygen 2023, 3(1), 143-162; https://doi.org/10.3390/oxygen3010011 - 14 Mar 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 4269
Abstract
Over 2000 publications including more than 100 human studies seem to indicate that humans have only recently benefited from or known about the medical effects of H2 within the past 15 years. However, we have unknowingly benefited from H2 since the [...] Read more.
Over 2000 publications including more than 100 human studies seem to indicate that humans have only recently benefited from or known about the medical effects of H2 within the past 15 years. However, we have unknowingly benefited from H2 since the dawn of time, from H2-producing bacteria to the use of naturally occurring hydrogen-rich waters. Moreover, the first writings on the therapeutic effects of H2 date to around 1793. Since then, papers appeared sporadically in the literature every few decades but never exploded until Ohsawa et al. again demonstrated hydrogen’s therapeutic effects in 2007. This landmark paper appears to have been the spark that ignited the medical interest in hydrogen. Although H2 was used in the 1880s to locate intestinal perforations, in the 1940s in deep sea diving, and in the 1960s to measure blood flow, H2 was largely viewed as biologically inert. This review highlights the history of hydrogen in the genesis/evolution of life and its medicinal and non-medicinal use in humans. Although hydrogen medicine has a long and erratic history, perhaps future history will show that, this time around, these 15 years of ignited interest resulted in a self-sustaining explosion of its unique medical effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Oxygen Volume Ⅱ)
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Other

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13 pages, 3674 KiB  
Perspective
Oxygen in the Earth System
Oxygen 2023, 3(3), 287-299; https://doi.org/10.3390/oxygen3030019 - 27 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1555
Abstract
Atmospheric oxygen is produced and consumed by life on Earth, and the ozone layer protects life on Earth from harmful solar UV radiation. The research on oxygen in the Earth system is of interest to many different geoscientific communities, from paleoclimatology to aeronomy. [...] Read more.
Atmospheric oxygen is produced and consumed by life on Earth, and the ozone layer protects life on Earth from harmful solar UV radiation. The research on oxygen in the Earth system is of interest to many different geoscientific communities, from paleoclimatology to aeronomy. I provide a brief overview of the research activities and their motivations. In situ measurements and remote sensing of atmospheric oxygen are described. The global evolution, distribution, and trends of atmospheric oxygen are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Oxygen Volume Ⅱ)
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