Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Imaging in Dentistry

A special issue of Oral (ISSN 2673-6373).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2022) | Viewed by 3305

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Prosthetic Dentistry and Dental Materials, Iuliu Hațieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 32 Clinicilor Street, 400006 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: orthodontics; digital dentistry; occlusion; temporomandibular joint; temporomandibular joint disorders; CBCT; MRI
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Guest Editor
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Radiology, Iuliu Hațieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 400006 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: oral and maxillofacial radiology; CBCT; MRI

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the majority of academic and professional fields, digital dentistry has been growing steadily and is now pervasive. Digital technology has recently revolutionized almost all areas of dentistry. In terms of quality, increased effectiveness, time savings, and cost savings, digital dentistry has a lot to offer.

Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging can induce precise and clear three-dimensional (3D) images. Both diagnosis and treatment planning benefit from the use of CBCT images; enhanced planning and more confidence in diagnosing are a few of its advantages. CBCT is useful in all dentistry areas for dentomaxillofacial imaging: maxillofacial surgery, implantology, image-guided surgery, orthodontics, endodontics, periodontics, and prosthodontics, aiding in obtaining an accurate image. Obstructive sleep apnea can also benefit from CBCT imaging. Compared to other technologies such as conventional X-rays and medical CT scans, CBCT has many positive aspects, among which are image accuracy, short scan time, interactive display, image detail, and beam limitation.

This Special Issue’s objective is to collect the most recent innovative dental sources into a cohesive body of evidence using current CBCT images in diagnosis and treatment planning, as a guide for potential innovative research in the future.

Academics, professionals, researchers, and enthusiastic practitioners in the field of dentistry are invited to submit articles for this Special Issue. We invite you to submit review articles, randomized clinical trials, original articles, prospective or retrospective studies, short communications, and case reports that highlight the contribution of cutting-edge digitization to dentistry. We warmly invite you to join us and look forward to receiving your submission.

Dr. Oana Almasan
Prof. Dr. Mihaela Hedeșiu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Oral is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • CBCT
  • diagnostic imaging
  • 3D imaging
  • oral radiology
  • virtual treatment planning

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Editorial

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4 pages, 226 KiB  
Editorial
Foreword to the Special Issue on Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Imaging in Dentistry
by Oana Almășan
Oral 2022, 2(3), 238-241; https://doi.org/10.3390/oral2030022 - 9 Sep 2022
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Abstract
It is a great honor and privilege to present this Special Issue on “Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Imaging in Dentistry” [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Imaging in Dentistry)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

10 pages, 4896 KiB  
Communication
Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Assessment of Bifid and Trifid Mandibular Canals: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Silvia D’Agostino, Giulia Valentini, Alessandro Baldini, Elisabetta Ferrara and Marco Dolci
Oral 2023, 3(2), 266-275; https://doi.org/10.3390/oral3020022 - 19 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1063
Abstract
The exact knowledge of the mandibular canal position is fundamental in oral surgery and implantology. Clinicians have to be extremely cautious when operating in close proximity to this structure in order to avoid damaging the neurovascular bundle. Several anatomical variations of the mandibular [...] Read more.
The exact knowledge of the mandibular canal position is fundamental in oral surgery and implantology. Clinicians have to be extremely cautious when operating in close proximity to this structure in order to avoid damaging the neurovascular bundle. Several anatomical variations of the mandibular canal have been described in the literature, such as bifid or trifid structures. The use of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) offers a detailed representation of the inferior alveolar nerve path, albeit with some difficulties of identification when dental implants or metal prosthesis are present. The aim of this study is to retrospectively evaluate the prevalence and location of bifid/trifid mandibular canals (BMC/TMC) by CBCT in Italian patients. The screening phase involved 584 patients, only 238 enrolled (97 men; 141 women), with an average age of 51 ± 17.20. A total of 36 patients (15.25%) showed at least one bifid mandibular canal; only 2 patients (0.84%) showed a trifid mandibular canal. Overall, 12 patients (5.04%) presented this variation bilaterally. There was no association with the sex of the enrolled sample. In conclusion, the presence of BMCs and TMCs may be considered as a risk factor for the onset of neurovascular complications. Being aware of changes in the mandibular canal helps clinicians to prevent inferior alveolar nerve impairments that may occur during oral surgery and implantology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Imaging in Dentistry)
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