World Oceans Day 2022

A special issue of Oceans (ISSN 2673-1924).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (8 June 2022) | Viewed by 7376

Special Issue Editors

Department for Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, The Kristineberg Marine Research Station, 45178 Fiskebäckskil, Sweden
Interests: ocean acidification; climate change; eco-physiology; echinoderms
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centro Nacional Instituto Español de Oceanografia (IEO-CSIC), Centro Oceanografico de A Coruña, 15001 A Coruña, Spain
Interests: marine plankton ecology; nitrogen cycle; food webs; stable isotopes
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, East Boothbay, ME 04544, USA
Interests: phytoplankton; marine biogeochemistry; elemental stoichiometry; primary production; nitrogen cycling; sub/arctic systems; sub/tropical systems
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
1. IAEA Marine Environmental Laboratories, 4 Quai Antoine 1er, 98000, Monaco
2. Centre for Marine Ecosystems Research, School of Science, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia
Interests: His research focuses on the study of a variety of key, global environmental processes in both the present day and geologic past, using a suite of stable and radioactive tracers as proxies. These include the Ocean’s role in global climate change as a source or sink of atmospheric CO2; the impact of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) on nutrient and trace metal biogeochemistry in the ocean; and the reconstruction of the historical patterns of climate, pollution and other natural and anthropogenically-driven processes.
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Joint Research Centre, European Commission, 21027 Varese, Italy
Interests: physical-biological coupling; numerical modelling; climate change impacts; anthropocentric forcing; science-policy interface
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Oceans are the origin of life, connecting us all. However, climate change has led to the emergence of numerous challenges for oceans today. OCEANS is honored to announce a new Special Issue to celebrate the World Oceans Day 2022 (June 8).  The scope of this Special Issue includes but is not limited to ocean complexity, ocean impacts and challenges, and resilience and innovation. We encourage researchers from all areas of ocean science to submit abstracts for this Special Issue. We will then make a decision on the full manuscripts for this Special Issue or as a regular paper. Let us all take action together to preserve our ocean.

OCEANS is an open-access journal that normally charges authors a fee. However, MDPI has agreed to publish papers that have been prepared for this important issue free of any charge.

This will be a dynamic Special Issue, and articles will be published as soon as the reviewers and editors are ready to accept them, without waiting for the deadline for the entire Special Issue to arrive.

Dr. Sam Dupont
Prof. Dr. Antonio Bode
Dr. Michael W. Lomas
Prof. Dr. Pere Masqué
Dr. Diego Macías
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Oceans is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

14 pages, 7191 KiB  
Article
Impact of Indian Ocean Dipole Events on Phytoplankton Size Classes Distribution in the Arabian Sea
by Rebekah Shunmugapandi, Shirishkumar Gedam and Arun B. Inamdar
Oceans 2022, 3(4), 480-493; https://doi.org/10.3390/oceans3040032 - 24 Oct 2022
Viewed by 1975
Abstract
Changes in the environmental condition associated with climatic events could potentially influence the PSC dynamics of the regional marine ecosystem. The Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) is one of the critical ocean–atmosphere interactions that affects the climate of the Arabian Sea, and it could [...] Read more.
Changes in the environmental condition associated with climatic events could potentially influence the PSC dynamics of the regional marine ecosystem. The Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) is one of the critical ocean–atmosphere interactions that affects the climate of the Arabian Sea, and it could be a potential factor influencing the regional PSC distribution. However, the relationship between PSC and IOD remains unclear and less explored. In this study, using the in-situ database acquired from the Arabian Sea, we reparametrized the three−component abundance−based phytoplankton size class model and applied it to reconstructed satellite−derived chlorophyll−a concentration to extract the fractional contribution of phytoplankton size classes to chlorophyll−a concentration. Further, we investigated the influence of IOD on the changes in the biological–physical properties in the Arabian Sea. The results showed that the biological–physical processes in the Arabian Sea are interlinked and the changes in the IOD mode control the physical variables like sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface height (SSH), and mixed layer depth (MLD), which influence the specific PSC abundance. Unprecedented changes in the PSC distribution and physical properties were observed during the extreme positive and negative IOD events, which clearly indicated the potential role of IOD in altering the PSC distribution in the Arabian Sea. This study highlights the impact of extreme climate events on PSC distribution and the need for a better understanding of the associated physical–biological–climate interactions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue World Oceans Day 2022)
Show Figures

Figure 1

8 pages, 2292 KiB  
Article
Effectiveness of Moorings Constructed from Rope in Reducing Impacts to Seagrass
by Richard K. F. Unsworth, Leanne C. Cullen-Unsworth, James N. Hope, Benjamin L. H. Jones, Richard J. Lilley, Hanna K. Nuuttila, Beth Williams and Nicole E. Esteban
Oceans 2022, 3(3), 431-438; https://doi.org/10.3390/oceans3030029 - 31 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 4138
Abstract
Seagrass meadows commonly reside in shallow sheltered coastal environments which are typically safe havens for mooring boats. There is evidence from around the globe that the use of common swinging chain moorings leads to halos of bare sediment in otherwise productive seagrass. These [...] Read more.
Seagrass meadows commonly reside in shallow sheltered coastal environments which are typically safe havens for mooring boats. There is evidence from around the globe that the use of common swinging chain moorings leads to halos of bare sediment in otherwise productive seagrass. These halos reduce animal abundance and diversity and lead to a loss of the carbon stored within sediments. To protect and enhance seagrass ecosystem services, low-cost simple solutions are required that can solve the problems of boating-based disturbance. In the present novel study, we provide evidence that the simple replacement of mooring chains with rope can significantly reduce damage to sensitive benthic habitats such as seagrass. At three locations across a range of environmental conditions, we provide evidence that well-established moorings constructed from rope do not damage seagrass. Overall, there was a significant effect (F1,756 = 299.46, p < 0.001) of the mooring type and distance from the mooring base. This equates to a 44% increase in seagrass cover within areas around a rope mooring relative to a chain one. Most small boat mooring activity happens within the summer months, therefore large heavy-duty winter mooring systems are not required in many situations, opening opportunities for adapted systems that have a reduced environmental impact. The present study suggests that there is a ready-made, low-technology, low-cost solution already in existence for halting the widespread loss of seagrass from small boat mooring damage and allowing recovery and opportunity for restoration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue World Oceans Day 2022)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop