How to Prevent Obesity and Inflammatory Disease 2024

A special issue of Obesities (ISSN 2673-4168).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 1956

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche Chimiche e Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di Palermo, 90133 Palermo, Italy
Interests: human nutrition; micronutrients; biofortified food; physical activity; gut peptides; bone remodeling and metabolism; glucose homeostasis; lipid homeostasis; systemic homeostasis; human physiology
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Obesity is the most prevalent metabolic disease. New approaches are necessary to prevent the rise in inflammatory diseases. For this Special Issue, we are interested in both original research manuscripts and review articles looking at how changing lifestyle, eating habits, and mindset can prevent or treat these diseases. Articles focusing on the different areas (gastrointestinal tract, brain, liver, adipose tissue, bone, etc.) involved in obesity and inflammatory disease and how and to what extent these interact at the cellular and system levels are welcome.

Dr. Sara Baldassano
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Obesities is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gastrointestinal tract
  • central nervous system
  • physical activity
  • bone
  • adipose tissue
  • insulin
  • liver
  • mental health
  • eating disorders
  • muscle
  • endocrine system
  • lifestyle intervention

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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12 pages, 761 KiB  
Article
Effects of Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation in Women with Metabolic Syndrome and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Evaluated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging—Coenzyme Q10 in Metabolic Syndrome and NAFLD
by Daniela Casagrande, Fernando Figueiredo Waib, Jorge Elias Júnior and Alceu Afonso Jordão Júnior
Obesities 2024, 4(2), 106-117; https://doi.org/10.3390/obesities4020011 - 15 May 2024
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Abstract
(1) Introduction: Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a component present in the transport chain of mitochondrial electrons with antioxidant property. Currently, there are limited studies which indicate the effects of its supplementation on Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD). (2) Objective: [...] Read more.
(1) Introduction: Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a component present in the transport chain of mitochondrial electrons with antioxidant property. Currently, there are limited studies which indicate the effects of its supplementation on Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD). (2) Objective: This work was conducted to determine the effects of CoQ10 supplementation in women with MetS and NAFLD. (3) Methodology: This double-blind randomized clinical-controlled trial was performed among 22 women with MetS and NAFLD. Patients were randomized into two groups: group A (n = 11), which received 200 mg/day of CoQ10; and group B (n = 11), which received a placebo medication for 12 weeks. The hepatic steatosis present in NAFLD, the volume of abdominal fat, and visceral fat volume were evaluated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Anthropometric, blood pressure, and marker serums that compound the MetS were also analyzed. (4) Results: A decrease in visceral fat volume (p = 0.02), abdominal circumference (p = 0.03/CI = 0.19–3.80), and increase in HDL-cholesterol (p = 0.01/CI = −9.80: −1.44) was observed in the CoQ10-supplemented group. We did not find significant changes in any of the other variables evaluated. (5) Conclusions: Supplementation with CoQ10 for 12 weeks, even if discreetly, brought some benefits for the supplemented group whereas no changes were observed in the control group. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue How to Prevent Obesity and Inflammatory Disease 2024)
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10 pages, 619 KiB  
Article
Ability of Hypocaloric Diets to Change Nutrient–Phyla Associations after 8 Weeks of Intervention
by Natália Yumi Noronha, Luzânia dos Santos Martins, Lígia Moriguchi Watanabe, Marcela Augusta de Souza Pinhel, Guilherme da Silva Rodrigues, Isabelle Mello Schneider, Carolina Ferreira Nicoletti, Heitor Bernardes Pereira Delfino, Daniela Carlos and Carla Barbosa Nonino
Obesities 2024, 4(2), 45-54; https://doi.org/10.3390/obesities4020005 - 26 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Background: Previous studies have suggested that changes in the composition of intestinal microbiota may be influenced by dietary quality. Objective: This study aimed to assess the impact of a hypocaloric diet on the relationship between microbiota and clinical/dietary variables. Methods: This was a [...] Read more.
Background: Previous studies have suggested that changes in the composition of intestinal microbiota may be influenced by dietary quality. Objective: This study aimed to assess the impact of a hypocaloric diet on the relationship between microbiota and clinical/dietary variables. Methods: This was a longitudinal study. Ten women with obesity (Obese Group, ObG) participated in an 8-week home-based hypocaloric diet intervention. Anthropometric, dietary intake, biochemical, and gut microbiota assessments were conducted before and after the intervention. Microbiota relative abundance was determined using real-time PCR in triplicate. Results: In the ObG, the hypocaloric diet intervention led to significant weight loss (before: 119.5 ± 10.3 kg; after: 114.9 ± 10.2 kg; p = 0.003). Following the intervention, positive correlations were observed between nutrient intake and phyla composition: Actinobacteria phylum with fibers (r = 0.787; p = 0.012), Firmicutes phylum with proteins (r = 0.736; p = 0.024), and Proteobacteria phylum with lipids (r = 0.669; p = 0.049). Conclusions: The hypocaloric diet intervention improved health parameters associated with obesity and its comorbidities, demonstrating associations between nutrient intake and specific phyla. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue How to Prevent Obesity and Inflammatory Disease 2024)
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8 pages, 453 KiB  
Brief Report
Serum Cobalt Concentration and DNA Methylation Signatures in Women with Obesity
by Natália Yumi Noronha, Luísa Maria Diani, Guilherme da Silva Rodrigues, Isabela Harumi Yonehara Noma, Vanessa Aparecida Batista Pereira, Marcela Augusta de Souza Pinhel, Lígia Moriguchi Watanabe, Déborah Araújo Morais, Fernando Barbosa, Jr. and Carla Barbosa Nonino
Obesities 2024, 4(2), 85-92; https://doi.org/10.3390/obesities4020009 - 27 Apr 2024
Viewed by 510
Abstract
Obesity, a multifactorial disorder, has been associated with alterations in metal metabolismand epigenetic modifications. This pilot case–control study aimed to investigate serum cobalt concentrations and associated DNA methylation patterns in women with obesity. Serum cobalt levels were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass [...] Read more.
Obesity, a multifactorial disorder, has been associated with alterations in metal metabolismand epigenetic modifications. This pilot case–control study aimed to investigate serum cobalt concentrations and associated DNA methylation patterns in women with obesity. Serum cobalt levels were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), revealing significantly higher cobalt concentrations in participants with normal weight than in participants with obesity. Additionally, DNA methylation analysis identified differentially methylated positions (DMPs) associated with cobalt exposure, and DMPs between groups highlighted hypomethylation in the top DMPs in individuals with obesity. Functional enrichment analysis of these DMPs unveiled potential pathways implicated in apoptosis, cancer, and metabolic signaling, warranting further investigation into the mechanistic links. This study provides preliminary insights into the interplay between cobalt exposure, DNA methylation, and potential implications for obesity management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue How to Prevent Obesity and Inflammatory Disease 2024)
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