nutrients-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Dietary Supplements in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2023) | Viewed by 82839

Printed Edition Available!
A printed edition of this Special Issue is available here.

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy
Interests: medicine; cardiology; hypertension; acute coronary syndrome; heart failure

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Medicine, Fleischer Institute for Diabetes and Metabolism (FIDAM), Einstein-Mount Sinai Diabetes Research Center (ES-DRC), Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY 10461, USA
2. Department of Advanced Biomedical Science, “Federico II” University, International Translational Research and Medical Education Consortium (ITME), 80131 Naples, Italy
3. Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY 10461, USA
Interests: cardiology; hypertension; restenosis; heart failure; myocardial infarction; endothelial dysfunction; mitochondria; diabetes; microRNAs; insulin resistance; atherosclerosis; thrombosis; cardiac hypertrophy; pancreatic beta cell function; insulin release
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There has been growing interest and evidence concerning the effects of dietary supplements on cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. The purpose of this Special Issue is to gather high-quality research papers with a solid research setting and/or translational potential on this topic, in order to create an up-to-date, systematic overview that examines, in detail, the functional role of dietary supplements in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. We are interested in both clinical and pre-clinical investigations testing novel hypotheses that can advance the field. Novel therapeutic hypotheses and medicinal chemistry endeavors toward novel drug development are also encouraged. In this Special Issue of Nutrients, we are making a call to action to motivate researchers to submit their invaluable studies on this intriguing topic. This Special Issue welcomes the submission of manuscripts which either include evidence-based original research or reviews of the scientific literature.

Prof. Bruno Trimarco
Prof. Gaetano Santulli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nutraceuticals
  • Vitamins and multivitamins
  • Lifestyle, genetics, and epigenetics
  • Endothelial function
  • Antioxidants
  • Fructose, soft drinks, sweetened beverages
  • Seaweed polyphenols, probiotics, soy
  • Insulin resistance
  • Fish oil
  • Ketogenic diet, Mediterranean diet, vegetarian diet
  • Coenzyme Q10
  • Beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB)
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Hypertension

Published Papers (14 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review, Other

3 pages, 180 KiB  
Editorial
Dietary Supplements in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases
by Bruno Trimarco and Gaetano Santulli
Nutrients 2024, 16(10), 1418; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16101418 - 8 May 2024
Viewed by 1152
Abstract
Recent research has sparked increasing interest in the effects of dietary supplements on cardiovascular and metabolic disorders [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplements in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases)

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review, Other

12 pages, 1797 KiB  
Article
Beneficial Effects of Citrus Bergamia Polyphenolic Fraction on Saline Load-Induced Injury in Primary Cerebral Endothelial Cells from the Stroke-Prone Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat Model
by Rosita Stanzione, Maurizio Forte, Maria Cotugno, Francesca Oppedisano, Cristina Carresi, Simona Marchitti, Vincenzo Mollace, Massimo Volpe and Speranza Rubattu
Nutrients 2023, 15(6), 1334; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15061334 - 9 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1481
Abstract
High salt load is a known noxious stimulus for vascular cells and a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases in both animal models and humans. The stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHRSP) accelerates stroke predisposition upon high-salt dietary feeding. We previously demonstrated that high salt [...] Read more.
High salt load is a known noxious stimulus for vascular cells and a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases in both animal models and humans. The stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHRSP) accelerates stroke predisposition upon high-salt dietary feeding. We previously demonstrated that high salt load causes severe injury in primary cerebral endothelial cells isolated from SHRSP. This cellular model offers a unique opportunity to test the impact of substances toward the mechanisms underlying high-salt-induced vascular damage. We tested the effects of a bergamot polyphenolic fraction (BPF) on high-salt-induced injury in SHRSP cerebral endothelial cells. Cells were exposed to 20 mM NaCl for 72 h either in the absence or the presence of BPF. As a result, we confirmed that high salt load increased cellular ROS level, reduced viability, impaired angiogenesis, and caused mitochondrial dysfunction with a significant increase in mitochondrial oxidative stress. The addition of BPF reduced oxidative stress, rescued cell viability and angiogenesis, and recovered mitochondrial function with a significant decrease in mitochondrial oxidative stress. In conclusion, BPF counteracts the key molecular mechanisms underlying high-salt-induced endothelial cell damage. This natural antioxidant substance may represent a valuable adjuvant to treat vascular disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplements in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

14 pages, 2835 KiB  
Article
Analysis of White Mulberry Leaves and Dietary Supplements, ATR-FTIR Combined with Chemometrics for the Rapid Determination of 1-Deoxynojirimycin
by Agata Walkowiak-Bródka, Natalia Piekuś-Słomka, Kacper Wnuk and Bogumiła Kupcewicz
Nutrients 2022, 14(24), 5276; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14245276 - 10 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3452
Abstract
Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease affecting more people every year. The treatment of diabetes and its complications involve substantial healthcare expenditures. Thus, there is a need to identify natural products that can be used as nutraceuticals to prevent and treat early-stage diabetes. [...] Read more.
Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease affecting more people every year. The treatment of diabetes and its complications involve substantial healthcare expenditures. Thus, there is a need to identify natural products that can be used as nutraceuticals to prevent and treat early-stage diabetes. White mulberry (Morus alba L.) is a plant that has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years due to its many beneficial biological properties. White mulberry leaves are a source of 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ), which, due to its ability to inhibit α-glucosidase, can be used to regulate postprandial glucose concentration. In addition to consuming dried white mulberry leaves as herbal tea, many functional foods also contain this raw material. The development of the dietary supplements market brings many scientific and regulatory challenges to the safety, quality and effectiveness of such products containing concentrated amounts of nutraceuticals. In the present study, the quality of 19 products was assessed by determining the content of DNJ, selected (poly)phenols and antioxidant activity (DPPH assay). Nine of these products were herbal teas, and the other samples were dietary supplements. These results indicate the low quality of tested dietary supplements, the use of which (due to the low content of nutraceuticals) cannot bring the expected beneficial effects on health. Moreover, a method for determining the content of DNJ (the essential component for antidiabetic activity) based on ATR-FTIR spectroscopy combined with PLS regression has been proposed. This might be an alternative method to the commonly used chromatographic process requiring extraction and derivatization of the sample. It allows for a quick screening assessment of the quality of products containing white mulberry leaves. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplements in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 1241 KiB  
Article
Effects of l-Arginine Plus Vitamin C Supplementation on Physical Performance, Endothelial Function, and Persistent Fatigue in Adults with Long COVID: A Single-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial
by Matteo Tosato, Riccardo Calvani, Anna Picca, Francesca Ciciarello, Vincenzo Galluzzo, Hélio José Coelho-Júnior, Angela Di Giorgio, Clara Di Mario, Jacopo Gervasoni, Elisa Gremese, Paolo Maria Leone, Antonio Nesci, Anna Maria Paglionico, Angelo Santoliquido, Luca Santoro, Lavinia Santucci, Barbara Tolusso, Andrea Urbani, Federico Marini, Emanuele Marzetti and Francesco Landiadd Show full author list remove Hide full author list
Nutrients 2022, 14(23), 4984; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14234984 - 23 Nov 2022
Cited by 33 | Viewed by 18632
Abstract
Long COVID, a condition characterized by symptom and/or sign persistence following an acute COVID-19 episode, is associated with reduced physical performance and endothelial dysfunction. Supplementation of l-arginine may improve endothelial and muscle function by stimulating nitric oxide synthesis. A single-blind randomized, placebo-controlled [...] Read more.
Long COVID, a condition characterized by symptom and/or sign persistence following an acute COVID-19 episode, is associated with reduced physical performance and endothelial dysfunction. Supplementation of l-arginine may improve endothelial and muscle function by stimulating nitric oxide synthesis. A single-blind randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in adults aged between 20 and 60 years with persistent fatigue attending a post-acute COVID-19 outpatient clinic. Participants were randomized 1:1 to receive twice-daily orally either a combination of 1.66 g l-arginine plus 500 mg liposomal vitamin C or a placebo for 28 days. The primary outcome was the distance walked on the 6 min walk test. Secondary outcomes were handgrip strength, flow-mediated dilation, and fatigue persistence. Fifty participants were randomized to receive either l-arginine plus vitamin C or a placebo. Forty-six participants (median (interquartile range) age 51 (14), 30 [65%] women), 23 per group, received the intervention to which they were allocated and completed the study. At 28 days, l-arginine plus vitamin C increased the 6 min walk distance (+30 (40.5) m; placebo: +0 (75) m, p = 0.001) and induced a greater improvement in handgrip strength (+3.4 (7.5) kg) compared with the placebo (+1 (6.6) kg, p = 0.03). The flow-mediated dilation was greater in the active group than in the placebo (14.3% (7.3) vs. 9.4% (5.8), p = 0.03). At 28 days, fatigue was reported by two participants in the active group (8.7%) and 21 in the placebo group (80.1%; p < 0.0001). l-arginine plus vitamin C supplementation improved walking performance, muscle strength, endothelial function, and fatigue in adults with long COVID. This supplement may, therefore, be considered to restore physical performance and relieve persistent symptoms in this patient population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplements in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases)
Show Figures

Figure 1

26 pages, 3381 KiB  
Article
Beneficial Effects of Essential Oils from the Mediterranean Diet on Gut Microbiota and Their Metabolites in Ischemic Heart Disease and Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus
by María José Sánchez-Quintero, Josué Delgado, Dina Medina-Vera, Víctor M. Becerra-Muñoz, María Isabel Queipo-Ortuño, Mario Estévez, Isaac Plaza-Andrades, Jorge Rodríguez-Capitán, Pedro L. Sánchez, Maria G. Crespo-Leiro, Manuel F. Jiménez-Navarro and Francisco Javier Pavón-Morón
Nutrients 2022, 14(21), 4650; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14214650 - 3 Nov 2022
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3979
Abstract
Ischemic heart disease (IHD) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) remain major health problems worldwide and commonly coexist in individuals. Gut microbial metabolites, such as trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), have been linked to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Previous studies [...] Read more.
Ischemic heart disease (IHD) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) remain major health problems worldwide and commonly coexist in individuals. Gut microbial metabolites, such as trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), have been linked to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Previous studies have reported dysbiosis in the gut microbiota of these patients and the prebiotic effects of some components of the Mediterranean diet. Essential oil emulsions of savory (Satureja hortensis), parsley (Petroselinum crispum) and rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) were assessed as nutraceuticals and prebiotics in IHD and T2DM. Humanized mice harboring gut microbiota derived from that of patients with IHD and T2DM were supplemented with L-carnitine and orally treated with essential oil emulsions for 40 days. We assessed the effects on gut microbiota composition and abundance, microbial metabolites and plasma markers of cardiovascular disease, inflammation and oxidative stress. Our results showed that essential oil emulsions in mice supplemented with L-carnitine have prebiotic effects on beneficial commensal bacteria, mainly Lactobacillus genus. There was a decrease in plasma TMAO and an increase in fecal SCFAs levels in mice treated with parsley and rosemary essential oils. Thrombomodulin levels were increased in mice treated with savory and parsley essential oils. While mice treated with parsley and rosemary essential oils showed a decrease in plasma cytokines (INFɣ, TNFα, IL-12p70 and IL-22); savory essential oil was associated with increased levels of chemokines (CXCL1, CCL2 and CCL11). Finally, there was a decrease in protein carbonyls and pentosidine according to the essential oil emulsion. These results suggest that changes in the gut microbiota induced by essential oils of parsley, savory and rosemary as prebiotics could differentially regulate cardiovascular and metabolic factors, which highlights the potential of these nutraceuticals for reducing IHD risk in patients affected by T2DM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplements in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 750 KiB  
Article
Glucosamine Use Is Associated with a Higher Risk of Cardiovascular Diseases in Patients with Osteoarthritis: Results from a Large Study in 685,778 Subjects
by Huan Yu, Junhui Wu, Hongbo Chen, Mengying Wang, Siyue Wang, Ruotong Yang, Siyan Zhan, Xueying Qin, Tao Wu, Yiqun Wu and Yonghua Hu
Nutrients 2022, 14(18), 3694; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14183694 - 7 Sep 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 6411
Abstract
Glucosamine is widely used around the world and as a popular dietary supplement and treatment in patients with osteoarthritis in China; however, the real-world cardiovascular risk of glucosamine in long-term use is still unclear. A retrospective, population-based cohort study was performed, based on [...] Read more.
Glucosamine is widely used around the world and as a popular dietary supplement and treatment in patients with osteoarthritis in China; however, the real-world cardiovascular risk of glucosamine in long-term use is still unclear. A retrospective, population-based cohort study was performed, based on the Beijing Medical Claim Data for Employees from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2017. Patients newly diagnosed with osteoarthritis were selected and divided into glucosamine users and non- glucosamine users. The glucosamine users group was further divided into adherent, partially adherent, and non-adherent groups according to the medication adherence. New-onset cardiovascular diseases (CVD) events, coronary heart diseases (CHD), and stroke, were identified during the observational period. COX proportional regression models were used to estimate the risks. Of the 685,778 patients newly diagnosed with osteoarthritis including 240,419 glucosamine users and 445,359 non-users, the mean age was 56.49 (SD: 14.45) years and 59.35% were females. During a median follow-up of 6.13 years, 64,600 new-onset CVD, 26,530 CHD, and 17,832 stroke events occurred. Glucosamine usage was significantly associated with CVD (HR: 1.10; 95% CI: 1.08–1.11) and CHD (HR: 1.12; 95% CI: 1.09–1.15), but not with stroke (HR: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.99–1.06). The highest CVD risk was shown in the adherent group (HR: 1.68; 95% CI: 1.59–1.78), followed by the partially adherent group (HR: 1.26, 95% CI: 1.22–1.30), and the non-adherent group (HR: 1.03; 95% CI: 1.02–1.05), with a significant dose–response relationship (p-trend < 0.001). In this longitudinal study, adherent usage of glucosamine was significantly associated with a higher risk for cardiovascular diseases in patients with osteoarthritis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplements in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 2807 KiB  
Article
Water-Soluble Tomato Concentrate, a Potential Antioxidant Supplement, Can Attenuate Platelet Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress in Healthy Middle-Aged and Elderly Adults: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Crossover Clinical Trial
by Zezhong Tian, Kongyao Li, Die Fan, Xiaoli Gao, Xilin Ma, Yimin Zhao, Dan Zhao, Ying Liang, Qiuhua Ji, Yiting Chen and Yan Yang
Nutrients 2022, 14(16), 3374; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14163374 - 17 Aug 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2432
Abstract
Increased oxidative stress and platelet apoptotic in middle-aged and elderly adults are important risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Therefore, it is of great significance to control the oxidative stress and platelet apoptosis in middle-aged and elderly adults. Previous acute clinical trials [...] Read more.
Increased oxidative stress and platelet apoptotic in middle-aged and elderly adults are important risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Therefore, it is of great significance to control the oxidative stress and platelet apoptosis in middle-aged and elderly adults. Previous acute clinical trials have shown that water-soluble tomato concentrate (WSTC) from fresh tomatoes could exert antiplatelet benefits after 3 h or 7 h, but its effects on platelet apoptosis and oxidative stress are still unknown, especially in healthy middle-aged and elderly adults. This current study aimed to examine the efficacies of WSTC on platelet apoptosis and oxidative stress in healthy middle-aged and elderly adults via a randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled crossover clinical trial (10 weeks in total). A total of 52 healthy middle-aged and elderly adults completed this trial. The results showed that WSTC could increase the serum total antioxidant capacity levels (p < 0.05) and decrease the serum malondialdehyde levels (p < 0.05) after a 4-week WSTC supplementation in healthy middle-aged and elderly adults. Platelet endogenous reactive oxygen species generation (p < 0.05), mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation (p < 0.05) and phosphatidylserine exposure (p < 0.05) were attenuated. In addition, our present study also found that WSTC could inhibit platelet aggregation and activation induced by collagen or ADP after intervention (p < 0.05), while having no effects on adverse events (p > 0.05). The results suggest that WSTC can inhibit oxidative stress and its related platelet apoptosis, which may provide a basis for the primary prevention of WSTC in ASCVD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplements in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

11 pages, 823 KiB  
Article
Effect of Dietary Supplementation with Eufortyn® Colesterolo Plus on Serum Lipids, Endothelial Reactivity, Indexes of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Systemic Inflammation in Healthy Subjects with Polygenic Hypercholesterolemia: The ANEMONE Study
by Federica Fogacci, Elisabetta Rizzoli, Marina Giovannini, Marilisa Bove, Sergio D’Addato, Claudio Borghi and Arrigo F. G. Cicero
Nutrients 2022, 14(10), 2099; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14102099 - 18 May 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3433
Abstract
We aimed to evaluate if dietary supplementation with a nutraceutical compound (Eufortyn® Colesterolo Plus) containing standardized bergamot polyphenolic fraction phytosome (Vazguard®), artichoke extract (Pycrinil®), artichoke dry extract. (Cynara scolymus L.), Q10 phytosome(Ubiqosome®) and zinc, could [...] Read more.
We aimed to evaluate if dietary supplementation with a nutraceutical compound (Eufortyn® Colesterolo Plus) containing standardized bergamot polyphenolic fraction phytosome (Vazguard®), artichoke extract (Pycrinil®), artichoke dry extract. (Cynara scolymus L.), Q10 phytosome(Ubiqosome®) and zinc, could positively affect serum lipids concentration, systemic inflammation and indexes of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in 60 healthy subjects with polygenic hypercholesterolemia. Participants were adhering to a low-fat, low-sodium Mediterranean diet for a month before being randomly allocated to 8-week treatment with 1 pill each day of either Eufortyn® Colesterolo Plus or placebo. Dietary supplementation with Eufortyn® Colesterolo Plus was associated with significant improvement in total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and endothelial reactivity (ER) in comparison with baseline, and with significant reductions in waist circumference, TC, LDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C, lipid accumulation product and fatty liver index compared to placebo. The study shows that dietary supplementation with standardized bergamot polyphenolic fraction phytosome, artichoke extracts, Q10 phytosome and zinc safely exerts significant improvements in serum lipids, systemic inflammation, indexes of NAFLD and endothelial reactivity in healthy subjects with moderate hypercholesterolemia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplements in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases)
Show Figures

Figure 1

9 pages, 656 KiB  
Article
Comparative Effect of Bergamot Polyphenolic Fraction and Red Yeast Rice Extract in Rats Fed a Hyperlipidemic Diet: Role of Antioxidant Properties and PCSK9 Expression
by Rocco Mollace, Roberta Macrì, Annamaria Tavernese, Micaela Gliozzi, Vincenzo Musolino, Cristina Carresi, Jessica Maiuolo, Massimo Fini, Maurizio Volterrani and Vincenzo Mollace
Nutrients 2022, 14(3), 477; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14030477 - 22 Jan 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 4098
Abstract
Elevated serum cholesterol levels, either associated or not with increased triglycerides, represent a risk of developing vascular injury, mostly leading to atherothrombosis-related diseases including myocardial infarction and stroke. Natural products have been investigated in the last few decades as they are seen to [...] Read more.
Elevated serum cholesterol levels, either associated or not with increased triglycerides, represent a risk of developing vascular injury, mostly leading to atherothrombosis-related diseases including myocardial infarction and stroke. Natural products have been investigated in the last few decades as they are seen to offer an alternative solution to counteract cardiometabolic risk, due to the occurrence of side effects with the use of statins, the leading drugs for treating hyperlipidemias. Red yeast rice (RYR), a monacolin K-rich natural extract, has been found to be effective in counteracting high cholesterol, being its use accompanied by consistent warnings by regulatory authorities based on the potential detrimental responses accompanying its statin-like chemical charcateristics. Here we compared the effects of RYR with those produced by bergamot polyphenolic fraction (BPF), a well-known natural extract proven to be effective in lowering both serum cholesterol and triglycerides in animals fed a hyperlipidemic diet. In particular, BPF at doses of 10 mg/Kg given orally for 30 consecutive days, counteracted the elevation of both serum LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglycerides induced by the hyperlipidemic diet, an effect which was accompanied by significant reductions of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione peroxidase serum levels, two biomarkers of oxidative stress. Furthermore, the activity of BPF was associated to increased HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) levels and to strong reduction of Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) levels which were found increased in hyperlipidemic rats. In contrast, RYR at doses of 1 and 3 mg/Kg, produced only significant reduction of LDL-C with very poor effects on triglycerides, HDL-C, glutathione peroxidase, MDA and PCSK9 expression. This indicates that while BPF and RYR both produce serum cholesterol-lowering benefits, BPF produces additional effects on triglycerides and HDL cholesterol compared to RYR at the doses used throughout the study. These additional effects of BPF appear to be related to the reduction of PCSK9 expression and to the antioxidant properties of this extract compared to RYR, thereby suggesting a more complete protection from cardiometabolic risk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplements in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 1973 KiB  
Article
The Role of 20-HETE, COX, Thromboxane Receptors, and Blood Plasma Antioxidant Status in Vascular Relaxation of Copper-Nanoparticle-Fed WKY Rats
by Michał Majewski, Jerzy Juśkiewicz, Magdalena Krajewska-Włodarczyk, Leszek Gromadziński, Katarzyna Socha, Ewelina Cholewińska and Katarzyna Ognik
Nutrients 2021, 13(11), 3793; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13113793 - 26 Oct 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2084
Abstract
Recently, the addition of copper nanoparticles (NPs) in a daily diet (6.5 mg/kg) was studied in different animal models as a possible alternative to ionic forms. Male Wistar–Kyoto rats (24-week-old, n = 11) were fed with copper, either in the form of carbonate [...] Read more.
Recently, the addition of copper nanoparticles (NPs) in a daily diet (6.5 mg/kg) was studied in different animal models as a possible alternative to ionic forms. Male Wistar–Kyoto rats (24-week-old, n = 11) were fed with copper, either in the form of carbonate salt (Cu6.5) or metal-based copper NPs (NP6.5), for 8 weeks. The third group was fed with a half dose of each (NP3.25 + Cu3.25). The thoracic aorta and blood plasma was studied. Supplementation with NP6.5 decreased the Cu (×0.7), Cu/Zn-ratio (×0.6) and catalase (CAT, ×0.7), and increased Zn (×1.2) and superoxide dismutase (SOD, ×1.4). Meanwhile, NP3.25 + Cu3.25 decreased the Cu/Zn-ratio (×0.7), and CAT (×0.7), and increased the daily feed intake (×1.06). Preincubation with either the selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, or the non-selective COX-1/2 inhibitor attenuated vasodilation of rat thoracic aorta in the NP6.5 group exclusively. However, an increased vasodilator response was observed in the NP6.5 and NP3.25 + Cu3.25 group of rats after preincubation with an inhibitor of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) formation, and the thromboxane receptor (TP) antagonist. Significant differences were observed between the NP6.5 and NP3.25 + Cu3.25 groups of rats in: dietary intake, acetylcholine-induced vasodilation, and response to COX-inhibitors. Copper NPs in a standard daily dose had more significant effects on the mechanism(s) responsible for the utilization of reactive oxygen species in the blood plasma with the participation of prostanoids derived from COX-2 in the vascular relaxation. Dietary copper NPs in both doses modified vasodilation through the vasoconstrictor 20-HETE and the TP receptors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplements in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 783 KiB  
Article
Effect of Dietary Coenzyme Q10 Plus NADH Supplementation on Fatigue Perception and Health-Related Quality of Life in Individuals with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial
by Jesús Castro-Marrero, Maria Jose Segundo, Marcos Lacasa, Alba Martinez-Martinez, Ramon Sanmartin Sentañes and Jose Alegre-Martin
Nutrients 2021, 13(8), 2658; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082658 - 30 Jul 2021
Cited by 24 | Viewed by 15599
Abstract
Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is a complex, multisystem, and profoundly debilitating neuroimmune disease, probably of post-viral multifactorial etiology. Unfortunately, no accurate diagnostic or laboratory tests have been established, nor are any universally effective approved drugs currently available for its treatment. This study [...] Read more.
Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is a complex, multisystem, and profoundly debilitating neuroimmune disease, probably of post-viral multifactorial etiology. Unfortunately, no accurate diagnostic or laboratory tests have been established, nor are any universally effective approved drugs currently available for its treatment. This study aimed to examine whether oral coenzyme Q10 and NADH (reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) co-supplementation could improve perceived fatigue, unrefreshing sleep, and health-related quality of life in ME/CFS patients. A 12-week prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in 207 patients with ME/CFS, who were randomly allocated to one of two groups to receive either 200 mg of CoQ10 and 20 mg of NADH (n = 104) or matching placebo (n = 103) once daily. Endpoints were simultaneously evaluated at baseline, and then reassessed at 4- and 8-week treatment visits and four weeks after treatment cessation, using validated patient-reported outcome measures. A significant reduction in cognitive fatigue perception and overall FIS-40 score (p < 0.001 and p = 0.022, respectively) and an improvement in HRQoL (health-related quality of life (SF-36)) (p < 0.05) from baseline were observed within the experimental group over time. Statistically significant differences were also shown for sleep duration at 4 weeks and habitual sleep efficiency at 8 weeks in follow-up visits from baseline within the experimental group (p = 0.018 and p = 0.038, respectively). Overall, these findings support the use of CoQ10 plus NADH supplementation as a potentially safe therapeutic option for reducing perceived cognitive fatigue and improving the health-related quality of life in ME/CFS patients. Future interventions are needed to corroborate these clinical benefits and also explore the underlying pathomechanisms of CoQ10 and NADH administration in ME/CFS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplements in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research, Other

18 pages, 1300 KiB  
Review
Functional Role of Taurine in Aging and Cardiovascular Health: An Updated Overview
by Gaetano Santulli, Urna Kansakar, Fahimeh Varzideh, Pasquale Mone, Stanislovas S. Jankauskas and Angela Lombardi
Nutrients 2023, 15(19), 4236; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15194236 - 30 Sep 2023
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 10403
Abstract
Taurine, a naturally occurring sulfur-containing amino acid, has attracted significant attention in recent years due to its potential health benefits. Found in various foods and often used in energy drinks and supplements, taurine has been studied extensively to understand its impact on human [...] Read more.
Taurine, a naturally occurring sulfur-containing amino acid, has attracted significant attention in recent years due to its potential health benefits. Found in various foods and often used in energy drinks and supplements, taurine has been studied extensively to understand its impact on human physiology. Determining its exact functional roles represents a complex and multifaceted topic. We provide an overview of the scientific literature and present an analysis of the effects of taurine on various aspects of human health, focusing on aging and cardiovascular pathophysiology, but also including athletic performance, metabolic regulation, and neurological function. Additionally, our report summarizes the current recommendations for taurine intake and addresses potential safety concerns. Evidence from both human and animal studies indicates that taurine may have beneficial cardiovascular effects, including blood pressure regulation, improved cardiac fitness, and enhanced vascular health. Its mechanisms of action and antioxidant properties make it also an intriguing candidate for potential anti-aging strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplements in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 1841 KiB  
Review
From Diabetes Care to Heart Failure Management: A Potential Therapeutic Approach Combining SGLT2 Inhibitors and Plant Extracts
by Micaela Gliozzi, Roberta Macrì, Anna Rita Coppoletta, Vincenzo Musolino, Cristina Carresi, Miriam Scicchitano, Francesca Bosco, Lorenza Guarnieri, Antonio Cardamone, Stefano Ruga, Federica Scarano, Saverio Nucera, Rocco Mollace, Irene Bava, Rosamaria Caminiti, Maria Serra, Jessica Maiuolo, Ernesto Palma and Vincenzo Mollace
Nutrients 2022, 14(18), 3737; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14183737 - 10 Sep 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2513
Abstract
Diabetes is a complex chronic disease, and among the affected patients, cardiovascular disease (CVD)is the most common cause of death. Consequently, the evidence for the cardiovascular benefit of glycaemic control may reduce long-term CVD rates. Over the years, multiple pharmacological approaches aimed at [...] Read more.
Diabetes is a complex chronic disease, and among the affected patients, cardiovascular disease (CVD)is the most common cause of death. Consequently, the evidence for the cardiovascular benefit of glycaemic control may reduce long-term CVD rates. Over the years, multiple pharmacological approaches aimed at controlling blood glucose levels were unable to significantly reduce diabetes-related cardiovascular events. In this view, a therapeutic strategy combining SGLT2 inhibitors and plant extracts might represent a promising solution. Indeed, countering the main cardiometabolic risk factor using plant extracts could potentiate the cardioprotective action of SGLT2 inhibitors. This review highlights the main molecular mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects that could contribute to the better management of diabetic patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplements in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Other

16 pages, 2044 KiB  
Systematic Review
Astaxanthin Influence on Health Outcomes of Adults at Risk of Metabolic Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Leona Yuen-Ling Leung, Sidney Man-Ngai Chan, Hon-Lon Tam and Emily Sze-Wan Wong
Nutrients 2022, 14(10), 2050; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14102050 - 13 May 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 5100
Abstract
The use of medication is effective in managing metabolic syndrome (MetS), but side effects have led to increased attention on using nutraceuticals and supplements. Astaxanthin shows positive effects in reducing the risk of MetS, but results from individual studies are inconclusive. This systematic [...] Read more.
The use of medication is effective in managing metabolic syndrome (MetS), but side effects have led to increased attention on using nutraceuticals and supplements. Astaxanthin shows positive effects in reducing the risk of MetS, but results from individual studies are inconclusive. This systematic review summarizes the latest evidence of astaxanthin in adults with risk factors of MetS. A systematic search of English and Chinese randomized controlled trials in 14 electronic databases from inception to 30 June 2021 was performed. Two reviewers independently screened the titles and abstracts, and conducted full-text review, quality appraisal, and extraction of data. Risk of bias was assessed by PEDro. A total of 7 studies met the inclusion criteria with 321 participants. Six studies were rated to have excellent methodological quality, while the remaining one was rated at good. Results show marginal effects of astaxanthin on reduction in total cholesterol and systolic blood pressure, and a significant attenuating effect on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Further robust evidence is needed to examine the effects of astaxanthin in adults at risk of MetS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplements in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop