nutrients-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

New Advances in Effect of Natural Compounds on Vascular Inflammation, Aging and Cardiovascular Disease

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2024) | Viewed by 19401

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Sciences and Technologies, University of Sannio, Benevento, Italy
2. Institute Clinici Scientifici Maugeri IRCCS, Cardiac Rehabilitation Unit of Telese Terme Institute, 82037 Telese Terme, Benevento, Italy
Interests: molecular bases of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases; atherosclerosis; biochemistry of human nutrition; epigenetics; gene expression

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Research Council, Institute of Food Sciences, 83100 Avellino, Italy
Interests: phytochemicals; polyphenols; disease prevention; health; oxidative stress; aging; chemoprevention; neuroprotection

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Sciences and Technologies, University of Sannio, Via De Sanctis, 82100 Benevento, Italy
Interests: role of genetic, epigenetic and extra-genetic factors on the development cardiovascular disease; effect of phytochemicals on endothelial dysfunction; sirtuins and cardiovascular health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Natural compounds have always been a primary resource for humans to cure diseases and preserve good health. At present, population aging and the increasing demand of wellbeing and healthy longevity in a large part of the world promote a growing interest in identifying natural molecules and their biological effects that could ameliorate or prevent chronic common diseases, age-related diseases, and mental-physical decline. The following Special Issue aims to provide deeper insight into the most recent advances in the characterization of natural compounds for the treatment and prevention of vascular inflammation, cardiovascular disease, and age-related conditions. Vascular inflammation underlies a variety of diseases and plays a central role in the development of cardiovascular disease, which is still the leading cause of death worldwide. Age-related mental and physical failures and diseases are a major burden at the individual and societal level, and are often strictly related to vascular inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. Although many natural compounds that could be useful in these conditions have already been characterized, further investigations and validations are still needed, and the drive remains to identify novel natural molecules with higher clinical safety and efficacy profiles for the life-long treatment of a large part of the global population.

This Special Issue of Nutrients entitled “New Advances in Effect of Natural Compounds on Vascular Inflammation, Aging and Cardiovascular Disease” welcomes original research papers and reviews of the literature concerning this important topic.

Prof. Dr. Francesco Paolo Mancini
Dr. Carmela Spagnuolo
Dr. Alberto Zullo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • phytochemicals
  • natural compounds
  • polyphenols
  • aging
  • age-related diseases
  • vascular inflammation
  • endothelial dysfunction
  • cardiovascular disease
  • inflammation
  • cardiometabolic health

Published Papers (8 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

20 pages, 3405 KiB  
Article
Identification and Characterization of Neuroprotective Properties of Thaumatin-like Protein 1a from Annurca Apple Flesh Polyphenol Extract
by Antonio D’Errico, Rosarita Nasso, Antimo Di Maro, Nicola Landi, Angela Chambery, Rosita Russo, Stefania D’Angelo, Mariorosario Masullo and Rosaria Arcone
Nutrients 2024, 16(2), 307; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16020307 - 19 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1203
Abstract
Background: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) are multifactorial neurodegenerative disorders that are mostly treated with drugs inhibiting key enzymes of cholinergic and aminergic neurotransmission, such as acetyl and butyryl cholinesterase (AChE, BuChE) or monoamine oxidases (MAO)-A/B, and of Aβ  [...] Read more.
Background: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) are multifactorial neurodegenerative disorders that are mostly treated with drugs inhibiting key enzymes of cholinergic and aminergic neurotransmission, such as acetyl and butyryl cholinesterase (AChE, BuChE) or monoamine oxidases (MAO)-A/B, and of Aβ 1–40 aggregation. Diet plant components with multitarget functions are promising compounds in the prevention of AD and PD. Our aim was to identify neuroprotective compounds from Annurca apple polyphenol extract (AFPE). Methods: AFPE was fractionated by gel filtration, and the eluted peaks were subjected to chemical analyses (i.e., RP-HPLC and mass spectrometry), determination of inhibitory enzyme activity and cell effects by MTT, and morphology assays. Results: In AFPE, we identified thaumatin-like protein 1a, belonging to the pathogenesis-related protein (PR) family. This protein showed the best inhibitory activity on AChE, MAO-A (IC50 = 5.53 µM and 1.71 µM, respectively), and Aβ1–40 fibril aggregation (IC50 = 9.16 µM), compared to AFPE and other polyphenol-containing fractions. Among the latter, Peak 4 reverted Aβ fibril formation (IC50 = 104.87 µM). Moreover, thaumatin-like protein 1a protected AGS and MKN-28 cells from serum-deprivation-induced stress conditions. Conclusions: We showed that AFPE exerted neuroprotective functions not only through its polyphenols but also through thaumatin-like protein 1a, which acted like a multitarget molecule. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

22 pages, 1612 KiB  
Article
Regular Consumption of Cocoa and Red Berries as a Strategy to Improve Cardiovascular Biomarkers via Modulation of Microbiota Metabolism in Healthy Aging Adults
by Joaquín García-Cordero, Alba Martinez, Carlos Blanco-Valverde, Alicia Pino, Verónica Puertas-Martín, Ricardo San Román and Sonia de Pascual-Teresa
Nutrients 2023, 15(10), 2299; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15102299 - 13 May 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3306
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of cocoa flavanols and red berry anthocyanins on cardiovascular biomarkers, such as homocysteine, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), nitric oxide (NO), flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD), blood pressure and lipid profile. Additionally, we aimed to ascertain [...] Read more.
The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of cocoa flavanols and red berry anthocyanins on cardiovascular biomarkers, such as homocysteine, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), nitric oxide (NO), flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD), blood pressure and lipid profile. Additionally, we aimed to ascertain their possible interactions with microbiota related metabolites, such as secondary bile acids (SBA), short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). A randomized, parallel-group study, single-blind for the research team, was performed on 60 healthy volunteers between the ages of 45 and 85, who consumed 2.5 g/day of cocoa powder (9.59 mg/day of total flavanols), 5 g/day of a red berry mixture (13.9 mg/day of total anthocyanins) or 7.5 g/day of a combination of both for 12 weeks. The group that had consumed cocoa showed a significant reduction in TMAO (p = 0.03) and uric acid (p = 0.01) levels in serum, accompanied by an increase in FMD values (p = 0.03) and total polyphenols. corrected by creatinine (p = 0.03) after the intervention. These latter values negatively correlated with the TMAO concentration (R = −0.57, p = 0.02). Additionally, we observed an increase in carbohydrate fermentation in the groups that had consumed cocoa (p = 0.04) and red berries (p = 0.04) between the beginning and the end of the intervention. This increase in carbohydrate fermentation was correlated with lower levels of TC/HDL ratio (p = 0.01), systolic (p = 0.01) and diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.01). In conclusion, our study showed a positive modulation of microbiota metabolism after a regular intake of cocoa flavanols and red berry anthocyanins that led to an improvement in cardiovascular function, especially in the group that consumed cocoa. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

20 pages, 3275 KiB  
Article
Phenolic Extract from Extra Virgin Olive Oil Induces Different Anti-Proliferative Pathways in Human Bladder Cancer Cell Lines
by Carmela Spagnuolo, Stefania Moccia, Idolo Tedesco, Giuseppina Crescente, Maria Grazia Volpe, Maria Russo and Gian Luigi Russo
Nutrients 2023, 15(1), 182; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15010182 - 30 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2518
Abstract
Regular consumption of olive oil is associated with protection against chronic-degenerative diseases, such as cancer. Epidemiological evidence indicates an inverse association between olive oil intake and bladder cancer risk. Bladder cancer is among the most common forms of cancer; in particular, the transitional [...] Read more.
Regular consumption of olive oil is associated with protection against chronic-degenerative diseases, such as cancer. Epidemiological evidence indicates an inverse association between olive oil intake and bladder cancer risk. Bladder cancer is among the most common forms of cancer; in particular, the transitional cell carcinoma histotype shows aggressive behavior. We investigated the anti-proliferative effects of a phenolic extract prepared from an extra virgin olive oil (EVOOE) on two human bladder cancer cell lines, namely RT112 and J82, representing the progression from low-grade to high-grade tumors, respectively. In RT112, the EVOOE reduced cell viability (IC50 = 240 μg/mL at 24 h), triggering a non-protective form of autophagy, evidenced by the autophagosome formation and the increase in LC-3 lipidation. In J82, EVOOE induced a strong decrease in cell viability after 24 h of treatment (IC50 = 65.8 μg/mL) through rapid and massive apoptosis, assessed by Annexin V positivity and caspase-3 and -9 activation. Moreover, in both bladder cancer cell lines, EVOOE reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species, but this antioxidant effect was not correlated with its anti-proliferative outcomes. Data obtained suggest that the mixture of phenolic compounds in extra virgin olive oil activates different anti-proliferative pathways. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

20 pages, 5652 KiB  
Article
Milk Exosomal miR-27b Worsen Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Mediated Colorectal Cancer Cell Death
by Elisa Martino, Anna Balestrieri, Luigi Mele, Celestino Sardu, Raffaele Marfella, Nunzia D’Onofrio, Giuseppe Campanile and Maria Luisa Balestrieri
Nutrients 2022, 14(23), 5081; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14235081 - 29 Nov 2022
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 3011
Abstract
The relationship between dietary constituents and the onset and prevention of colorectal cancer (CRC) is constantly growing. Recently, the antineoplastic profiles of milk and whey from Mediterranean buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) have been brought to attention. However, to date, compared to cow [...] Read more.
The relationship between dietary constituents and the onset and prevention of colorectal cancer (CRC) is constantly growing. Recently, the antineoplastic profiles of milk and whey from Mediterranean buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) have been brought to attention. However, to date, compared to cow milk, the potential health benefits of buffalo milk exosome-miRNA are still little explored. In the present study, we profiled the exosomal miRNA from buffalo milk and investigated the possible anticancer effects in CRC cells, HCT116, and HT-29. Results indicated that buffalo milk exosomes contained higher levels of miR-27b, miR-15b, and miR-148a compared to cow milk. Mimic miR-27b transfection in CRC cells induced higher cytotoxic effects (p < 0.01) compared to miR-15b and miR-148a. Moreover, miR-27b overexpression in HCT116 and HT-29 cells (miR-27b+) induced apoptosis, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), and lysosome accumulation. Exposure of miR-27b+ cells to the bioactive 3kDa milk extract aggravated the apoptosis rate (p < 0.01), mitochondrial stress (p < 0.01), and advanced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress (p < 0.01), via PERK/IRE1/XBP1 and CHOP protein modulation (p < 0.01). Moreover, GSK2606414, the ER-inhibitor (ER-i), decreased the apoptosis phenomenon and XBP1 and CHOP modulation in miR-27b+ cells treated with milk (p < 0.01 vs. miR-27b++Milk), suggesting the ER stress as a cell-death-aggravating mechanism. These results support the in vitro anticancer activity of 3kDa milk extract and unveil the contribution of miR-27b in the promising beneficial effect of buffalo milk in CRC prevention. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

0 pages, 2912 KiB  
Article
Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Geraniol Isolated from Lemon Grass on Ox-LDL-Stimulated Endothelial Cells by Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 via PI3K/Akt and Nrf-2 Signaling Pathways
by Rebai Ben Ammar, Maged Elsayed Mohamed, Manal Alfwuaires, Sarah Abdulaziz Alamer, Mohammad Bani Ismail, Vishnu Priya Veeraraghavan, Ashok Kumar Sekar, Riadh Ksouri and Peramaiyan Rajendran
Nutrients 2022, 14(22), 4817; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14224817 - 14 Nov 2022
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2196 | Correction
Abstract
Among the world’s leading causes of cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that affects the arteries. Both vasodilation and vasoconstriction, low levels of nitric oxide and high levels of reactive oxygen species and pro-inflammatory factors characterize dysfunctional blood vessels. Hypertension, and [...] Read more.
Among the world’s leading causes of cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that affects the arteries. Both vasodilation and vasoconstriction, low levels of nitric oxide and high levels of reactive oxygen species and pro-inflammatory factors characterize dysfunctional blood vessels. Hypertension, and atherosclerosis, all start with this dysfunction. Geraniol, a compound of acyclic monoterpene alcohol, found in plants such as geranium, lemongrass and rose, is a primary constituent of essential oils. It shows a variety of pharmacological properties. This study aimed to investigate the impact of geraniol on Ox-LDL-induced stress and inflammation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In this study, HUVECs were treated with Ox-LDL or geraniol at different dose concentrations. MTT assay, Western blot, ROS generation and DNA fragmentation were used to evaluate geraniol’s effects on Ox-LDL-induced HUVECs inflammation. The results show that geraniol pre-incubation ameliorates Ox-LDL-mediated HUVECs cytotoxicity and DNA fragmentation. The geraniol inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by Ox-LDL, including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β. In Ox-LDL-stimulated HUVECs, geraniol suppresses the nuclear translocation and activity of NF-ᴋB as well as phosphorylation of IkBα. Moreover, geraniol activated the PI3K/AKT/NRF2 pathway in HUVECs, resulting in an increase in the expression of HO-1. Taking our data together, we can conclude that, in HUVECs, geraniol inhibits Ox-LDL-induced inflammation and oxidative stress by targeting PI3/AKT/NRF2. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

19 pages, 2922 KiB  
Review
Research Progress on the Anti-Aging Potential of the Active Components of Ginseng
by Jingqian Su, Qiaofen Su, Shan Hu, Xinglin Ruan and Songying Ouyang
Nutrients 2023, 15(15), 3286; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15153286 - 25 Jul 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3253
Abstract
Aging is a cellular state characterized by a permanent cessation of cell division and evasion of apoptosis. DNA damage, metabolic dysfunction, telomere damage, and mitochondrial dysfunction are the main factors associated with senescence. Aging increases β-galactosidase activity, enhances cell spreading, and induces Lamin [...] Read more.
Aging is a cellular state characterized by a permanent cessation of cell division and evasion of apoptosis. DNA damage, metabolic dysfunction, telomere damage, and mitochondrial dysfunction are the main factors associated with senescence. Aging increases β-galactosidase activity, enhances cell spreading, and induces Lamin B1 loss, which further accelerate the aging process. It is associated with a variety of diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s, type 2 diabetes, and chronic inflammation. Ginseng is a traditional Chinese medicine with anti-aging effects. The active components of ginseng, including saponins, polysaccharides, and active peptides, have antioxidant, anti-apoptotic, neuroprotective, and age-delaying effects. DNA damage is the main factor associated with aging, and the mechanism through which the active ingredients of ginseng reduce DNA damage and delay aging has not been comprehensively described. This review focuses on the anti-aging mechanisms of the active ingredients of ginseng. Furthermore, it broadens the scope of ideas for further research on natural products and aging. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

23 pages, 1416 KiB  
Review
Anti-Angiogenic Effects of Natural Compounds in Diet-Associated Hepatic Inflammation
by Sara Novi, Vincenzo Vestuto, Pietro Campiglia, Nicola Tecce, Alessia Bertamino and Mario Felice Tecce
Nutrients 2023, 15(12), 2748; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15122748 - 14 Jun 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2225
Abstract
Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are the most common causes of chronic liver disease and are increasingly emerging as a global health problem. Such disorders can lead to liver damage, resulting in the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and [...] Read more.
Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are the most common causes of chronic liver disease and are increasingly emerging as a global health problem. Such disorders can lead to liver damage, resulting in the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the activation of infiltrating immune cells. These are some of the common features of ALD progression in ASH (alcoholic steatohepatitis) and NAFLD to NASH (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis). Hepatic steatosis, followed by fibrosis, lead to a continuous progression accompanied by angiogenesis. This process creates hypoxia, which activates vascular factors, initiating pathological angiogenesis and further fibrosis. This forms a vicious cycle of ongoing damage and progression. This condition further exacerbates liver injury and may contribute to the development of comorbidities, such as metabolic syndrome as well as hepatocellular carcinoma. Increasing evidence suggests that anti-angiogenic therapy may have beneficial effects on these hepatic disorders and their exacerbation. Therefore, there is a great interest to deepen the knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of natural anti-angiogenic products that could both prevent and control liver diseases. In this review, we focus on the role of major natural anti-angiogenic compounds against steatohepatitis and determine their potential therapeutic benefits in the treatment of liver inflammation caused by an imbalanced diet. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

3 pages, 1436 KiB  
Correction
Correction: Ben Ammar et al. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Geraniol Isolated from Lemon Grass on Ox-LDL-Stimulated Endothelial Cells by Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 via PI3K/Akt and Nrf-2 Signaling Pathways. Nutrients 2022, 14, 4817
by Rebai Ben Ammar, Maged Elsayed Mohamed, Manal Alfwuaires, Sarah Abdulaziz Alamer, Mohammad Bani Ismail, Vishnu Priya Veeraraghavan, Ashok Kumar Sekar, Riadh Ksouri and Peramaiyan Rajendran
Nutrients 2024, 16(5), 596; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16050596 - 22 Feb 2024
Viewed by 534
Abstract
In the original publication [...] Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop