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Oxidative Stress and Protective Effects of Natural Products in Health

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (5 January 2024) | Viewed by 21469

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong 999077, China
Interests: intestine flora; microorganisms; flavonoid; metabolic diseases; natural products; herbal medicine; osteoporosis; metabolomics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Oxidative stress is a negative effect induced by free radicals in the body and is thought to be the most important risk factor for human aging and various diseases, such as tumors, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's disease), diabetes, and other diseases. Over the past 20 years, the study of oxidative stress has undoubtedly been a hot spot in basic research. Some foods, herbal medicines, and dietary supplements (such as red wine, tea, soy protein, and EGCG) are rich in natural ingredients which are considered to have good antioxidative effects. Some of these foods and supplements are ingested daily; therefore, the effects of natural products in foods and herbal medicines on health and the underlying mechanisms via antioxidative stress are of universal appeal.

This Special Issue of Nutrients, entitled “Oxidative Stress and Protective Effects of Natural Products in Health”, aims to collect high-quality researches which cover the associations between oxidative stress and health, the antioxidative effects of natural products derived from foods and herbal medicines, and the deep mechanism researches in this field. We welcome different types of manuscripts, including preclinical and clinical research articles and systematic reviews.

Dr. Huihui Xiao
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • oxidative stress
  • food
  • herbal medicine
  • natural products
  • aging
  • tumors
  • cardiovascular diseases
  • diabetes
  • neurodegenerative diseases
  • inflammation
  • reactive oxygen species
  • reactive nitrogen species
  • signaling pathway

Published Papers (12 papers)

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Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review, Other

3 pages, 196 KiB  
Editorial
The Role of Oxidative Stress and Natural Products in Maintaining Human Health
by Hui-Hui Xiao
Nutrients 2024, 16(9), 1268; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16091268 (registering DOI) - 25 Apr 2024
Abstract
Since 1985, when oxidative stress was first defined as the oxidative damage caused to cells and organs, a large number of studies have shown that oxidative stress is a significant risk factor for various diseases, including tumors [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress and Protective Effects of Natural Products in Health)

Research

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30 pages, 2580 KiB  
Article
Genetic Variability Impacts Genotoxic and Transcriptome Responses in the Human Colon after the Consumption of Processed Red Meat Products and Those with Added Phytochemical Extracts
by Julia N. DeBenedictis, Esther Baars, Juan Ochoteco-Asensio, Simone G. van Breda and Theo M. de Kok
Nutrients 2024, 16(3), 425; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16030425 - 31 Jan 2024
Viewed by 922
Abstract
The PHYTOME study investigated the effect of consuming processed meat products on outcomes related to colorectal cancer risk without testing the impact of genetic variability on these responses. This research aims to elucidate the genetic impact on apparent total N-nitroso compound (ATNC) excretion, [...] Read more.
The PHYTOME study investigated the effect of consuming processed meat products on outcomes related to colorectal cancer risk without testing the impact of genetic variability on these responses. This research aims to elucidate the genetic impact on apparent total N-nitroso compound (ATNC) excretion, colonic DNA adduct formation, ex vivo-induced DNA damage, and gene expression changes in colon biopsies of healthy participants. Through a systematic literature review, candidate polymorphisms were selected and then detected using TaqMan and PCR analysis. The effect of genotype on study outcomes was determined via a linear mixed model and analysis of variance. Machine learning was used to evaluate relative allele importance concerning genotoxic responses, which established a ranking of the most protective alleles and a combination of genotypes (gene scores). Participants were grouped by GSTM1 genotype and differentially expressed genes (DEGs), and overrepresented biological pathways were compared between groups. Stratifying participants by ten relevant genes revealed significant variations in outcome responses. After consumption of processed red meat, variations in NQO1 and COMT impacted responses in ATNC levels (µmol/L) (+9.56 for wildtype vs. heterozygous) and DNA adduct levels (pg/µg DNA) (+1.26 for variant vs. wildtype and +0.43 for variant vs. heterozygous), respectively. After phytochemicals were added to the meat, GSTM1 variation impacted changes in DNA adduct levels (−6.12 for deletion vs. wildtype). The gene scores correlated with these responses and DEGs were identified by GSTM1 genotype. The altered pathways specific to the GSTM1 wildtype group included ‘metabolism’, ‘cell cycle’, ‘vitamin D receptor’, and ‘metabolism of water-soluble vitamins and co-factors’. Genotype impacted both the potential genotoxicity of processed red meat and the efficacy of protective phytochemical extracts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress and Protective Effects of Natural Products in Health)
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17 pages, 6537 KiB  
Article
Neuroprotective Effects of N-methyl-(2S, 4R)-trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline (NMP) against Amyloid-β-Induced Alzheimer’s Disease Mouse Model
by Jawad Ali, Amjad Khan, Jun Sung Park, Muhammad Tahir, Waqas Ahmad, Kyonghwan Choe and Myeong Ok Kim
Nutrients 2023, 15(23), 4986; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15234986 - 01 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1360
Abstract
Alzheimer’s disease (AD), is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that involves the deposition of β-amyloid plaques and the clinical symptoms of confusion, memory loss, and cognitive dysfunction. Despite enormous progress in the field, no curative treatment is available. Therefore, the current study was designed [...] Read more.
Alzheimer’s disease (AD), is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that involves the deposition of β-amyloid plaques and the clinical symptoms of confusion, memory loss, and cognitive dysfunction. Despite enormous progress in the field, no curative treatment is available. Therefore, the current study was designed to determine the neuroprotective effects of N-methyl-(2S, 4R)-Trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline (NMP) obtained from Sideroxylon obtusifolium, a Brazilian folk medicine with anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties. Here, for the first time, we explored the neuroprotective role of NMP in the Aβ1–42-injected mouse model of AD. After acclimatization, a single intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ1–42 (5 µL/5 min/mouse) in C57BL/6N mice induced significant amyloidogenesis, reactive gliosis, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and synaptic and memory deficits. However, an intraperitoneal injection of NMP at a dose of (50 mg/kg/day) for three consecutive weeks remarkably decreased beta secretase1 (BACE-1) and Aβ, activated the astrocyte and microglia expression level as well as downstream inflammatory mediators such as pNF-ĸB, TNF-α, and IL-1β. NPM also strongly attenuated oxidative stress, as evaluated by the expression level of NRF2/HO-1, and synaptic failure, by improving the level of both the presynaptic (SNAP-25 and SYN) and postsynaptic (PSD-95 and SNAP-23) regions of the synapses in the cortexes and hippocampi of the Aβ1–42-injected mice, contributing to cognitive improvement in AD and improving the behavioral deficits displayed in the Morris water maze and Y-maze. Overall, our data suggest that NMP provides potent multifactorial effects, including the inhibition of amyloid plaques, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and cognitive deficits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress and Protective Effects of Natural Products in Health)
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28 pages, 14717 KiB  
Article
The Nephroprotective Effect of Cornelian Cherry (Cornus mas L.) and Rowanberry (Sorbus aucuparia L.) in Gentamicin-Induced Nephrotoxicity on Wistar Rats with Emphasis on the Evaluation of Novel Renal Biomarkers and the Antioxidant Capacity in Correlation with Nitro-Oxidative Stress
by Mara Aurori, Sanda Andrei, Alexandra Iulia Dreanca, Andreea Georgiana Morohoschi, Mihaela Cotul, Mihaela Niculae, Monica Irina Nan, Andrei Răzvan Codea and Adrian Florin Gal
Nutrients 2023, 15(20), 4392; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15204392 - 16 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1223
Abstract
In spite of its well-known nephrotoxicity, gentamicin is nonetheless routinely used in humans and animals. However, no adjuvant treatments have been implemented to mitigate this harmful effect. Given this concern, medicinal plants represent a significant reservoir of natural antioxidants that could potentially reduce [...] Read more.
In spite of its well-known nephrotoxicity, gentamicin is nonetheless routinely used in humans and animals. However, no adjuvant treatments have been implemented to mitigate this harmful effect. Given this concern, medicinal plants represent a significant reservoir of natural antioxidants that could potentially reduce the renal oxidative stress induced by gentamicin. Therefore, the main objective of this research was to investigate the nephroprotective properties of Cornus mas and Sorbus aucuparia fruits in an experimental model of nephrotoxicity. The 3-week study was performed on male Wistar rats, which were randomly divided into six experimental groups, being subcutaneously treated with 50 mg/kg gentamicin and orally given Cornus mas and Sorbus aucuparia extracts, in doses of 40 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg, respectively. Antioxidant therapy significantly improved the nitro-oxidative stress parameters as well as the specific renal biomarkers KIM-1 and iNAG, demonstrating a considerable renal tubular protective impact. These outcomes were reinforced by biochemical and histopathological enhancements. Nevertheless, neither of the tested extracts succeeded in substantially diminishing BUN levels. Additionally, CysC did not significantly decline following extracts treatment, suggesting that the remedies did not effectively protect renal glomeruli against gentamicin stress. Future studies are required in order to determine the underlying mechanisms of these berries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress and Protective Effects of Natural Products in Health)
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16 pages, 23773 KiB  
Article
Dihydro-Resveratrol Attenuates Oxidative Stress, Adipogenesis and Insulin Resistance in In Vitro Models and High-Fat Diet-Induced Mouse Model via AMPK Activation
by Chu-Shing Lam, Yi-Xuan Xia, Bai-Sen Chen, Yin-Xiao Du, Kang-Lun Liu and Hong-Jie Zhang
Nutrients 2023, 15(13), 3006; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15133006 - 30 Jun 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2013
Abstract
Management of obesity has become a prevalent strategy for preventing the diseases closely integrated with excess body weight such as diabetes over the last half century. Searching for therapeutic agents acting on oxidative stress, adipogenesis and insulin resistance is considered as an efficient [...] Read more.
Management of obesity has become a prevalent strategy for preventing the diseases closely integrated with excess body weight such as diabetes over the last half century. Searching for therapeutic agents acting on oxidative stress, adipogenesis and insulin resistance is considered as an efficient approach to control obesity-related diseases. The present study was designed to examine the in vitro and in vivo effects of dihydro-resveratrol (DR2), a naturally occurring compound from Dendrobium medicinal plants, on oxidative stress aggravation, adipogenesis, lipogenesis and insulin sensitivity. We utilized an in vitro 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation model to show that DR2 could reduce pre-adipocyte maturation by activation of AMPK/SIRT1 signaling proteins to inhibit p38MAPK proteins. With the use of in vitro oxidative-stress-induced hepatocytes and myoblasts models, DR2 was also shown to be able to reduce oxidative stress aggravation through mediation of Nrf2-related antioxidative cascade, reduce intracellular lipid accumulation through phosphorylation of ACC protein, reduce lipid peroxidation in hepatocytes and promote insulin sensitivity via activation of AKT protein in the insulin-resistant HepG2 cells and C2C12 cells. The effects of DR2 on adipogenesis, lipid accumulation, insulin resistance and blood glucose clearance were further demonstrated in the high-fat diet-induced obesity mouse model. Our in vitro and in vivo studies determined that DR2 could contain therapeutic potential for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress and Protective Effects of Natural Products in Health)
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15 pages, 14920 KiB  
Article
Glabridin Ameliorates Alcohol-Caused Liver Damage by Reducing Oxidative Stress and Inflammation via p38 MAPK/Nrf2/NF-κB Pathway
by Mengyao Wang, Feng Zhang, Jie Zhou, Ke Gong, Shasha Chen, Xinran Zhu, Mengxue Zhang, Yajun Duan, Chenzhong Liao, Jihong Han and Zequn Yin
Nutrients 2023, 15(9), 2157; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15092157 - 30 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1869
Abstract
Licorice is a traditional and versatile herbal medicine and food. Glabridin (Gla) is a kind of isoflavone extracted from the licorice root, which has anti-obesity, anti-atherosclerotic, and antioxidative effects. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a widespread liver disease induced by chronic alcohol consumption. [...] Read more.
Licorice is a traditional and versatile herbal medicine and food. Glabridin (Gla) is a kind of isoflavone extracted from the licorice root, which has anti-obesity, anti-atherosclerotic, and antioxidative effects. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a widespread liver disease induced by chronic alcohol consumption. However, studies demonstrating the effect of Gla on ALD are rare. The research explored the positive effect of Gla in C57BL/6J mice fed by the Lieber–DeCarli ethanol mice diet and HepG2 cells treated with ethanol. Gla alleviated ethanol-induced liver injury, including reducing liver vacuolation and lipid accumulation. The serum levels of inflammatory cytokines were decreased in the Gla-treated mice. The reactive oxygen species and apoptosis levels were attenuated and antioxidant enzyme activity levels were restored in ethanol-induced mice by Gla treatment. In vitro, Gla reduced ethanol-induced cytotoxicity, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) nuclear translocation, and enhanced nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation. Anisomycin (an agonist of p38 MAPK) eliminated the positive role of Gla on ethanol-caused oxidative stress and inflammation. On the whole, Gla can alleviate alcoholic liver damage via the p38 MAPK/Nrf2/NF-κB pathway and may be used as a novel health product or drug to potentially alleviate ALD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress and Protective Effects of Natural Products in Health)
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21 pages, 4755 KiB  
Article
Citrus × paradisi L. Fruit Waste: The Impact of Eco-Friendly Extraction Techniques on the Phytochemical and Antioxidant Potential
by Jolita Stabrauskiene, Mindaugas Marksa, Liudas Ivanauskas, Pranas Viskelis, Jonas Viskelis and Jurga Bernatoniene
Nutrients 2023, 15(5), 1276; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15051276 - 03 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2500
Abstract
Citrus fruits have been the subject of extensive research over the years due to their impressive antioxidant properties, the health benefits of flavanones, and their potential use in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. Grapefruit have been shown in studies to improve [...] Read more.
Citrus fruits have been the subject of extensive research over the years due to their impressive antioxidant properties, the health benefits of flavanones, and their potential use in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. Grapefruit have been shown in studies to improve overall health, with numerous potential benefits, including improved heart health, reduced risk of certain cancers, improved digestive health, and improved immune system function. The development of cyclodextrin complexes is an exciting approach to increasing the content of flavanones such as naringin and naringenin in the extraction medium while improving the profile of beneficial phenolic compounds and the antioxidant profile. This research aims to optimize the extraction conditions of the flavanones naringin and naringenin with additional compounds to increase their yield from different parts of grapefruit (Citrus × paradisi L.) fruits, such as albedo and segmental membranes. In addition, the total content of phenolic compounds, flavonoids, and the antioxidant activity of ethanolic extracts produced conventionally and with -cyclodextrin was examined and compared. In addition, antioxidant activity was measured using the radical scavenging activity assay (ABTS), radical scavenging activity assay (DPPH), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) methods. The yield of naringin increased from 10.53 ± 0.52 mg/g to 45.56 ± 5.06 mg/g to 51.11 ± 7.63 mg/g of the segmental membrane when cyclodextrins (α, β-CD) were used; naringenin increased from 65.85 ± 10.96 μg/g to 91.19 ± 15.19 μg/g of the segmental membrane when cyclodextrins (α, β-CD) were used. Furthermore, the results showed that cyclodextrin-assisted extraction had a significant impact in significantly increasing the yield of flavanones from grapefruit. In addition, the process was more efficient and less expensive, resulting in higher yields of flavanones with a lower concentration of ethanol and effort. This shows that cyclodextrin-assisted extraction is an excellent method for extracting valuable compounds from grapefruit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress and Protective Effects of Natural Products in Health)
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15 pages, 2746 KiB  
Article
Fermentation of Abelmoschus manihot Extract with Halophilic Bacillus licheniformis CP6 Results in Enhanced Anti-Inflammatory Activities
by Mi Hwa Park, Yu Jeong Yeom, Dariimaa Ganbat, Min Kyeong Kim, Seong-Bo Kim, Yong-Jik Lee and Sang-Jae Lee
Nutrients 2023, 15(2), 309; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15020309 - 07 Jan 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2248
Abstract
Microbial fermentation provides a valorization strategy, through biotransformation, to convert plant-derived raw materials into health-promoting agents. In this study, we have investigated the antioxidative activity of Abelmoschus manihot fermented with various Bacillaceae strains from specific environments and demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects of Bacillus [...] Read more.
Microbial fermentation provides a valorization strategy, through biotransformation, to convert plant-derived raw materials into health-promoting agents. In this study, we have investigated the antioxidative activity of Abelmoschus manihot fermented with various Bacillaceae strains from specific environments and demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects of Bacillus licheniformis CP6 fermented A. manihot extract (FAME) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated Raw264.7 macrophages. Of 1500 bacteria isolated from various specific environments, 47 extracellular protease- and amylase-producing strains with qualified presumption safety status, belonging to the family Bacillaceae, were selected for A. manihot fermentation. Among them, strain CP6, a halophilic bacterium isolated from Tongyeong seawater in Korea and identified as B. licheniformis, showed the highest antioxidant activity. In particular, FAME exerted anti-inflammatory effects on LPS-stimulated Raw264.7 macrophages. Consequently, FAME had a potent inhibitory effect on nitric oxide (NO) production in LPS-stimulated macrophages, without cytotoxicity. Moreover, FAME downregulated LPS-induced pro-inflammatory mediator and enzyme levels in LPS-induced Raw264.7 cells, including IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, iNOS, and COX-2, compared to levels when cells were incubated in A. manihot extract (IAME). Further detailed characterization indicated that FAME suppresses inflammation by blocking NF-κB via IKK phosphorylation inhibition and IκB-α degradation and by downregulating NO production, and inflammatory mediators also decreased NF-κB translocation. Furthermore, FAME inhibited LPS-stimulated activation of MAPKs, including ERK1/2, JNK, and p38, compared to that with either IAME. Therefore, we suggest that FAME could be used for inflammation-related disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress and Protective Effects of Natural Products in Health)
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15 pages, 3729 KiB  
Article
Neuroprotective and Anti-Neuroinflammatory Properties of Vignae Radiatae Semen in Neuronal HT22 and Microglial BV2 Cell Lines
by Yun Hee Jeong, You-Chang Oh, Tae In Kim and Jin Yeul Ma
Nutrients 2022, 14(24), 5265; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14245265 - 10 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2511
Abstract
The important factors in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders include oxidative stress and neuron-glia system inflammation. Vignae Radiatae Semen (VRS) exhibits antihypertensive, anticancer, anti-melanogenesis, hepatoprotective, and immunomodulatory properties. However, the neuroprotective effects and anti-neuroinflammatory activities of VRS ethanol extract (VRSE) remained unknown. Thus, [...] Read more.
The important factors in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders include oxidative stress and neuron-glia system inflammation. Vignae Radiatae Semen (VRS) exhibits antihypertensive, anticancer, anti-melanogenesis, hepatoprotective, and immunomodulatory properties. However, the neuroprotective effects and anti-neuroinflammatory activities of VRS ethanol extract (VRSE) remained unknown. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory activities of VRSE against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced neuronal cell death in mouse hippocampal HT22 cells and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglial activation, respectively. This study revealed that VRSE pretreatment had significantly prevented H2O2-induced neuronal cell death and attenuated reactive oxygen species generations in HT22 cells. Additionally, VRSE attenuated the apoptosis protein expression while increasing the anti-apoptotic protein expression. Further, VRSE showed significant inhibitory effects on LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines in BV2 microglia. Moreover, VRSE pretreatment significantly activated the tropomyosin-related kinase receptor B/cAMP response element-binding protein, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, and heme oxygenase-1 signaling pathways in HT22 cells exposed to H2O2 and inhibited the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-κB mechanism in BV2 cells stimulated with LPS. Therefore, VRSE exerts therapeutic potential against neurodegenerative diseases related to oxidative stress and pathological inflammatory responses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress and Protective Effects of Natural Products in Health)
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Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research, Other

21 pages, 1780 KiB  
Review
Dietary Polyphenols Remodel DNA Methylation Patterns of NRF2 in Chronic Disease
by Srinivasaragavan Divyajanani, Kannan Harithpriya, Kumar Ganesan and Kunka Mohanram Ramkumar
Nutrients 2023, 15(15), 3347; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15153347 - 27 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1479
Abstract
The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a transcription factor crucial in regulating cellular homeostasis and apoptosis. The NRF2 gene has been implicated in various biological activities, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. NRF2 can be regulated genetically and epigenetically at [...] Read more.
The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a transcription factor crucial in regulating cellular homeostasis and apoptosis. The NRF2 gene has been implicated in various biological activities, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. NRF2 can be regulated genetically and epigenetically at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and translational levels. Although DNA methylation is one of the critical biological processes vital for gene expression, sometimes, anomalous methylation patterns result in the dysregulation of genes and consequent diseases and disorders. Several studies have reported promoter hypermethylation downregulated NRF2 expression and its downstream targets. In contrast to the unalterable nature of genetic patterns, epigenetic changes can be reversed, opening up new possibilities in developing therapies for various metabolic disorders and diseases. This review discusses the current state of the NRF2-mediated antioxidative and chemopreventive activities of several natural phytochemicals, including sulforaphane, resveratrol, curcumin, luteolin, corosolic acid, apigenin, and most other compounds that have been found to activate NRF2. This epigenetic reversal of hypermethylated NRF2 states provides new opportunities for research into dietary phytochemistry that affects the human epigenome and the possibility for cutting-edge approaches to target NRF2-mediated signaling to prevent chronic disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress and Protective Effects of Natural Products in Health)
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31 pages, 2150 KiB  
Review
Potential Benefits of Lycopene Consumption: Rationale for Using It as an Adjuvant Treatment for Malaria Patients and in Several Diseases
by Everton Luiz Pompeu Varela, Antônio Rafael Quadros Gomes, Aline da Silva Barbosa dos Santos, Eliete Pereira de Carvalho, Valdicley Vieira Vale and Sandro Percário
Nutrients 2022, 14(24), 5303; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14245303 - 14 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3043
Abstract
Malaria is a disease that affects thousands of people around the world every year. Its pathogenesis is associated with the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) and lower levels of micronutrients and antioxidants. Patients under drug treatment have high levels of [...] Read more.
Malaria is a disease that affects thousands of people around the world every year. Its pathogenesis is associated with the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) and lower levels of micronutrients and antioxidants. Patients under drug treatment have high levels of oxidative stress biomarkers in the body tissues, which limits the use of these drugs. Therefore, several studies have suggested that RONS inhibition may represent an adjuvant therapeutic strategy in the treatment of these patients by increasing the antioxidant capacity of the host. In this sense, supplementation with antioxidant compounds such as zinc, selenium, and vitamins A, C, and E has been suggested as part of the treatment. Among dietary antioxidants, lycopene is the most powerful antioxidant among the main carotenoids. This review aimed to describe the main mechanisms inducing oxidative stress during malaria, highlighting the production of RONS as a defense mechanism against the infection induced by the ischemia-reperfusion syndrome, the metabolism of the parasite, and the metabolism of antimalarial drugs. Furthermore, the effects of lycopene on several diseases in which oxidative stress is implicated as a cause are outlined, providing information about its mechanism of action, and providing an evidence-based justification for its supplementation in malaria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress and Protective Effects of Natural Products in Health)
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Other

22 pages, 1598 KiB  
Systematic Review
Oxidative Stress and Natural Products in Orthodontic Treatment: A Systematic Review
by Francesco Inchingolo, Angelo Michele Inchingolo, Giulia Latini, Laura Ferrante, Irma Trilli, Gaetano Del Vecchio, Giulia Palmieri, Giuseppina Malcangi, Alessio Danilo Inchingolo and Gianna Dipalma
Nutrients 2024, 16(1), 113; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16010113 - 28 Dec 2023
Viewed by 968
Abstract
In recent years, orthodontics, a specialized branch of dentistry, has evolved considerably in terms of both techniques and materials used. Aimed at correcting dental malocclusions and craniofacial anomalies, it improves the functionality and aesthetics of the face and oral cavity. However, orthodontic treatment, [...] Read more.
In recent years, orthodontics, a specialized branch of dentistry, has evolved considerably in terms of both techniques and materials used. Aimed at correcting dental malocclusions and craniofacial anomalies, it improves the functionality and aesthetics of the face and oral cavity. However, orthodontic treatment, in its developmental stages, may induce oxidative stress (O.S.) phenomena, with an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), damaging the dental and periodontal tissues involved, affecting the short-, medium- and long-term results. Studies on the antioxidant effects of natural products (e.g., resveratrol, green tea, turmeric, etc.) in the medical field have aroused considerable interest in recent years. A systematic literature review was conducted on the PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science databases using natural products (N.P.s), O.S., and orthodontic as keywords. The study aims to consider the determinants of the increase in ROS occurring during orthodontic treatment and the possibility of natural products being able to control and neutralize biochemical phenomena by restoring the physiological process in which the balance between the production of ROS and the ability of the body’s antioxidant system to neutralize them is in favor of the latter. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress and Protective Effects of Natural Products in Health)
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