nutrients-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Nutrition, Neurons and Disease

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2023) | Viewed by 5764

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Research, Innlandet Hospital, N-2381 Brumunddal, Norway
Interests: internal medicine; endocrinology; toxicology; neurodegenerative diseases; neuroimaging; bioinorganic chemistry; environmental chemistry; medicinal chemistry

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Karolinska Institutet, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden
Interests: neurology; clinical neurophysiology; neurodegenerative disorders; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; multiple sclerosis; neurotoxic metals
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Neurodegenerative diseases include diagnostic entities such as Alzheimer´s disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Collectively they affect some 60 million people worldwide. The risk of developing a neurodegenerative disease increases with age, and as life expectancy increases, more people are expected to be affected in the coming decades. Currently, neurodegenerative diseases are not curable; symptomatic treatments exist, but do not stop disease progression. However certain environmental factors affect the risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases. Among these, nutrition and its role in the pathogenesis and evolution of neurodegenerative diseases has recently sparked an increasing research interest.

Following that trend, this Special Issue of Nutrients titled "Nutrition, Neurons and Disease" aims to collect the latest research on how nutrition can modulate neurodegeneration. This Special Issue welcomes researchers from all around the world to submit their original research articles and reviews about the role of minerals and vitamins, nutritional metals and trace elements, metabolic syndrome, glucose dysregulation, amino acid metabolism, and certain dietary patterns (Mediterranean diet, LiPiDi diet, etc.) in preventing/delaying or promoting the progression of neurodegeneration.

Prof. Dr. Jan O. Aaseth
Dr. Per M. Roos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • neurodegenerative diseases
  • nutrition/diet
  • micronutrients
  • amino acid metabolism
  • glucose metabolism
  • metabolic syndrome
  • antioxidants
  • metals

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

17 pages, 1887 KiB  
Article
A Glutamate Scavenging Protocol Combined with Deanna Protocol in SOD1-G93A Mouse Model of ALS
by Christopher Q. Rogers, Melissa Ramirez, Carol S. Landon, Janine M. DeBlasi, Andrew P. Koutnik, Csilla Ari and Dominic P. D’Agostino
Nutrients 2023, 15(8), 1821; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15081821 - 10 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3111
Abstract
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive disease of neuronal degeneration in the motor cortex, brainstem, and spinal cord, resulting in impaired motor function and premature demise as a result of insufficient respiratory drive. ALS is associated with dysfunctions in neurons, neuroglia, muscle [...] Read more.
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive disease of neuronal degeneration in the motor cortex, brainstem, and spinal cord, resulting in impaired motor function and premature demise as a result of insufficient respiratory drive. ALS is associated with dysfunctions in neurons, neuroglia, muscle cells, energy metabolism, and glutamate balance. Currently, there is not a widely accepted, effective treatment for this condition. Prior work from our lab has demonstrated the efficacy of supplemental nutrition with the Deanna Protocol (DP). In the present study, we tested the effects of three different treatments in a mouse model of ALS. These treatments were the DP alone, a glutamate scavenging protocol (GSP) alone, and a combination of the two treatments. Outcome measures included body weight, food intake, behavioral assessments, neurological score, and lifespan. Compared to the control group, DP had a significantly slower decline in neurological score, strength, endurance, and coordination, with a trend toward increased lifespan despite a greater loss of weight. GSP had a significantly slower decline in neurological score, strength, endurance, and coordination, with a trend toward increased lifespan. DP+GSP had a significantly slower decline in neurological score with a trend toward increased lifespan, despite a greater loss of weight. While each of the treatment groups fared better than the control group, the combination of the DP+GSP was not better than either of the individual treatments. We conclude that the beneficial effects of the DP and the GSP in this ALS mouse model are distinct, and appear to offer no additional benefit when combined. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Neurons and Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

26 pages, 1217 KiB  
Review
Beneficial Effects of Plant Oils Supplementation on Multiple Sclerosis: A Comprehensive Review of Clinical and Experimental Studies
by Ghanya Al-Naqeb, Aliki Kalmpourtzidou, Rachele De Giuseppe and Hellas Cena
Nutrients 2023, 15(22), 4827; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15224827 - 18 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2297
Abstract
Multiple sclerosis disease (MS) is a 38.5 chronic neurological autoimmune disease that affects the nervous system, and its incidence is increasing globally. At present, there is no cure for this disease, and with its severity and disabling variety, it is important to search [...] Read more.
Multiple sclerosis disease (MS) is a 38.5 chronic neurological autoimmune disease that affects the nervous system, and its incidence is increasing globally. At present, there is no cure for this disease, and with its severity and disabling variety, it is important to search for possibilities that could help to slow its progression. It is recognized that the mechanisms of MS pathology, its development and degree of activity can be affected by dietary factors. In this review, the beneficial health effects of 10 plants oils—mainly seed oils, including pomegranate seed oil, sesame oil, acer truncatum bunge seed oil, hemp seeds oil, evening primrose seed oil, coconut oil, walnut oil, essential oil from Pterodon emarginatus seeds, flaxseed oil and olive oil—on MS are discussed. The literature data indicate that plant oils could be effective for the treatment of MS and its related symptoms primarily through reducing inflammation, promoting remyelination, immunomodulation and inhibiting oxidative stress. Plant oils may potentially reduce MS progression. Longitudinal research including a larger sample size with a longer duration is essential to confirm the findings from the selected plant oils. Moreover, new plant oils should be studied for their potential MS benefit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Neurons and Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop