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Ketogenic Diet: Impact on Weight Management

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Obesity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 May 2024) | Viewed by 902

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Unit of Endocrinology, Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Federico II University Medical School of Naples, Via Sergio Pansini 5, 80131 Naples, Italy
Interests: endocrinology; obesity; metabolism; nutrition; diet; diabetes; insulin resistance; metabolic syndrome; dyslipidemia; chrononutrition; circadian rhythms; vitamin D; PCOS
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centro Italiano per la cura e il Benessere del paziente con Obesità (C.I.B.O), Endocrinology Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University Medical School of Naples, Via Sergio Pansini 5, 80131 Naples, Italy
Interests: obesity; nutrition; diet; diabetes; metabolic syndrome; dyslipidemia; chrononutrition; circadian rhythms
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to invite you to contribute to the upcoming Special Issue of Nutrients on the subject of the ketogenic diet and its impact on weight management. This Special Issue aims to empirically contribute to the expansive and ever-growing literature about the potential value of the Ketogenic diet in weight management. This dietary approach, characterized by low-carbohydrate, moderate-protein, and high-fat consumption, triggers a metabolic state known as ketosis. During ketosis, the body predominantly utilizes fats for energy, making it an intriguing avenue for weight management. This Special Issue aims to provide selected contributions to address this topic, with a particular emphasis on how to transfer experimental interventions and findings to practical in-field applications.

Potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • Efficacy of the ketogenic diet in weight loss;
  • Appetite control and the ketogenic diet;
  • Metabolic regulation on a ketogenic diet;
  • Physiological mechanisms of fat metabolism in ketosis;
  • Long-term weight management with the ketogenic diet;
  • implementing the ketogenic diet: practical considerations;
  • adverse effects and risks of the ketogenic die;
  • Ketogenic diet and exercise.

Dr. Giovanna Muscogiuri
Dr. Ludovica Verde
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ketogenic diet
  • weight management
  • ketosis
  • low carbohydrate
  • high fat
  • appetite control
  • metabolic regulation
  • weight loss
  • fat metabolism
  • dietary approach

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

11 pages, 284 KiB  
Article
Gender Differences in Liver Steatosis and Fibrosis in Overweight and Obese Patients with Metabolic Dysfunction-Associated Steatotic Liver Disease before and after 8 Weeks of Very Low-Calorie Ketogenic Diet
by Roberta Rinaldi, Sara De Nucci, Rossella Donghia, Rosanna Donvito, Nicole Cerabino, Martina Di Chito, Alice Penza, Francesco Pio Mongelli, Endrit Shahini, Marianna Zappimbulso, Pasqua Letizia Pesole, Sergio Coletta, Vincenzo Triggiani, Raffaele Cozzolongo, Gianluigi Giannelli and Giovanni De Pergola
Nutrients 2024, 16(10), 1408; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16101408 - 8 May 2024
Viewed by 653
Abstract
Obesity and metabolic syndrome are linked to steatotic liver disease (SLD), the most common form of chronic liver disease. Lifestyle modifications and dieting are strategies that can prevent metabolic dysfunction-associated steatotic liver disease (MASLD). The very low-calorie ketogenic diet (VLCKD) is a helpful [...] Read more.
Obesity and metabolic syndrome are linked to steatotic liver disease (SLD), the most common form of chronic liver disease. Lifestyle modifications and dieting are strategies that can prevent metabolic dysfunction-associated steatotic liver disease (MASLD). The very low-calorie ketogenic diet (VLCKD) is a helpful treatment for MASLD and has been recommended for people affected by obesity; we evaluated the effect of gender on steatosis and fibrosis in a cohort of 112 overweight or obese patients undergoing an eight-week treatment with a VLCKD. Differences between the genders in terms of anthropometric measures, body composition, and metabolic indicators were examined before, during, and after the nutritional intervention. At baseline, there were significant differences between men and women in terms of anthropometric parameters, blood pressure, Homeostatic Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR), fasting insulin, hepatic markers, and lipid profile. Men had considerably higher levels of liver steatosis (measured by CAP) and liver stiffness (measured by E) under basal conditions than women. After the VLCKD, there were reductions in both genders of controlled attenuation parameter (CAP), body weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, insulin resistance, fat mass (FM), free fat mass (FFM), and fasting blood glucose, insulin, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, alanine transaminase (ALT), gamma-glutamyl transferase (γGT), and uric acid levels. Only in men, liver stiffness, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatinine, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels significantly decreased. Moreover, men had significantly greater levels of liver steatosis: the male gender featured an increase of 23.96 points of the Fibroscan CAP. Men exhibited higher levels of steatosis and fibrosis than women, and these differences persist despite VLCKD. These gender-specific variations in steatosis and fibrosis levels could be caused by hormonal and metabolic factors, suggesting that different therapeutic strategies might be required depending on the gender. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ketogenic Diet: Impact on Weight Management)
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