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Pediatric Gastrointestinal Pain and Nutrition

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Pediatric Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021) | Viewed by 16759

Special Issue Editors

1. Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences Luigi Sacco, Università di Milano, 20122 Milan, Italy
2. Department of Pediatrics, Vittore Buzzi Children’s Hospital, 20154 Milan, Italy
Interests: pediatrics; nutrition; probiotic; prebiotics; gut microbiota
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
1. Department of Health Sciences, Università di Milano, 20122 Milan, Italy
2. Department of Pediatrics, Vittore Buzzi Children’s Hospital, 20154 Milan, Italy
Interests: enteral and parenteral nutrition; neurologically impaired children; childhood obesity; metabolic syndrome; gut microbiota
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Abdominal pain is a frequently observed symptom in infants and children and may be present in different disorders and conditions.

Dietary pattern may act through different pathways in both pathogenesis and treatment of different gastrointestinal conditions. In the inflammatory bowel syndromes, certain foods or specific nutrients may be involved in the inflammatory process, whereas some others may have a protective role. Diet is the mainstay of the treatment of food allergies, celiac disease, and gluten sensitivity. In functional abdominal pain, most of patients, including children and adolescents, tend to modify their dietary patterns considering that symptoms exacerbate with eating, and specifically with the intake of some specific foods.

Gut dysbiosis, associated with westernized diet, had been demonstrated to have a role in a number of gastrointestinal conditions and interventions through the diet, probiotic, prebiotic, postbiotic or symbiotic supplementation are being extensively studied.

Moreover, in conditions characterized by abdominal pain, there is frequently the need to study the nutritional status of patients and to establish a nutritional follow-up, not only for achieving resolution of signs and symptoms but also for avoiding nutritional imbalances. Nutrition has a long-lasting impact on the health of children with gastrointestinal disorders.

In this Special Issue of Nutrients, we would like to bring together manuscripts dealing with the topic of “Pediatric gastrointestinal pain and nutrition”. Topics may vary and include dietary interventions with foods or specific dietary patterns, food supplements or intervention on the gut microbiome, but also nutritional status evaluation and follow-up of pediatric patients with gastrointestinal disorders. Different types of manuscripts, including original clinical research articles and up-to-date reviews are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Valentina Fabiano
Prof. Dr. Elvira Verduci
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gastrointestinal pain
  • nutrition
  • nutritional status
  • inflammatory bowel diseases
  • irritable bowel syndrome
  • celiac diasease
  • food allergies
  • microbiome
  • dietary pattern
  • probiotics
  • prebiotics
  • postbiotics
  • synbiotics
  • intestinal microbiota influencing formula

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Review

26 pages, 869 KiB  
Review
Term Infant Formulas Influencing Gut Microbiota: An Overview
Nutrients 2021, 13(12), 4200; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13124200 - 23 Nov 2021
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 4929
Abstract
Intestinal colonization of the neonate is highly dependent on the term of pregnancy, the mode of delivery, the type of feeding [breast feeding or formula feeding]. Postnatal immune maturation is dependent on the intestinal microbiome implementation and composition and type of feeding is [...] Read more.
Intestinal colonization of the neonate is highly dependent on the term of pregnancy, the mode of delivery, the type of feeding [breast feeding or formula feeding]. Postnatal immune maturation is dependent on the intestinal microbiome implementation and composition and type of feeding is a key issue in the human gut development, the diversity of microbiome, and the intestinal function. It is well established that exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months or more has several benefits with respect to formula feeding. The composition of the new generation of infant formulas aims in mimicking HM by reproducing its beneficial effects on intestinal microbiome and on the gut associated immune system (GAIS). Several approaches have been developed currently for designing new infant formulas by the addition of bioactive ingredients such as human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs), probiotics, prebiotics [fructo-oligosaccharides (FOSs) and galacto-oligosaccharides (GOSs)], or by obtaining the so-called post-biotics also known as milk fermentation products. The aim of this article is to guide the practitioner in the understanding of these different types of Microbiota Influencing Formulas by listing and summarizing the main concepts and characteristics of these different models of enriched IFs with bioactive ingredients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Gastrointestinal Pain and Nutrition)
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22 pages, 1564 KiB  
Review
Dietary Fat Effect on the Gut Microbiome, and Its Role in the Modulation of Gastrointestinal Disorders in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Nutrients 2021, 13(11), 3818; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13113818 - 27 Oct 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3764
Abstract
Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) report a higher frequency and severity of gastrointestinal disorders (GID) than typically developing (TD) children. GID-associated discomfort increases feelings of anxiety and frustration, contributing to the severity of ASD. Emerging evidence supports the biological intersection of neurodevelopment [...] Read more.
Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) report a higher frequency and severity of gastrointestinal disorders (GID) than typically developing (TD) children. GID-associated discomfort increases feelings of anxiety and frustration, contributing to the severity of ASD. Emerging evidence supports the biological intersection of neurodevelopment and microbiome, indicating the integral contribution of GM in the development and function of the nervous system, and mental health, and disease balance. Dysbiotic GM could be a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of GID in children with ASD. High-fat diets may modulate GM through accelerated growth of bile-tolerant bacteria, altered bacterial ratios, and reduced bacterial diversity, which may increase the risk of GID. Notably, saturated fatty acids are considered to have a pronounced effect on the increase of bile-tolerant bacteria and reduction in microbial diversity. Additionally, omega-3 exerts a favorable impact on GM and gut health due to its anti-inflammatory properties. Despite inconsistencies in the data elaborated in the review, the dietary fat composition, as part of an overall dietary intervention, plays a role in modulating GID, specifically in ASD, due to the altered microbiome profile. This review emphasizes the need to conduct future experimental studies investigating the effect of diets with varying fatty acid compositions on GID-specific microbiome profiles in children with ASD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Gastrointestinal Pain and Nutrition)
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22 pages, 1278 KiB  
Review
Nutritional, Gastrointestinal and Endo-Metabolic Challenges in the Management of Children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy Type 1
Nutrients 2021, 13(7), 2400; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13072400 - 13 Jul 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 7200
Abstract
The management of patients with spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA1) is constantly evolving. In just a few decades, the medical approach has switched from an exclusively palliative therapy to a targeted therapy, transforming the natural history of the disease, improving survival time [...] Read more.
The management of patients with spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA1) is constantly evolving. In just a few decades, the medical approach has switched from an exclusively palliative therapy to a targeted therapy, transforming the natural history of the disease, improving survival time and quality of life and creating new challenges and goals. Many nutritional problems, gastrointestinal disorders and metabolic and endocrine alterations are commonly identified in patients affected by SMA1 during childhood and adolescence. For this reason, a proper pediatric multidisciplinary approach is then required in the clinical care of these patients, with a specific focus on the prevention of most common complications. The purpose of this narrative review is to provide the clinician with a practical and usable tool about SMA1 patients care, through a comprehensive insight into the nutritional, gastroenterological, metabolic and endocrine management of SMA1. Considering the possible horizons opened thanks to new therapeutic frontiers, a nutritional and endo-metabolic surveillance is a crucial element to be considered for a proper clinical care of these patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pediatric Gastrointestinal Pain and Nutrition)
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