The Beneficial Effects of Active Dietary Ingredients in Plants on Chronic Diseases

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 August 2024 | Viewed by 2921

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Public Health, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330006, China
Interests: phytochemicals; natural products; chronic disease; functional foods; anti-tumor; immune regulation; apoptosis

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Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047, China
Interests: bioactive compounds; chronic disease; metabolism

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Co-Guest Editor
Department of Nutrition Science and Food Hygiene, Xiangya School of Public Health, Central South University, Changsha 410078, China
Interests: nutrition and dietetics; phytochemicals;phytoestrogens; chronic diseases;metabolic disorders; lipid metabolism

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Chronic diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases, have become epidemic public health issues due to the increasing morbidity and mortality rates. Nutrition intervention is an indispensable part of the comprehensive prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. The majority of plants, used as medicinal or edible substances, have been applied to prevent and treat chronic diseases for several years, which indicates that their active ingredients are profound alternatives for nutritional intervention. However, little knowledge of the potential interactions between the major active ingredients in the plants and host health has become an obstacles for their application in chronic diseases prevention and treatments. Therefore, this Special Issue focuses on the beneficial effects of natural extracts or active ingredients in plants in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases, and the underlying mechanisms.

Original research articles, clinical studies, and reviews are warmly welcome.

Dr. Fang Chen
Prof. Dr. Ting Luo
Dr. Wenya Zheng
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • phytochemicals
  • natural products
  • chronic disease
  • functional foods
  • nutrition
  • phytomedicine
  • metabolic disorders
  • mechanism

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 16972 KiB  
Article
Protective Effect of Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. (Jackfruit) Polysaccharides on Liver Injury Induced by Cyclophosphamide in Mice
by Ming Cheng, Yifan Zheng, Gang Wu, Lehe Tan, Fei Xu, Yanjun Zhang, Xiaoai Chen and Kexue Zhu
Nutrients 2024, 16(1), 166; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16010166 - 4 Jan 2024
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Abstract
In recent years, Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. (jackfruit) polysaccharides (namely JFP-Ps) have attracted much attention due to their multiple biological activities. This study aimed to explore the protective effects and the underlying mechanisms of JFP-Ps on cyclophosphamide (Cp)-induced liver damage. The protective effect of [...] Read more.
In recent years, Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. (jackfruit) polysaccharides (namely JFP-Ps) have attracted much attention due to their multiple biological activities. This study aimed to explore the protective effects and the underlying mechanisms of JFP-Ps on cyclophosphamide (Cp)-induced liver damage. The protective effect of JFP-Ps was evaluated using HE staining, antioxidant testing, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), Western blot and ultra-performance liquid chromatography equipped with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS/MS) metabolomics analysis. The results showed that Cp caused pathological liver damage, activated oxidative stress and downregulated cytokine expression, while JFP-Ps treatment was found to exert antioxidant effects and play immune regulatory roles through mitogen-activated protein kinase/nuclear factor-κB (MAPK/NF-κB) related inflammation and cell apoptosis pathways to protect the Cp-induced liver injury. Metabolomic results showed that the liver-protective effects of JFP-Ps were mainly related to aminoacyl transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) biosynthesis, sphingolipid metabolism, purine metabolism and the citrate cycle. These results indicate that JFP-Ps have great potential application in alleviating liver injury. Full article
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17 pages, 2012 KiB  
Article
Virgin Camellia Seed Oil Improves Glycolipid Metabolism in the Kidney of High Fat-Fed Rats through AMPK-SREBP Pathway
by Qinhe Zhu, Guihui Li, Li Ma, Bolin Chen, Dawei Zhang, Jing Gao, Senwen Deng and Yongzhong Chen
Nutrients 2023, 15(23), 4888; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15234888 - 23 Nov 2023
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Abstract
Camellia seed oil (CO) is used as edible oil in southern China because of its excellent fatty acid composition and abundant bioactive compounds. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the most common chronic degenerative diseases in China, and active compounds in vegetable [...] Read more.
Camellia seed oil (CO) is used as edible oil in southern China because of its excellent fatty acid composition and abundant bioactive compounds. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the most common chronic degenerative diseases in China, and active compounds in vegetable oil, like virgin olive oil, have been demonstrated to be efficacious in the management of CKD. In this study, virgin CO was refined using a standard process. The refining had minimal impact on the fatty acid composition, but significantly reduced the presence of bioactive compounds like polyphenols in CO. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats fed with high fat diet (Group G) were treated with either virgin (Group Z) or refined CO (Group R). The oral administration of CO alleviated lipid accumulation and decreased body and kidney weight gain. Furthermore, treatment with virgin CO increased the renal ATP content. The renal expression levels of AMPK and key enzymes involved in fatty acid oxidation (CPT-1 and ACOX1) and glycolysis (HK, PFK, PK and GAPDH) were up-regulated in Group Z, thereby enhancing the ATP production. Virgin CO treatment downregulated the expression level of SREBP2 and its downstream target genes, such as ACC, FAS, and HMGCR, which reduced lipid synthesis. These findings indicate that virgin CO improves glycolipid metabolism and restores energy homeostasis in the kidneys of rats fed with a high-fat diet by modulating the AMPK–SREBP-signaling pathway, suggesting the potential of active compounds in virgin CO for managing the renal failure associated with glycolipid dysmetabolism. Full article
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