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Nutrition Intervention on Supportive Cares for Cancer Patients

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (5 January 2024) | Viewed by 5571

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Kanagawa Cancer Center Research Institute, Yokohama, Japan
Interests: cancer treatment; supportive care; palliative care; cancer prevention; quality of life
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue to clarify the role of diet and nutrition in advanced cancer prevention, treatment, and survivorship.

Cancer is a worldwide public health concern. The accelerating aging of the population and increasingly unbalanced diet increase the risk of cancer to some extent. At the same time, more and more young people are developing cancer due to unhealthy diet and lifestyles. Malnutrition or overnutrition negatively impacts the efficacy of cancer treatment. As a result of improved outcomes for cancer patients, increased focus has been placed on how to manage cancer survivors, including the roles of diet and nutrition.

In this Special Issue, we invite researchers to submit papers on nutritional strategies for advanced cancer management. We welcome original research articles and animal and clinical studies, as well as review articles.

Dr. Hiroto Narimatsu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • treatment
  • chemotherapy
  • cancer prevention
  • diet therapy
  • cancer survivors
  • advanced cancer
  • health management

Published Papers (2 papers)

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11 pages, 1040 KiB  
Article
Nutritional Status and the Outcomes of Endoscopic Stenting in Benign and Malignant Diseases of Esophagus
by Wojciech Dudzic, Cezary Płatkowski, Marcin Folwarski, Jarosław Meyer-Szary, Karolina Kaźmierczak-Siedlecka, Marcin Ekman, Tomasz Wojciechowicz and Marek Dobosz
Nutrients 2023, 15(6), 1524; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15061524 - 21 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1774
Abstract
Background. Endoscopic stenting (ES) is a widely known method for palliative dysphagia treatment in esophageal strictures. Esophageal cancer is often associated with advanced malnutrition, which may increase the risk of complications of the procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate complication [...] Read more.
Background. Endoscopic stenting (ES) is a widely known method for palliative dysphagia treatment in esophageal strictures. Esophageal cancer is often associated with advanced malnutrition, which may increase the risk of complications of the procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate complication rates and the impact of nutritional status on the outcomes of ES. Patients and Methods. A single-center retrospective study was conducted at Copernicus Hospital in Gdańsk, Poland. Adult patients who underwent endoscopic stenting between February 2014 and December 2018 were included. The influence of patient characteristics (age, sex, indications for esophageal stenting, and location of stenosis) and nutritional status (BMI, NRS 2002, GLIM, and dysphagia score) on complication rates and survival were analyzed. Results. Eighty-one patients (69% men) were enrolled in the study. In 69%, the indication for ES was malignancy (mainly esophageal cancer). The median dysphagia score significantly decreased from 2.8 to 0.6 after the procedure (p < 0.001). Complications were observed in 27% (n = 22) of the patients. Early complications were bleeding (2.5%), stent unexpansion (2.5%), and stent migration during the procedure (3.7%). There were no early fatal complications of the procedure. Late complications included: stent migration (6.2%), tissue overgrowth (6.2%), food impaction (2.2%), fistula formation (3.7%), bleeding (3.7%), and stent malposition (1.2%). A total of 76% of the participants scored ≥ 3 points in nutritional screening (NRS2002) and 70% were diagnosed with severe malnutrition (GLIM -stage 2). A stent diameter of < 2.2 cm compared with ≥ 2.2 was associated with a higher rate of migrations (15.5% vs. 2.5%). The median survival time in the malignant group was 90 days. Histopathological diagnosis and patients’ nutritional status (BMI, NRS 2002, GLIM, and dysphagia score) had no significant effect on complication rates and survival after esophageal stent insertion. Conclusions. Endoscopic stenting is a relatively safe procedure for the palliative treatment of esophageal strictures. Severe malnutrition, although common, does not affect the outcomes of the procedure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Intervention on Supportive Cares for Cancer Patients)
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18 pages, 7084 KiB  
Systematic Review
Association of Fried Food Intake with Gastric Cancer Risk: A Systemic Review and Meta-Analysis of Case–Control Studies
by Ting Zhang, Sang Shin Song, Meiling Liu and Sunmin Park
Nutrients 2023, 15(13), 2982; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15132982 - 30 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3408
Abstract
Gastric cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in Asia, and has a significant global incidence. However, the impact of fried food consumption on gastric cancer risk remains uncertain, mainly due to the limited number of participants in previous studies. To address [...] Read more.
Gastric cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in Asia, and has a significant global incidence. However, the impact of fried food consumption on gastric cancer risk remains uncertain, mainly due to the limited number of participants in previous studies. To address this knowledge gap, we aimed to examine the association between fried food intake and gastric cancer incidence through a comprehensive meta-analysis. We conducted a thorough search across multiple databases, including PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Korean Information Service System (KISS), and Research Information Service System (RISS), to collect studies. The newly analyzed results of the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study (KoGES) findings were added. We assessed integrated odds ratios (ORs) and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) from the selected studies using Cochrane RevMan 5.0 for the meta-analysis. The quality of the studies included in the meta-analysis was assessed using the Study Quality Assessment Tool of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). We included 18 studies in the analysis, which compared the impact of fried food intake in gastric cancer patients (n = 5739) and healthy adults (control, n = 70,933). There was a significant positive association between gastric cancer risk and fried food intake (OR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.23–1.87, I2 = 76%, p = 0.0001). The relationship was found to be significant in both non-East Asians (OR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.18–1.85, I2 = 31%, p = 0.0006) and East Asians (OR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.14–2.08, I2 = 83%, p = 0.005). In conclusion, this meta-analysis supports the notion that fried food intake is associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer in both non-Asians and Asians. Promoting a reduction in fried food consumption as a measure against gastric cancer risk is recommended. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Intervention on Supportive Cares for Cancer Patients)
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