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Nutrition, Weight, and Health Outcomes in Adolescents and Young Adults

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Obesity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2023) | Viewed by 4995

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Child and Family Studies, College of Behavioral and Community Sciences, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33612, USA
Interests: overweight; childhood cancer survivors; adolescent; obesity; pediatric health outcomes

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Guest Editor
Department of Health Outcomes and Behavior, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL 33612, USA
Interests: nutrition; dietary intake; physical activity; nutritional status; cancer survivorship; cancer patients; young adults

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent decades, the prevalence of adolescent and young adult obesity has dramatically increased worldwide and, in many countries, has resulted in a major public health issue. Obesity is a complex disorder determined by both genetic and environmental factors, but also by their interaction. Obesity in adolescents and young adults is the phenotypic expression of the interaction between polygenic inheritance with food intake and physical activity habits. Studies focused on increasing our understanding of diet and overweight/obesity have been published. However, the role of diet in the etiology of overweight/obesity remains controversial. You are invited to submit proposals for manuscripts that fit the objectives and the topics of this Special Issue.

This Special Issue, “Nutrition, Weight, and Health Outcomes in Adolescents and Young Adults”, aims to publish selected papers detailing worldwide trends in weight status and specific aspects of diet and nutrition. Particularly, papers (reviews and/or clinical or experimental studies) dealing with trends of overweight and obesity among adolescents and young adults (AYA) across different continents, and especially those studying the potential relationships between these trends and relations with eating behaviors and health outcomes, will be included.

Prof. Dr. Marilyn Stern
Dr. Sylvia Crower
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • overweight
  • obesity
  • BMI
  • weight status
  • adiposity
  • adolescent
  • young adult
  • health
  • nutrition
  • dietary intake
  • physical activity

Published Papers (3 papers)

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14 pages, 1218 KiB  
Article
Opposing Effects of Nutritional Supply on Bone Health at Different Ages: Based on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Database
by Jieqiong Wei, Yaxi Zhang, Yuehan Yuan, Min Li, Bingfang Zhai and Jihua Chen
Nutrients 2024, 16(6), 758; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16060758 - 07 Mar 2024
Viewed by 668
Abstract
(1) Background: Nutrients play an essential role in bone health, whether in achieving peak bone mineral density (BMD) or maintaining bone health. This study explores the relationship between nutrient supply and femoral bone health at different ages. (2) Methods: A total of 5603 [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Nutrients play an essential role in bone health, whether in achieving peak bone mineral density (BMD) or maintaining bone health. This study explores the relationship between nutrient supply and femoral bone health at different ages. (2) Methods: A total of 5603 participants meeting the inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in this study using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) database from 2005 to 2010, 2013 to 2014, and 2017 to 2018. Femoral bone mineral density and bone status were dependent variables, and dietary nutrient intake and nutrient intake status were independent variables. The relationship between dietary nutrient intake and bone mineral density was explored, and the importance of nutrients affecting bone status was analyzed through a neural network model. At the same time, we investigated the relationship between nutrient intake and bone status. (3) Results: The peak of age and femoral bone mineral density appeared at 20 years old in our study. After grouping by age, logistic regression analysis showed that before 20 years old, without adjusting other variables, high-fat diet was more likely to have normal bone mass than appropriate fat diet (OR: 4.173, 95%CI: 1.007–17.289). After adjusting for all demographic factors, niacin intake (OR: 1.062, 95%CI: 1.019–1.108) was beneficial for normal bone mass, while vitamin B6 intake (OR: 0.627, 95%CI: 0.408–0.965) was not. After 20 years old, after adjusting for carbohydrate, protein, vitamin B6, niacin, dietary fat, vitamin B2, and vitamin B12, vitamin B2 intake (OR: 1.153, 95%CI: 1.04–1.278) was beneficial for normal bone mass, while vitamin B6 intake (OR: 0.842, 95%CI: 0.726–0.976) was not. After adjusting for all confounding factors, vitamin B2 intake (OR: 1.288, 95%CI: 1.102–1.506) was beneficial for normal bone mass. In addition, we found that even if there was no statistical significance, the effects of high-fat diet on bone mass were different at different ages. (4) Conclusions: By conducting an in-depth analysis of the NHANES database, this study reveals that dietary factors exert divergent effects on bone health across different age groups, implying the necessity of implementing tailored dietary strategies to maintain optimal bone health at distinct life stages. Full article
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16 pages, 326 KiB  
Article
Multi-Level Determinants of Food Insecurity among Racially and Ethnically Diverse College Students
by Nashira I. Brown, Acadia W. Buro, Rashida Jones, David Himmelgreen, Amber D. Dumford, Kyaien Conner, Marilyn Stern and Rita DeBate
Nutrients 2023, 15(18), 4065; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15184065 - 20 Sep 2023
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Abstract
Compared with the general population, the prevalence of food insecurity (FI) is higher among college students. The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated FI disparities and highlighted the need for further research to better understand and address FI in this population. Although race and ethnicity are [...] Read more.
Compared with the general population, the prevalence of food insecurity (FI) is higher among college students. The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated FI disparities and highlighted the need for further research to better understand and address FI in this population. Although race and ethnicity are two of the strongest predictors of FI among college students, little research is available on the determinants of FI among racial/ethnic minority college students. A cross-sectional study (n = 588) based on the National Institute of Minority Health and Health Disparities research framework was examined to identify population-specific determinants of FI among racially/ethnically diverse college students through the assessment of multiple domains (behavioral, environmental, socio-cultural) and levels of influence (individual, interpersonal, and community levels). Discrimination was the sole predictor of FI for non-Hispanic Black students. Coping mechanisms for FI (savings, reduced intake) and body mass index (BMI) were predictors of FI for Hispanic and non-Hispanic White students. Additionally, decreased holistic support from faculty and staff was also observed as a predictor of FI in Hispanic students. Implications include the need for further research and the development of multi-level, tailored interventions to address FI among college students with the goal of decreasing disparities. Full article

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10 pages, 271 KiB  
Brief Report
Beef Intake Is Associated with Higher Nutrient Intake and Nutrient Adequacy in U.S. Adolescents, NHANES 2001–2018
by Kristin Fulgoni and Victor L. Fulgoni III
Nutrients 2023, 15(23), 4996; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15234996 - 02 Dec 2023
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Abstract
Nutrient adequacy among adolescents is of concern due to higher nutrient requirements for their developing bodies as well as the gap between the current nutrient intake and the recommendations. The objective of this study was to determine beef intake and assess the relationship [...] Read more.
Nutrient adequacy among adolescents is of concern due to higher nutrient requirements for their developing bodies as well as the gap between the current nutrient intake and the recommendations. The objective of this study was to determine beef intake and assess the relationship between beef consumption and nutrient intake and nutrient adequacy in male and female adolescents, 14–18 years of age. Dietary recalls collected during the What We Eat in America (WWEIA) portion of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cycles 2001–2018 were utilized to determine beef intake. Usual nutrient intakes were determined with the National Cancer Institute method in conjunction with day 1 and day 2 total nutrient files. Nutrient adequacy was assessed by calculating the percentage of the population below the estimated average requirement (EAR) or above the adequate intake (AI). The average beef intake of male and female adolescent beef consumers was 57.9 ± 2.4 and 46.8 ± 2.2 g with a 90th percentile of 82.3 ± 4.3 and 67.8 ± 3.5 g, respectively. Compared to non-consumers, beef consumers had a 10% or higher intake of calcium, iron, phosphorus, potassium, total choline, vitamin B12, and zinc. Over 50% of the adolescent population (regardless of beef consumption) had intakes below the EAR for calcium, magnesium, and vitamins A, C, D, and E. The percentage of the beef-consuming population below the EAR was lower for calcium, copper, folate, iron, phosphorus, zinc, and vitamins B12 and B6 as compared to non-consumers. Additionally, the portion of the population above the AI for sodium was higher in female beef consumers as compared to non-consumers. We estimate approximately 900,000 to 1,400,000, 400,000–700,000, 200,000–600,000, and 200,000–400,000 fewer adolescents to be below the EAR for zinc, phosphorus, vitamin B12, and iron, respectively if beef non-consumers were to consume beef. This study suggests beef can help increase the nutrient intake and nutrient adequacy in the diets of adolescents, helping to close important gaps for this nutritionally vulnerable population. While recommendations to reduce beef intake are widely prevalent, this could result in unintended nutritional consequences regarding under-consumed nutrients including those of public health concern important for adolescent health. Full article
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