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Pediatric Parenteral Nutrition – Current Insights and Future Direction

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2023) | Viewed by 4439

Special Issue Editors

1. Department of Health Sciences, Università di Milano, 20122 Milan, Italy
2. Department of Pediatrics, Vittore Buzzi Children’s Hospital, 20154 Milan, Italy
Interests: enteral and parenteral nutrition; neurologically impaired children; childhood obesity; metabolic syndrome; gut microbiota
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, UK
Interests: long term parenteral nutrition; nutrition in gastrointestinal disorders; cystic fibrosis
Department of Pediatrics, Vittore Buzzi Children’s Hospital, 20154 Milan, Italy
Interests: enteral and parenteral nutrition

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a critical and life-saving intervention in case of gastrointestinal (GI) failure and an inability to meet the nutritional requirements through oral or enteral feeding for prolonged times. Its application at pediatric age is transversal and ranges from premature neonates to adolescents. The need for defining specific requirements for different age groups has been progressively met by the tremendous advances in knowledge and research reached in recent decades and, nowadays, several guidelines and consensus opinions are available for health care providers working with patients receiving PN.

Notoriously, though, the actual knowledge in pediatric PN is far from exhaustively covering the multiple aspects related to it, and different issues still need to be addressed.

This Special Issue’s main goals are to highlight the most recent findings in the field of pediatric PN and to help define future reasearch priorities. Original research articles, reviews and significant case reports that meet these goals and objectives are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Elvira Verduci
Dr. Jutta Köglmeier
Dr. Alessandra Mari
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • parenteral nutrition
  • artificial feeding
  • children
  • infants
  • adolescents
  • home parenteral nutrition
  • gastrointestinal failure
  • nutritional support
  • catheter-related complications
  • acute illness
  • gastrointestinal dysmotility
  • metabolic complications
  • infectious complications
  • micronutrients
  • ethics

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

23 pages, 1213 KiB  
Review
An Overview of Short-Bowel Syndrome in Pediatric Patients: Focus on Clinical Management and Prevention of Complications
Nutrients 2023, 15(10), 2341; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15102341 - 17 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 4130
Abstract
Short-bowel syndrome (SBS) in pediatric age is defined as a malabsorptive state, resulting from congenital malformations, significant small intestine surgical resection or disease-associated loss of absorption. SBS is the leading cause of intestinal failure in children and the underlying cause in 50% of [...] Read more.
Short-bowel syndrome (SBS) in pediatric age is defined as a malabsorptive state, resulting from congenital malformations, significant small intestine surgical resection or disease-associated loss of absorption. SBS is the leading cause of intestinal failure in children and the underlying cause in 50% of patients on home parental nutrition. It is a life-altering and life-threatening disease due to the inability of the residual intestinal function to maintain nutritional homeostasis of protein, fluid, electrolyte or micronutrient without parenteral or enteral supplementation. The use of parenteral nutrition (PN) has improved medical care in SBS, decreasing mortality and improving the overall prognosis. However, the long-term use of PN is associated with the incidence of many complications, including liver disease and catheter-associated malfunction and bloodstream infections (CRBSIs). This manuscript is a narrative review of the current available evidence on the management of SBS in the pediatric population, focusing on prognostic factors and outcome. The literature review showed that in recent years, the standardization of management has demonstrated to improve the quality of life in these complex patients. Moreover, the development of knowledge in clinical practice has led to a reduction in mortality and morbidity. Diagnostic and therapeutic decisions should be made by a multidisciplinary team that includes neonatologists, pediatric surgeons, gastroenterologists, pediatricians, nutritionists and nurses. A significant improvement in prognosis can occur through the careful monitoring of nutritional status, avoiding dependence on PN and favoring an early introduction of enteral nutrition, and through the prevention, diagnosis and aggressive treatment of CRSBIs and SIBO. Multicenter initiatives, such as research consortium or data registries, are mandatory in order to personalize the management of these patients, improve their quality of life and reduce the cost of care. Full article
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