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Nutritional Care and Rehabilitation for Frailty, Sarcopenia and Malnutrition

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (21 November 2023) | Viewed by 3809

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Mie 514-8507, Japan
Interests: rehabilitation medicine; dysphagia; clinical nutrition; aspiration pneumonia; health service research
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Nutritional Management, Keiju Hatogaoka Integrated Facility for Medical and Long-Term Care, Ishikawa, Japan
Interests: dietetics; clinical nutrition; rehabilitation nutrition; dietetic practice; stroke
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the increase in the global population of older adults, the prevalence of frailty, sarcopenia, and malnutrition is increasing. Frailty, sarcopenia, and malnutrition are all associated with impairment, disability, and handicap. Frailty, sarcopenia, and malnutrition often coexist simultaneously, and their synergistic effects could worsen clinical outcomes, thus requiring a comprehensive approach.

In older adults with frailty, sarcopenia, and malnutrition, management including nutritional care and rehabilitation is essential. Both nutritional care and rehabilitation could improve physical function, activities of daily living, and quality of life in these older adults. Additional research is necessary on more effective methods for the assessment of frailty, sarcopenia, and malnutrition, and management methods, including appropriate nutritional support and rehabilitation.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to provide an updated view of the knowledge on the assessment, management, and rehabilitation for frailty, sarcopenia, and malnutrition. We welcome submissions of clinical studies, epidemiological studies, and current reviews (scoping reviews, systematic reviews, and well-written narrative reviews).

Prof. Dr. Ryo Momosaki
Dr. Yoji Kokura
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • rehabilitation
  • frailty
  • sarcopenia
  • malnutrition
  • older
  • disability
  • dysphagia

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 208 KiB  
Editorial
Nutritional Care and Rehabilitation for Frailty, Sarcopenia, and Malnutrition
by Momoko Tohyama, Yuka Shirai, Yoji Kokura and Ryo Momosaki
Nutrients 2023, 15(23), 4908; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15234908 - 24 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1092
Abstract
Frailty, sarcopenia, and malnutrition are highly prevalent among the older population [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial

12 pages, 858 KiB  
Article
Predictive Value of the Hemoglobin-Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index in Patients with Heart Failure
by Momoko Tohyama, Yuka Shirai, Miho Shimizu, Yuki Kato, Yoji Kokura and Ryo Momosaki
Nutrients 2023, 15(22), 4789; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15224789 - 15 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1344
Abstract
Malnutrition prevails among patients with heart failure (HF), increasing the likelihood of functional decline. We assessed the predictive value of the Hemoglobin-Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (H-GNRI)—combining hemoglobin and the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI)—on prognosis in older patients with HF. We used the [...] Read more.
Malnutrition prevails among patients with heart failure (HF), increasing the likelihood of functional decline. We assessed the predictive value of the Hemoglobin-Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (H-GNRI)—combining hemoglobin and the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI)—on prognosis in older patients with HF. We used the JMDC multicenter database to examine the potential associations between malnutrition risk and other outcome measures. The patients were categorized as low- (H-GNRI score = 0), intermediate- (H-GNRI score = 1), or high-risk (H-GNRI score = 2) based on their H-GNRI scores. The primary outcome measure was the Barthel Index (BI) gain; the secondary outcomes included the BI at discharge, the BI efficiency, length of hospital stay, in-hospital mortality, discharge to home or a nursing home, and hospitalization-associated disability. We analyzed 3532 patients, with 244 being low-risk, 952 being intermediate-risk, and 2336 being high-risk patients. The high-risk group of patients had significantly lower BI values at discharge, lower BI gains, reduced BI efficiency values, and prolonged hospital stays compared to those in the low-risk group. The high-risk patients also had higher in-hospital mortality rates, lower rates of discharge to home or a nursing home, and greater incidences of a hospitalization-associated disability in comparison to the low-risk group. The H-GNRI may serve as a valuable tool for determining prognoses for patients with HF. Full article
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11 pages, 1441 KiB  
Article
Body Composition Analysis in Patients with Metabolic Dysfunction-Associated Fatty Liver Disease
by Saori Onishi, Akira Fukuda, Masahiro Matsui, Kosuke Ushiro, Tomohiro Nishikawa, Akira Asai, Soo Ki Kim and Hiroki Nishikawa
Nutrients 2023, 15(18), 3878; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15183878 - 6 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 999
Abstract
We sought to examine body composition using bioimpedance analysis in patients with metabolic dysfunction-associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD, 2014 males and 949 females). Factors linked to the fat-free mass index (FF index) were examined using univariate and multivariate analysis. An FF index < [...] Read more.
We sought to examine body composition using bioimpedance analysis in patients with metabolic dysfunction-associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD, 2014 males and 949 females). Factors linked to the fat-free mass index (FF index) were examined using univariate and multivariate analysis. An FF index < 18 kg/m2 in males and an FF index < 15 kg/m2 in females were defined as having decreased skeletal muscle mass. The median age and body mass index (BMI) were 55 years and 25.4 kg/m2 in males, and 57 years and 25.4 kg/m2 in females, respectively. The FF index strongly correlated with muscle mass index both in males (r = 0.999) and females (r = 0.999). The prevalence of patients with an FF index < 18 kg/m2 in males and an FF index < 15 kg/m2 in females was well stratified according to age, BMI, severity of FL, and FIB4 index. In the males, in the multivariate analysis, BMI (p < 0.0001), fat mass index (p < 0.0001), and waist circumference (p = 0.0050) were found to be significant factors linked to FF index. In the females, in the multivariate analysis, BMI (p < 0.0001) and fat mass index (p < 0.0001) were found to be significant. In conclusion, fat accumulation as reflected by BMI, which is an easily available marker, could be a useful indicator for the skeletal muscle mass in MAFLD. Full article
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