Dietary Supplement and Inflammation-Related Diseases

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 July 2024 | Viewed by 10663

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China
Interests: phytochemicals; phytosterol; phenylethanoid glycosides; polyphenols; natural products; antioxidants; metabolism; function foods; toxicology; risk assessment; stability
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
College of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China
Interests: berries; food nutrition; diabetes; probiotics; natural products
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
College of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China
Interests: nutrients for the special people; nutritional assessment model; toxicity; disease risk reduction foods; mitochondria; kidney health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

According to the statistics of the World Health Organization (WHO), in the past 20 years, 7 of the top 10 causes of death in the world were inflammation-related diseases, accounting for 80% of deaths. Most inflammation-related diseases (neurodegenerative diseases, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, etc.) in modern society are closely related to diet. With the increasing number of people with inflammation-related diseases, people have gradually realized the importance of dietary supplements. Dietary supplements are defined as products (other than tobacco) intended to supplement the diet to benefit health, which contain at least one of the following ingredients: vitamins, minerals, herbs or botanicals (including extracts of herbs or botanicals), amino acids, metabolites, or any combination thereof. Consequently, exploring the potential relationships between dietary supplements and inflammation-related diseases is becoming essential and provides further strong evidence for dietary supplements in improving human health.

This present Special Issue aims to bring together the results of fundamental and applied research into dietary supplement, and also contribute to filling the gap in our knowledge on the protective effects and the underlying mechanisms of dietary supplement against inflammation-related diseases. Original research articles, reviews, short communications, etc., are welcome to this issue.

The following is a non-exhaustive list of potential research topics:

1. Role of dietary supplements (vitamins, minerals, herbs, etc.) in inflammation-related diseases such as cardiovascular, obesity, diabetes, etc.

2. Impact of short/long-term dietary supplement consumption on the inflammation-related diseases.

3. Experimental studies on underlying mechanisms involved in the relationship between dietary supplement and inflammation-related diseases.

Prof. Dr. Baiyi Lu
Dr. Fujie Yan
Dr. Xuan Yang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dietary supplement
  • inflammation-related diseases
  • molecular mechanisms
  • functional properties

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 5424 KiB  
Article
Effect of Cordyceps militaris Powder Prophylactic Supplementation on Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Impairment and Microbiota-Metabolites Axis in DSS-Injured Mice
by Shujian Wu, Zaoxuan Wu and Ye Chen
Nutrients 2023, 15(20), 4378; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15204378 - 16 Oct 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1612
Abstract
Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic and recurrent inflammatory disease with an unknown pathogenesis and increasing incidence. The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of prophylactic treatment with Cordyceps militaris on UC. The findings demonstrate that prophylactic supplementation of C. [...] Read more.
Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic and recurrent inflammatory disease with an unknown pathogenesis and increasing incidence. The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of prophylactic treatment with Cordyceps militaris on UC. The findings demonstrate that prophylactic supplementation of C. militaris powder effectively mitigates disease symptoms in DSS-injured mice, while also reducing the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, C. militaris powder enhances the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier by up-regulating MUC2 protein expression and improving tight junction proteins (ZO-1, occludin, and claudin 1) in DSS-injured mice. Multiomics integration analyses revealed that C. militaris powder not only reshaped gut microbiota composition, with an increase in Lactobacillus, Odoribacter, and Mucispirillum, but also exerted regulatory effects on various metabolic pathways including amino acid, glyoxylates, dicarboxylates, glycerophospholipids, and arachidonic acid. Subsequent analysis further elucidated the intricate interplay of gut microbiota, the intestinal mucosal barrier, and metabolites, suggesting that the microbiota–metabolite axis may involve the effect of C. militaris on intestinal mucosal barrier repair in UC. Moreover, in vitro experiments demonstrated that peptides and polysaccharides, derived from C. militaris, exerted an ability to change the gut microbiota structure of UC patients’ feces, particularly by promoting the growth of Lactobacillus. These findings suggest that regulatory properties of C. militaris on gut microbiota may underlie the potential mechanism responsible for the protective effect of C. militaris in UC. Consequently, our study will provide support for the utilization of C. militaris as a whole food-based ingredient against the occurrence and development of UC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplement and Inflammation-Related Diseases)
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17 pages, 2476 KiB  
Article
Protective Effects of Proanthocyanidin-Rich Fraction from Red Rice Germ and Bran on Lung Cell Inflammation via Inhibition of NF-κB/NLRP3 Inflammasome Pathway
by Warathit Semmarath, Kamonwan Srisawad, Punnida Arjsri, Sonthaya Umsumarng, Supachai Yodkeeree, Sansanee Jamjod, Chanakan Prom-u-thai and Pornngarm Dejkriengkraikul
Nutrients 2023, 15(17), 3793; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15173793 - 30 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1323
Abstract
The activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome pathway during infectious pathogen-induced immunopathology can lead to chronic inflammation and various adverse health outcomes. Identification of functional foods with anti-inflammatory properties is crucial for preventing inflammation triggered by NLRP3 inflammasome activation. This study aimed to investigate [...] Read more.
The activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome pathway during infectious pathogen-induced immunopathology can lead to chronic inflammation and various adverse health outcomes. Identification of functional foods with anti-inflammatory properties is crucial for preventing inflammation triggered by NLRP3 inflammasome activation. This study aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory properties of a proanthocyanidin-rich fraction obtained from red rice germ and bran against lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-induced condition in A549 lung cells. The proanthocyanidin-rich fraction from Yamuechaebia 3 red rice extract (YM3-PRF) was obtained using column chromatography with Sephadex LH20, and its total proanthocyanidin content was determined to be 351.43 ± 1.18 mg/g extract using the vanillin assay. A549 lung cells were pretreated with YM3-PRF at concentrations of 5–20 μg/mL prior to exposure to LPS (1 μg/mL) and ATP (5 nM). The results showed that YM3-PRF significantly inhibited the expression of inflammatory mRNAs (NLRP3, IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-18) and the secretion of cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-18) in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05). Mechanistically, YM3-PRF exerted its anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting NF-κB translocation and downregulating proteins associated with the NLRP3 inflammasome pathway (NLRP3, ASC, pro-caspase-1, and cleaved-caspase-1). These findings suggest that the proanthocyanidin-rich fraction from red rice germ and bran has protective effects and may serve as a potential therapeutic option for chronic inflammatory diseases associated with NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplement and Inflammation-Related Diseases)
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10 pages, 641 KiB  
Article
Association of Serum Calcium with the Risk of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Prospective Study from UK Biobank
by Xinglin Wan, Lulu Chen, Zheng Zhu, Pengfei Luo, Dong Hang, Jian Su, Ran Tao, Jinyi Zhou and Xikang Fan
Nutrients 2023, 15(15), 3439; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15153439 - 3 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1095
Abstract
Background: Although intracellular calcium had been demonstrated to involve in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the association between serum calcium and COPD risk remains unclear. Methods: We included 386,844 participants with serum calcium measurements and without airway obstruction at the [...] Read more.
Background: Although intracellular calcium had been demonstrated to involve in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the association between serum calcium and COPD risk remains unclear. Methods: We included 386,844 participants with serum calcium measurements and without airway obstruction at the baseline from UK Biobank. The restricted cubic splines were used to assess the dose–response relationship. Multivariable cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations of albumin-corrected calcium concentrations with the risk of COPD incidence and mortality. Results: During a median of 12.3 years of follow-up, 10,582 incident COPD cases were documented. A linear positive association was observed between serum calcium concentrations and the risk of COPD incidence. Compared to participants with normal serum calcium (2.19–2.56 mmol/L), a 14% higher risk of COPD was observed in hypercalcemic participants (≥2.56 mmol/L, HR = 1.14; 95% CI: 1.02–1.27). No significant effect modifications were observed in stratified variables. In survival analysis, 215 COPD-specific deaths were documented after a median survival time of 3.8 years. Compared to participants with normal serum calcium, hypercalcemic participants had a 109% (HR = 2.09, 95% CI: 1.15–3.81) increased risk for COPD-specific mortality. Conclusion: Our study indicated that hypercalcemia was associated with an elevated risk of COPD incidence and mortality in the European population, and suggested that serum calcium may have a potential impact on the progression of COPD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplement and Inflammation-Related Diseases)
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12 pages, 596 KiB  
Article
Curcumin Confers Anti-Inflammatory Effects in Adults Who Recovered from COVID-19 and Were Subsequently Vaccinated: A Randomized Controlled Trial
by Samantha N. Fessler, Yung Chang, Li Liu and Carol S. Johnston
Nutrients 2023, 15(7), 1548; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15071548 - 23 Mar 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 6128
Abstract
COVID-19 infection and vaccination offer disparate levels of defense against reinfection and breakthrough infection. This study was designed to examine the effects of curcumin supplementation, specifically HydroCurc (CURC), versus placebo (CON) on circulating inflammatory biomarkers in adults who had previously been diagnosed with [...] Read more.
COVID-19 infection and vaccination offer disparate levels of defense against reinfection and breakthrough infection. This study was designed to examine the effects of curcumin supplementation, specifically HydroCurc (CURC), versus placebo (CON) on circulating inflammatory biomarkers in adults who had previously been diagnosed with COVID-19 and subsequently received a primary series of monovalent vaccine doses. This study was conducted between June 2021 and May 2022. Participants were randomized to receive CURC (500 mg) or CON capsules twice daily for four weeks. Blood sampling was completed at baseline and week-4 and analyzed for biomarkers. Linear regression was utilized to examine the between-group differences in post-trial inflammatory biomarker levels, adjusting for baseline and covariates including age, sex, race/ethnicity, and interval between COVID-19 diagnosis and trial enrollment. The sample (n = 31) was 71% female (Age 27.6 ± 10.4 y). The CURC group exhibited significantly lower post-trial concentrations of proinflammatory IL-6 (β = −0.52, 95%CI: −1.03, −0.014, p = 0.046) and MCP-1 (β = −0.12, 95%CI: −0.23, −0.015, p = 0.027) compared to CON, adjusting for baseline and covariates. Curcumin intake confers anti-inflammatory activity and may be a promising prophylactic nutraceutical strategy for COVID-19. These results suggest that 4 weeks of curcumin supplementation resulted in significantly lower concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines in adults who recovered from COVID-19 infection and were subsequently vaccinated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplement and Inflammation-Related Diseases)
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