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Nutrition as Prevention and Treatment for Colorectal Cancer

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (5 May 2024) | Viewed by 2947

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Cancer Research, Flinders Health and Medical Research Institute, Flinders University, Adelaide 5042, Australia
Interests: nutritional epidemiology; colorectal cancer; dietary and behavioral intervention; risk prediction models; clinical nutrition

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Colorectal cancer is a common type of malignancy that affects the colon and rectum. While there are various treatment options for colorectal cancer, there is mounting evidence that suggests nutrition can play an important role in both preventing and treating the disease.

This Special Issue will focus on the role of nutrition in the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer. It will feature original research articles, meta-analyses or systematic reviews in the field. The Special Issue will cover a range of topics related to nutrition and advanced colorectal adenoma or colorectal cancer. The study population could range from average risk to high-risk populations for colorectal cancer. Studies of the role of nutrition for early-onset colorectal cancer are also welcome.

The Special Issue will provide a comprehensive overview of the latest research on nutrition and colorectal adenoma or cancer, highlighting the potential for nutrition interventions to improve outcomes for individuals with colorectal cancer or those who have had a prior history of colorectal cancer. It will also identify areas for future research and public health initiatives to promote healthy eating habits and reduce the burden of colorectal cancer.

Dr. Molla Wassie
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nutrients
  • dietary patterns
  • colorectal cancer
  • nutritional intervention
  • colorectal cancer prevention
  • cancer survivorship
  • lifestyle factors

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 2161 KiB  
Article
Low Adherence to Mediterranean Diet Characterizes Metabolic Patients with Gastrointestinal Cancer
by Carlo De Matteis, Lucilla Crudele, Raffaella Maria Gadaleta, Ersilia Di Buduo, Fabio Novielli, Stefano Petruzzelli, Marica Cariello and Antonio Moschetta
Nutrients 2024, 16(5), 630; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16050630 - 24 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1087
Abstract
Background. Gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are one of the most relevant causes of death globally, frequently associated with poor dietary patterns. The Mediterranean Diet (MedDiet) contributes to cancer prevention. To assess adherence to MedDiet, our research group validated a new score, the Chrono Med [...] Read more.
Background. Gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are one of the most relevant causes of death globally, frequently associated with poor dietary patterns. The Mediterranean Diet (MedDiet) contributes to cancer prevention. To assess adherence to MedDiet, our research group validated a new score, the Chrono Med Diet Score (CMDS), that captures increased visceral adiposity. Methods. We enrolled 401 subjects who underwent an evaluation for metabolic diseases and specific screening procedures according to current guidelines and were asked to answer CMDS. A total of 71 new cancer cases were recorded, including 40 GI and 31 non-gastrointestinal (NON-GI) cancers. Results. We found that CMDS was reduced in subjects who were diagnosed with cancers. Patients who reported a CMDS score of 12 or less had an over three times increased risk of being diagnosed with GI cancers and presented increased waist circumference and triglycerides and reduced HDL cholesterol compared to adherent subjects. Conclusions. Low CMDS values capture the risk for cancer diagnosis, especially for GI cancers. Thus, CMDS, along with waist circumference, can be considered as a bona fide marker for increased risk of cancer, requiring anticipated screening procedures for the detection of premalignant and early stage GI cancers in patients with low adherence to MedDiet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition as Prevention and Treatment for Colorectal Cancer)
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17 pages, 16698 KiB  
Article
Distributions and Trends of the Global Burden of Colorectal Cancer Attributable to Dietary Risk Factors over the Past 30 Years
by Yuxing Liang, Nan Zhang, Miao Wang, Yixin Liu, Linlu Ma, Qian Wang, Qian Yang, Xiaoyan Liu, Fuling Zhou and Yongchang Wei
Nutrients 2024, 16(1), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16010132 - 30 Dec 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1477
Abstract
Dietary risk has always been a major risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the contribution of dietary risk factors to CRC at the level of region, gender, and age has not been fully characterized. Based on the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) [...] Read more.
Dietary risk has always been a major risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the contribution of dietary risk factors to CRC at the level of region, gender, and age has not been fully characterized. Based on the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2019 study, the death rates, age-standardized mortality rates (ASDRs), and estimated annual percentage changes (EAPCs) were calculated to assess the trends of CRC attributable to dietary risk factors over the past 30 years. Globally, the death cases of CRC increased to 1,085,797 in 2019, and the number of deaths attributed to dietary risk factors increased to 365,752 in 2019, representing approximately one-third of all CRC-related fatalities. Overall, the ASDR attributable to dietary risks was 4.61 per 100,000 in 2019, with a slight downward trend (EAPC = −0.29). Notably, there is a rising trend in early-onset colorectal cancer mortality associated with dietary factors. To alleviate CRC burdens, it is recommended to elevate the intake of whole grains, milk, calcium, and fiber while reducing consumption of red and processed meats. The results will improve the understanding, and provide guidance on the diet of CRC in different regions, gender, and age groups worldwide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition as Prevention and Treatment for Colorectal Cancer)
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