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Nutrition Intervention in Gynecological Diseases

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition in Women".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 November 2023) | Viewed by 34401

Special Issue Editor

Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Women's Health, Surgery, University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65212, USA
Interests: breast cancer; obesity; nutrition; prevention; epigenetics; metabolism
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Gynecological diseases are a group of diseases involved in the female reproductive tract. These diseases include benign and malignant tumors, pregnancy-related diseases, inflammatory and endocrine diseases that can occur in the female reproductive system, including cervix, ovaries, uterus, vagina and vulva. There are different risk factors and etiological mechanisms involved in the development of gynecological diseases. Numerous studies have shown that nutritional factors and dietary habits play a significant role in development of gynecological diseases. Therefore, the exploration of effective chemopreventive and therapeutic approaches that can apply in gynecological diseases will be critically important and benefit women’s welfare.

This Specific Issue will focus on the advances of the association between dietary habits/intervention and gynecological disorders, and will discuss how dietary intervention can help to improve disease prevention and treatment efficacy in major gynecological diseases.

Dr. Yuanyuan Li
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • nutrition intervention
  • gynecological diseases
  • women’s health

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 1272 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Serum Zn, Cu, Mn, and Fe Concentration in Women with Endometrial Cancer and Different Endometrial Pathologies
by Kaja Michalczyk, Patrycja Kapczuk, Patrycja Kupnicka, Grzegorz Witczak, Barbara Michalczyk, Mateusz Bosiacki, Dariusz Chlubek and Aneta Cymbaluk-Płoska
Nutrients 2023, 15(16), 3605; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15163605 - 17 Aug 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1162
Abstract
Background: There is conflicting evidence on the effect of specific micronutrient concentration and cancer risk. In this study, we investigated the differences in serum zinc, copper, iron, and manganese levels and different endometrial pathologies, including endometrial cancer. Methods: 110 patients with a confirmed [...] Read more.
Background: There is conflicting evidence on the effect of specific micronutrient concentration and cancer risk. In this study, we investigated the differences in serum zinc, copper, iron, and manganese levels and different endometrial pathologies, including endometrial cancer. Methods: 110 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of endometrial cancer, benign uterine conditions (endometrial polyp, endometrial hyperplasia, uterine myoma), or normal endometrium were included in the study and assessed in terms of endometrial cancer risk factors. The measurements of serum micronutrients were conducted using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Results: When assessing for differences between serum concentrations of trace metals, we found significant differences in the distribution of Mn (p < 0.001) and Fe (0.034). There was also a significant difference in Cu/Zn ratio between the analyzed groups (p = 0.002). Patients’ BMI was found to influence Cu concentration, with obese patients having higher mean copper concentration (p = 0.006). Also, patients’ menopausal status was shown to influence Cu concentration with postmenopausal patients having higher Cu levels (p = 0.001). The menopausal status was found to influence Cu/Zn ratio (p = 0.002). Univariable regression analysis did not confirm that any of the micronutrients significantly influence the risk of endometrial cancer. Conclusion: The concentration of specific trace metals varies between different histopathological diagnoses of endometrial pathologies. Menopausal status and patient BMI are endometrial cancer risk factors impacted by the concentrations of Cu and Zn and their ratio. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Intervention in Gynecological Diseases)
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11 pages, 598 KiB  
Article
Associations of Dietary Intakes with Gynecological Cancers: Findings from a Cross-Sectional Study
by Guixian Zhu, Zengbin Li, Liqiong Tang, Mingwang Shen, Zhangjian Zhou, Yuhang Wei, Yang Zhao, Shuheng Bai and Lingqin Song
Nutrients 2022, 14(23), 5026; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14235026 - 25 Nov 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3360
Abstract
Background: Gynecological cancers, including cervical cancer, ovarian cancer and endometrial cancer are leading causes of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Diet plays an important role in cancer development, which is widely accepted. However, the associations between dietary intakes and gynecological cancers remain unclear. [...] Read more.
Background: Gynecological cancers, including cervical cancer, ovarian cancer and endometrial cancer are leading causes of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Diet plays an important role in cancer development, which is widely accepted. However, the associations between dietary intakes and gynecological cancers remain unclear. Methods: A total of 12,437 women aged over 20 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), conducted from 2007–2016, were included in this study. The relationships between 30 dietary factors (4 macronutrients, 15 vitamins, 9 minerals, caffeine and alcohol) and gynecological cancers were assessed. Results: We observed negative correlations of intakes of phosphorus (odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence interval (CI); 0.998 (0.996, 0.999), p = 0.002) with cervical cancer, and intakes of vitamin B12 (0.812 (0.714, 0.925), p = 0.002), phosphorus (0.997 (0.996, 0.999), p < 0.001) and alcohol (0.971 (0.950, 0.992), p = 0.009) with endometrial cancer. The data showed positive associations of intake of caffeine (1.002 (1.001, 1.003), p = 0.003) with cervical cancer, and intake of copper (2.754 (1.313, 5.778), p = 0.009) with endometrial cancer. In addition, we found potential negative correlations between intake of vitamin B1 (p = 0.025) and cervical cancer; zinc (p = 0.048) and ovarian cancer; and potassium (p = 0.032) and endometrial cancer. Potential positive associations were found between intake of calcium and cervical cancer (p = 0.026) and endometrial cancer (p = 0.034), and between sodium (p = 0.042) and endometrial cancer. Intakes of protein, total sugars, total fat, cholesterol, vitamin A, alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, vitamin B2, niacin, vitamin B6, food folate, vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin E, vitamin K, magnesium, iron and selenium showed no relationship with gynecological cancers (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Specific dietary factors were associated with gynecological cancers. More epidemiological studies are needed to validate our results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Intervention in Gynecological Diseases)
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11 pages, 428 KiB  
Article
Does the Ketogenic Diet Improve the Quality of Ovarian Function in Obese Women?
by Maria Cristina Magagnini, Rosita A. Condorelli, Laura Cimino, Rossella Cannarella, Antonio Aversa, Aldo E. Calogero and Sandro La Vignera
Nutrients 2022, 14(19), 4147; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14194147 - 06 Oct 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3727
Abstract
Background: Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age, the prevalence of which ranges from 8 to 13%. It is characterized by metabolic, reproductive, and psychological alterations. PCOS prevalence is related to body mass index (BMI). [...] Read more.
Background: Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age, the prevalence of which ranges from 8 to 13%. It is characterized by metabolic, reproductive, and psychological alterations. PCOS prevalence is related to body mass index (BMI). Women with BMI < 25 kg/m2 have a prevalence of 4.3%, whereas women with BMI > 30 kg/m2 have a prevalence of 14%. Moreover, women with PCOS have a risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) two-fold higher than controls, independently of BMI. Both PCOS and T2DM are also consequences of lower serum sex-hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels, which is currently considered a biomarker of metabolic disorders, in particular T2DM. Aim: To evaluate the effect of the very-low-calorie ketogenic diet (VLCKD) on markers suggested to be predictive of metabolic and ovulatory dysfunction. These comprehend SHBG, anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH), and progesterone levels on day 21 of the menstrual cycle in a cohort of obese non-diabetic women with PCOS and regular menses. Methods: Twenty-five patients (mean age 25.4 ± 3.44 years) with obesity and PCOS underwent VLCKD for 12 weeks. Each of them underwent measurements of anthropometric parameters (body weight, height, and waist circumference) and blood testing to evaluate serum levels of SHBG, AMH, and progesterone before and after 12 weeks of VLCKD. Results: At enrollment, all patients had high BMI, WC, and AMH, whereas SHBG and progesterone levels were low. After VLCKD, the patients showed a significant reduction in BMI, WC, and HOMA index. In particular, 76% of patients (19/25) switched from obesity to overweight, and the HOMA index normalized, reaching values lower than 2.5 in 96% (24/25) of patients. In addition, serum AMH levels significantly decreased, and progesterone and SHBG significantly increased after VLCKD. Conclusions: This is the first study documenting the effects of VLCKD on ovarian reserve and luteal function in women with PCOS. VLCKD could be used to improve metabolic and ovulatory dysfunction in women with PCOS. Further studies are needed to understand the reasons for the AMH reduction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Intervention in Gynecological Diseases)
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Review

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12 pages, 501 KiB  
Review
The Role of Nutrition in Pathogenesis of Uterine Fibroids
by Jarosław Krzyżanowski, Tomasz Paszkowski and Sławomir Woźniak
Nutrients 2023, 15(23), 4984; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15234984 - 01 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2994
Abstract
Uterine fibroids are benign tumors that arise from the smooth muscle tissue of the uterus and are the most common tumors in women. Due to their high prevalence, costs for the health care system and the substantial impact on women’s quality of life, [...] Read more.
Uterine fibroids are benign tumors that arise from the smooth muscle tissue of the uterus and are the most common tumors in women. Due to their high prevalence, costs for the health care system and the substantial impact on women’s quality of life, they are a significant public health concern. Previous literature on the impact of diet on the occurrence, growth and symptoms of fibroids is limited. Recently, many papers have been written on this topic. A scoping review of PubMed and Cochrane databases was performed using the following keywords: uterine fibroids, antioxidants, diet, diet, vegetarian, vegetables, fruits, meat and soy foods, dairy products, tea, vitamin D, vitamin C, ascorbic acid. Preliminary research has shown a beneficial effect of vegetable and fruit consumption on the occurrence of fibroids. A relationship between hypovitaminosis D and an increased risk of fibroids has also been demonstrated. Studies on epigallocatechin gallate showed its apoptosis-promoting and antifibrinolytic effect in fibroid cells. Initial results are promising, but further randomized trials are needed to draw firm conclusions about the effects of diet and nutrients on uterine fibroids. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Intervention in Gynecological Diseases)
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16 pages, 616 KiB  
Review
The Role of Selected Dietary Factors in the Development and Course of Endometriosis
by Anna Markowska, Michał Antoszczak, Janina Markowska and Adam Huczyński
Nutrients 2023, 15(12), 2773; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15122773 - 16 Jun 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2370
Abstract
Endometriosis is a chronic disease with a complex, heterogeneous pathogenesis that affects about 10% of women of reproductive age, causing pain and leading to infertility. Treatment consists of administering pharmacological agents (resulting in a reduction of estrogen levels and inflammation), as well as [...] Read more.
Endometriosis is a chronic disease with a complex, heterogeneous pathogenesis that affects about 10% of women of reproductive age, causing pain and leading to infertility. Treatment consists of administering pharmacological agents (resulting in a reduction of estrogen levels and inflammation), as well as the surgical removal of endometriotic lesions. Unfortunately, despite a wide range of available therapies, there is still a high recurrence rate after surgery. Consequently, it is necessary to improve the outcome of patients with endometriosis. In this context, there is growing interest in possible dietary modification to support or complement classic treatment options and even serve as a potential alternative to hormone therapy. In addition, a growing number of studies indicate positive effects of selected dietary factors on the development and course of endometriosis. This review article focuses on the potentially beneficial effects of compounds from the polyphenol group (curcumin, epigallocatechin gallate, quercetin, resveratrol), vitamins, and selected micronutrients on endometriosis. The results indicate the potential of the selected ingredients in fighting the disease. However, most of the studies have been performed on experimental animal models, with a smaller proportion looking at the actual effects of use among women. Therefore, well-designed studies are needed to assess the importance of a well-chosen diet and the effects of specific dietary factors on the health of women suffering from endometriosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Intervention in Gynecological Diseases)
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12 pages, 311 KiB  
Review
I Am the 1 in 10—What Should I Eat? A Research Review of Nutrition in Endometriosis
by Małgorzata Piecuch, Jagoda Garbicz, Martyna Waliczek, Jolanta Malinowska-Borowska and Piotr Rozentryt
Nutrients 2022, 14(24), 5283; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14245283 - 11 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 6980
Abstract
Endometriosis is a chronic, painful, estrogen-related inflammatory disease that affects approximately 10% of the female population. Endometriosis has a significant negative impact on quality of life. Nutrition may be involved in the development and severity of endometriosis. The purpose of this paper is [...] Read more.
Endometriosis is a chronic, painful, estrogen-related inflammatory disease that affects approximately 10% of the female population. Endometriosis has a significant negative impact on quality of life. Nutrition may be involved in the development and severity of endometriosis. The purpose of this paper is to discuss in detail the nutritional recommendations for patients with endometriosis. This article discusses the importance of nutrients such as polyphenols, vitamins C, D and E, PUFAs, and iron in the development of endometriosis. Alternative diets, such as the Mediterranean, anti-inflammatory, vegetarian, low-nickel and low-FODMAP diets, have also been presented in the context of their potential beneficial effects on the course of endometriosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Intervention in Gynecological Diseases)
24 pages, 1479 KiB  
Review
Dietary Impacts on Gestational Diabetes: Connection between Gut Microbiome and Epigenetic Mechanisms
by Taiwo Bankole, Hung Winn and Yuanyuan Li
Nutrients 2022, 14(24), 5269; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14245269 - 10 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3203
Abstract
Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the most common obstetric complications due to an increased level of glucose intolerance during pregnancy. The prevalence of GDM increases due to the obesity epidemic. GDM is also associated with an increased risk of gestational hypertension [...] Read more.
Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the most common obstetric complications due to an increased level of glucose intolerance during pregnancy. The prevalence of GDM increases due to the obesity epidemic. GDM is also associated with an increased risk of gestational hypertension and preeclampsia resulting in elevated maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Diet is one of the most important environmental factors associated with etiology of GDM. Studies have shown that the consumption of certain bioactive diets and nutrients before and during pregnancy might have preventive effects against GDM leading to a healthy pregnancy outcome as well as beneficial metabolic outcomes later in the offspring’s life. Gut microbiome as a biological ecosystem bridges the gap between human health and diseases through diets. Maternal diets affect maternal and fetal gut microbiome and metabolomics profiles, which consequently regulate the host epigenome, thus contributing to later-life metabolic health in both mother and offspring. This review discusses the current knowledge regarding how epigenetic mechanisms mediate the interaction between maternal bioactive diets, the gut microbiome and the metabolome leading to improved metabolic health in both mother and offspring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Intervention in Gynecological Diseases)
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Other

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15 pages, 1045 KiB  
Systematic Review
Effect of Vitamin D Supplementation on Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials
by Yi-Chun Chen, Yi-Fen Chiang, Ying-Jiun Lin, Ko-Chieh Huang, Hsin-Yuan Chen, Nadia M. Hamdy, Tsui-Chin Huang, Hsin-Yi Chang, Tzong-Ming Shieh, Yun-Ju Huang and Shih-Min Hsia
Nutrients 2023, 15(13), 2830; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15132830 - 21 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 5113
Abstract
Dysmenorrhea causes pain and inconvenience during menstruation. In addition to medication, natural compounds are widely used to relieve various types of pain. In this study, we aimed to assess the effects of vitamin D (vit. D) supplementation in relieving the symptoms of primary [...] Read more.
Dysmenorrhea causes pain and inconvenience during menstruation. In addition to medication, natural compounds are widely used to relieve various types of pain. In this study, we aimed to assess the effects of vitamin D (vit. D) supplementation in relieving the symptoms of primary dysmenorrhea. A comprehensive systematic database search of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed. Oral forms of vit. D supplementation were included and compared with a placebo or standard care. The degree of dysmenorrhea pain was measured with a visual analogue scale or numerical rating scale. Outcomes were compared using the standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in a meta-analysis. RCTs were assessed using the Cochrane risk-of-bias v2 (RoB 2) tool. The meta-analysis included 8 randomized controlled trials involving 695 participants. The results of the quantitative analysis showed a significantly lower degree of pain in the vit. D versus placebo in those with dysmenorrhea (SMD: −1.404, 95% CI: −2.078 to −0.731). The results of subgroup analysis revealed that pain lessened when the average weekly dose of vit. D was over 50,000 IU, in which dysmenorrhea was relieved regardless of whether vit. D was administered for more or less than 70 days and in any dose interval. The results revealed that vit. D treatment substantially reduced the pain level in the primary dysmenorrhea population. We concluded that vit. D supplementation is an alternative treatment for relieving the pain symptoms of dysmenorrhea. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Intervention in Gynecological Diseases)
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16 pages, 741 KiB  
Systematic Review
The Effect of Vitamin E Supplementation in Postmenopausal Women—A Systematic Review
by Stepan Feduniw, Lidia Korczyńska, Konrad Górski, Magdalena Zgliczyńska, Monika Bączkowska, Maciej Byrczak, Jakub Kociuba, Mohamed Ali and Michał Ciebiera
Nutrients 2023, 15(1), 160; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15010160 - 29 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 4598
Abstract
Menopause is a physiological change in any woman. Nevertheless, its symptoms could be difficult to accept, and hormone therapy can be sometimes unattractive or contraindicated. Vitamin E components are phytoestrogens, so they are believed to be useful in some indications including menopause. This [...] Read more.
Menopause is a physiological change in any woman. Nevertheless, its symptoms could be difficult to accept, and hormone therapy can be sometimes unattractive or contraindicated. Vitamin E components are phytoestrogens, so they are believed to be useful in some indications including menopause. This review aimed to assess the available evidence on the effectiveness of vitamin E in alleviating menopausal symptoms. The Pubmed/MEDLINE, Cochrane Library and Scopus databases were screened. All types of studies that assessed the effectiveness of vitamin E in alleviating menopausal symptoms were included. The PICO question was: “How does vitamin E supplementation affect menopausal symptom occurrence?” The PROSPERO ID number of this review is CRD42022328830. After quality assessment, 16 studies were included in the analysis. The studies were divided into three groups in which the influence of vitamin E on the genital syndrome of menopause, vasomotor symptoms and vascular and metabolic changes were assessed. Vitamin E influences postmenopausal hot flashes, vascular modulation, plasma lipid profile level and vaginal changes. Compared to vitamin E, estrogen administration leads to better clinical effects. Nevertheless, vitamin E might serve as additive to hormone therapy and its alternative in women with contraindications to estrogens. More quality data are necessary to draw final conclusions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Intervention in Gynecological Diseases)
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