Dietary Ancient Grains: Gluten-Free Cereals and Pseudocereals and Their Role in Human Health

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2024 | Viewed by 1476

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Molecular and Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Curtin University, Perth, Australia
Interests: grains, sorghum, and pulses; grains and chronic disease; grains and nutraceuticals; grains and novel biomaterials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Co-Guest Editor
School of Molecular and Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Curtin University, Perth, Australia
Interests: grains, legumes, and cereals; plant proteins, modification and functionality; food matrices, grains and nutrition
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleague,

We are very excited to advise you of the Nutrients Special Issue “Dietary Ancient Grains: Gluten-Free Cereals and Pseudocereals and Their Role in Human Health". This includes the following grains: legumes, sorghum, millets, quinoa, buckwheat, fonio, amaranth, and wild rice.

In recent years, healthy dietary preferences have resulted in a rise in the consumption of ancient or primitive grains. The more primitive forms and simple processing methods of ancient grains can retain more nutrients. Scientific studies have confirmed that eating whole grains can reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and more. These nutrients are embedded in ancient grains, from dietary fibre to B vitamins, protein, magnesium, iron, and more. In addition to minimal processing, without any additives, the GI values of ancient grains are generally lower than those of refined foods, making them suitable for health-conscious consumers.

We invite you to submit relevant manuscripts on ancient grains, human diet, and health. We also aim to cover new and challenging topics within the Special Issue.

Dr. Rewati Bhattarai
Dr. Stuart Johnson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • human nutrition
  • diet
  • dietary fibres
  • ancient grains
  • grains and nutrition
  • protein
  • phytochemicals
  • glycemic index

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

18 pages, 4439 KiB  
Article
Glycemic Response in Nonhuman Primates Fed Gluten-Free Rice Cakes Enriched with Soy, Pea, or Rice Protein and Its Correlation with Nutrient Composition
by Yong Yang, Qingsu Liu and Feng Yue
Nutrients 2024, 16(2), 234; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16020234 - 11 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1185
Abstract
Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic disease caused by the consumption of gluten foods and is closely related to type 1 diabetes (T1D). Adherence to a gluten-free (GF) diet is the cornerstone of treating CD, and certain plant proteins added to GF foods [...] Read more.
Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic disease caused by the consumption of gluten foods and is closely related to type 1 diabetes (T1D). Adherence to a gluten-free (GF) diet is the cornerstone of treating CD, and certain plant proteins added to GF foods affect blood glucose to varying degrees. The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the changes in glycemic index (GI) and incremental area under the postprandial glucose tolerance curve (IAUC) of various foods through consumption of GF foods supplemented with certain plant proteins in non-human primates. The test foods were GF rice cakes with 5%, 10%, and 15% added single plant proteins (rice protein, soy protein, and pea protein) mixed with rice flour, as well as 5%, 10%, and 15% gluten rice cakes, and rice flour alone, for a total of 13 food items, and 12 healthy cynomolgus monkeys were examined for their glucose levels in the blood after fasting and after eating each test food (50 g) for 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after fasting and eating each test food. Fingertip blood glucose levels were measured, and the nutrient content of each food, including protein, fat, starch, ash, and amino acids, was examined. All foods tested had a low GI (<50) when analyzed using one-way ANOVA and nonparametric tests. Postprandial IAUC was significantly lower (p < 0.05) for GF rice cakes with 15% pea protein (499.81 ± 34.46) compared to GF rice cakes with 5% pea protein (542.19 ± 38.78), 15% soy protein (572.94 ± 72.74), and 15% rice protein (530.50 ± 14.65), and GF rice cakes with 15% wheat bran protein (533.19 ± 34.89). A multiple regression analysis showed that glycine was negatively associated with IAUC in GF rice cakes with 5%, 10%, and 15% pea protein added (p = 0.0031 < 0.01). Fat was negatively correlated with IAUC in GF rice cakes supplemented with 5%, 10%, and 15% soy protein (p = 0.0024 < 0.01). In this study, GF rice cakes made with added pea protein were superior to other gluten and GF rice cakes and had a small effect on postprandial glucose. Full article
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