Nutrition and Lifestyle Interventions for Frailty and Sarcopenia

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Geriatric Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 January 2025 | Viewed by 9827

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Sengkang General Hospital, 110 Sengkang East Way, Singapore 544886, Singapore
Interests: frailty; intrinsic capacity; sarcopenia; cognitive disorders

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Although considered distinct clinical syndromes, frailty and sarcopenia share common manifestations, such as slowness and weakness, frequently co-occur, and predispose the patient to a loss of functional independence, premature mortality and decline in quality of life. Malnutrition features among the common contributors to both key conditions. Despite their complex and multi-factorial underpinnings, there is consistent evidence that both frailty and sarcopenia are potentially preventable and reversible. However, the mechanisms by which multi-domain interventions impact on sarcopenia and/or frailty remain incompletely understood. Taking into account the World Health Organization (WHO)-proposed model of healthy ageing, it is also timely to explore how addressing sarcopenia and frailty may support the functional ability necessary to enable well-being in older age.

This Special Issue aims to compile research into the impact of lifestyle interventions on frailty and sarcopenia, work which is increasingly pertinent as we strive to support a globally ageing population.

Dr. Laura Bg Tay
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • frailty
  • sarcopenia
  • nutrition
  • multidomain

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 925 KiB  
Article
Pro-Inflammatory Diets Are Associated with Frailty in an Urban Middle-Aged African American and White Cohort
by Marie Fanelli Kuczmarski, May A. Beydoun, Michael F. Georgescu, Nicole Noren Hooten, Nicolle A. Mode, Michele K. Evans and Alan B. Zonderman
Nutrients 2023, 15(21), 4598; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15214598 - 29 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1144
Abstract
Diet quality is a modifiable risk factor for frailty, but research on the association of frailty with dietary inflammatory potential is limited. The objective was to determine associations between diet quality assessed by the dietary inflammatory index (DII) with frailty status over time. [...] Read more.
Diet quality is a modifiable risk factor for frailty, but research on the association of frailty with dietary inflammatory potential is limited. The objective was to determine associations between diet quality assessed by the dietary inflammatory index (DII) with frailty status over time. Participants with both dietary and frailty data from the longitudinal Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span (HANDLS) study were used (n = 2901, 43.5% male, 43.8% African American, 48.5 y mean baseline age, with a mean 8.7 y of follow-up). Group-based trajectory modeling identified two frailty (remaining non-frail or being pre-frail/frail over time) and three diet quality trajectory groups (high or medium pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory potentials). Multiple logistic regression found both medium pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory DII trajectory groups, compared to the high pro-inflammatory group, were positively associated with being non-frail over time for the overall sample, both sexes and races. Kaplan–Meier curves and log-rank test revealed anti-inflammatory DII scores were associated with lower risk for being pre-frail or frail. No longitudinal relationship existed between frailty status at baseline and annualized DII change, a check on reverse causality. This study contributes to our current knowledge providing longitudinal evidence of the link between anti-inflammatory DII score with lower frailty risk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Lifestyle Interventions for Frailty and Sarcopenia)
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14 pages, 1037 KiB  
Article
Midlife Life’s Simple 7, Psychosocial Health, and Physical Frailty, Hospital Frailty, and Comprehensive Frailty 10 Years Later
by Qi Wang, Chunmiao Zhou, Caiyun Dong, Jiajun Zhang, Ziwei Xie, Huizi Sun, Chunying Fu, Wenting Hao and Dongshan Zhu
Nutrients 2023, 15(10), 2412; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15102412 - 22 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1671
Abstract
This study aims to examine the associations between midlife Life’s Simple 7 (LS7) status, psychosocial health (social isolation and loneliness), and late-life multidimensional frailty indicators, and to investigate their synergistic effect on frailty. We used cohort data from the UK Biobank. Frailty was [...] Read more.
This study aims to examine the associations between midlife Life’s Simple 7 (LS7) status, psychosocial health (social isolation and loneliness), and late-life multidimensional frailty indicators, and to investigate their synergistic effect on frailty. We used cohort data from the UK Biobank. Frailty was assessed using physical frailty phenotype, hospital frailty risk score, and frailty index. Cox proportional-hazards models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) on the association between the LS7 score, psychosocial health, and frailty. For the association of LS7 with physical and comprehensive frailty, 39,047 individuals were included. After a median follow-up of 9.0 years, 1329 (3.4%) people were identified with physical frailty, and 5699 (14.6%) with comprehensive frailty. For the association of LS7 with hospital frailty, 366,570 people were included. After a median follow-up of 12.0 years, 18,737 (5.1%) people were identified with hospital frailty. Compared to people with a poor LS7 score, those with an intermediate (physical frailty: 0.64, 0.54–0.77; hospital frailty: 0.60, 0.58–0.62; and comprehensive frailty: 0.77, 0.69–0.86) and optimal LS7 score (physical frailty: 0.31, 0.25–0.39; hospital frailty: 0.39, 0.37–0.41; and comprehensive frailty: 0.62, 0.55–0.69) were associated with a lower risk of frailty. Poor psychosocial health was associated with an increased risk of frailty. People who had a poor psychosocial status and poor LS7 score had the highest risk of frailty. A better LS7 score in midlife was associated with a reduced risk of physical, hospital, and comprehensive frailty. There was a synergistic effect of psychosocial status and LS7 on frailty. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Lifestyle Interventions for Frailty and Sarcopenia)
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15 pages, 1720 KiB  
Article
Efficacy of Dietary Intervention with Group Activities on Dietary Intakes, Frailty Status, and Working Memory: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial in Community Strongholds
by Szu-Yun Wu, Yu-Yao Cheng, Hsing-Yi Chang, Pei-Hsuan Wang, I-Ching Hsieh, Nai-Hua Yeh, Kuo-Chin Huang and Wen-Harn Pan
Nutrients 2023, 15(8), 1976; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15081976 - 19 Apr 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1815
Abstract
Geriatric community centers often offer nutrition lectures to older adults. In order to make learning more interesting and pragmatic, we developed group activity sessions. This undertaking was tested for its efficacy in changes of frailty status and several other geriatric health parameters. A [...] Read more.
Geriatric community centers often offer nutrition lectures to older adults. In order to make learning more interesting and pragmatic, we developed group activity sessions. This undertaking was tested for its efficacy in changes of frailty status and several other geriatric health parameters. A cluster-randomized controlled trial was conducted between September 2018 and December 2019 at 13 luncheon-providing community strongholds in Taipei, Taiwan. During the 3-month intervention period, 6 experimental strongholds received a weekly 1 h exercise workout and 1 h nutrition activities aiming at achieving the recommendations of the Taiwanese Daily Food Guide for elderlies; the other 7 received a weekly 1 h exercise workout and 1 h other activities. Dietary intakes and frailty status were the primary outcomes. Secondary outcomes included working memory and depression. The measurements were performed at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. The nutrition intervention significantly reduced the intake of refined grains and roots (p = 0.003) and increased that of non-refined grains and roots (p = 0.008), dairy products (p < 0.0001), and seeds and nuts (at borderline, p = 0.080) at 3 months. Some, but not all, of these changes were maintained at 6 months. Performance improvements included the frailty status score (p = 0.036) and forward digit span (p = 0.004), a working memory parameter, at 3 months. Only the forward digit span remained improved (p = 0.007) at 6 months. The 3-month nutrition group activities combined with exercise sessions improved the frailty status and working memory more than exercise alone. The dietary and frailty improvements were accompanied by improved dietary intakes and advanced behavioral stages. However, the improved frailty status backslid after intervention ceased, suggesting that boosting activities are needed for maintaining the intervention effect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Lifestyle Interventions for Frailty and Sarcopenia)
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Review

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27 pages, 4775 KiB  
Review
The Integral Role of Magnesium in Muscle Integrity and Aging: A Comprehensive Review
by Ana Carolina Remondi Souza, Andrea Rodrigues Vasconcelos, Denise Deo Dias, Geovana Komoni and José João Name
Nutrients 2023, 15(24), 5127; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15245127 - 16 Dec 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4738
Abstract
Aging is characterized by significant physiological changes, with the degree of decline varying significantly among individuals. The preservation of intrinsic capacity over the course of an individual’s lifespan is fundamental for healthy aging. Locomotion, which entails the capacity for independent movement, is intricately [...] Read more.
Aging is characterized by significant physiological changes, with the degree of decline varying significantly among individuals. The preservation of intrinsic capacity over the course of an individual’s lifespan is fundamental for healthy aging. Locomotion, which entails the capacity for independent movement, is intricately connected with various dimensions of human life, including cognition, vitality, sensory perception, and psychological well-being. Notably, skeletal muscle functions as a pivotal nexus within this intricate framework. Any perturbation in its functionality can manifest as compromised physical performance and an elevated susceptibility to frailty. Magnesium is an essential mineral that plays a central role in approximately 800 biochemical reactions within the human body. Its distinctive physical and chemical attributes render it an indispensable stabilizing factor in the orchestration of diverse cellular reactions and organelle functions, thereby rendering it irreplaceable in processes directly impacting muscle health. This narrative review offers a comprehensive exploration of the pivotal role played by magnesium in maintaining skeletal muscle integrity, emphasizing the critical importance of maintaining optimal magnesium levels for promoting healthy aging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Lifestyle Interventions for Frailty and Sarcopenia)
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