Nutrition, Diet Components and Healthy Weight

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Obesity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 August 2024 | Viewed by 2557

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Departments of Public Health and Pediatrics, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27834, USA
Interests: pediatrics; childhood obesity; community level obesity prevention; quality improvement methods in primary care; education of medical students and residents in population health; prevention and quality improvement methods

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Guest Editor
Department of Public Health, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27834, USA
Interests: nutrition; obesity; dietary assessment; environmental and policy change to improve diet and physical activity in underserved populations

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research on diet quality and healthy weight remains at a critical crossroads in our field. While there have been ground-breaking studies in these areas, there is much more work to be done to clearly elucidate effective measurement tools to assess prevention efforts and intervention efficacy related to nutrition and healthy weight. Research is needed to determine methods to effectively measure diet quality and the most impactful strategies and interventions to improve diet quality related to health and healthy weight. Better understanding of aspects of diet quality and energy regulation at different stages of development will inform the field of obesity prevention and health promotion across the world.

This Special Issue will include manuscripts that focus on nutrition, diet components, and food purchasing behaviors in relation to obesity, healthy weight status, weight management and diet quality. We are excited and welcome papers from researchers around the world which investigate the topic of nutrition and diet components in relation to healthy weight. The content may be useful for public health and clinical practitioners as well as public health nutrition researchers. We hope you will consider submitting a paper to this Special Issue!

Prof. Dr. Suzanne Lazorick
Dr. Stephanie Jilcott Pitts
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • healthy
  • weight
  • weight management
  • diet quality
  • youth
  • adolescents
  • children

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

10 pages, 248 KiB  
Article
Longitudinal Patterns of Beverage Intake in Treatment-Seeking Children with Obesity in Eastern NC Using the Validated BEVQ-15
by Zahra Mohseni, Dmitry Tumin, David N. Collier, Natalie Taft and Suzanne Lazorick
Nutrients 2023, 15(19), 4171; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15194171 - 27 Sep 2023
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Abstract
Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption remains a major target for interventions to treat severe obesity in children. Understanding how total energy consumption is divided among different types of beverages remains unclear. This study retrospectively examined how the consumption of beverage calories (kcal) from 100% [...] Read more.
Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption remains a major target for interventions to treat severe obesity in children. Understanding how total energy consumption is divided among different types of beverages remains unclear. This study retrospectively examined how the consumption of beverage calories (kcal) from 100% fruit juice and SSBs, and body mass index, assessed as a percent of the 95th sex- and age-specific percentile (%of 95BMI), changed during the treatment of children with obesity aged 2–18 years. Treatment was provided by an integrative multi-disciplinary team, comprising a physician, a dietician/ nutritionist and a behavioralist employing motivational interviewing and a small change approach to promote improved sustainable health habits and induce a net negative energy balance. The sample included 155 patients, with 341 visits. The median age was 11 years, 60% were girls, and there was a median follow-up of 3.1 months. At baseline, the median %of 95BMI was 135 and the median kcal/day intake was 436 from juice and 263 from SSB. For each additional 100 kcal consumed/day from SSB and juice, the %of 95BMI increased by 1.4 percentage points. In the follow-up, each additional month was associated with 7 fewer kcal/day from SSB and juice combined, with a 0.5 percentage point increase in %of 95BMI. Children in this treatment program consumed fewer calories from SSB over time, although the %of 95BMI did not decrease. SSBs other than soda accounted for the majority of beverage kcal intake, therefore potentially providing a targeted direction for interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Diet Components and Healthy Weight)
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9 pages, 564 KiB  
Article
A Pilot Study Examining the Association of Parental Stress and Household Food Insecurity with Dietary Quality in Pre-School-Aged Children
by Madison McCarthy, Mara Z. Vitolins, Joseph A. Skelton, Edward H. Ip and Callie L. Brown
Nutrients 2023, 15(14), 3154; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15143154 - 14 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1116
Abstract
Adequate dietary quality is necessary for children’s appropriate development and may be influenced by family factors. This study with 24 healthy 3–5-year-old children assessed the associations of parental stress and household food insecurity (HFI) with a child’s dietary quality. Parents completed three 24 [...] Read more.
Adequate dietary quality is necessary for children’s appropriate development and may be influenced by family factors. This study with 24 healthy 3–5-year-old children assessed the associations of parental stress and household food insecurity (HFI) with a child’s dietary quality. Parents completed three 24 h dietary recalls, and the Healthy Eating Index was calculated to assess dietary quality. Parents also completed a questionnaire, including The Perceived Stress Scale (assessing overall parental stress) and the Hunger Vital Sign screen (assessing HFI). Children’s height/weight were measured, and BMIz was calculated. Separate multivariable linear regression models assessed the association of dietary quality components with HFI and parental stress, adjusting for household income, child sex, and child BMI z-score. In bivariate analyses, children with HFI consumed more added sugars, and parental stress was associated with the child’s greens/beans intake. In multivariable analysis, HFI was associated with lower total protein scores and higher added sugar intake, while parental stress was associated with lower greens/beans intake. Higher household income was associated with higher total vegetable and sodium intake, and children with a higher BMIz had a lower total protein intake. Parental stress and HFI can impact a child’s dietary quality; providers should counsel families on strategies to improve diet quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Diet Components and Healthy Weight)
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