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Screen Time, Dietary Intake, and Obesity

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Obesity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 March 2024) | Viewed by 1992

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Health Sciences, Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, 635 Commonwealth Ave, Boston, MA 02215, USA
Interests: eating patterns; meal timing; dietary composition; taste preferences; sleep patterns; physical activity; appetite; obesity; energy regulation; chronic disease risk; psychological factors; dietary assessment methodology; wearable technology
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of electronic devices is currently extremely common. Many studies have indicated that eating while watching TV is a risk factor for obesity. This could work through several mechanisms, including food advertising, increasing mindless eating, social facilitation, and taking time away from calorie-burning activities. There are fewer studies on eating while using devices and screens other than TV. Thus, while their use is increasingly common, much less is known about whether smartphones, tablets, computers, video gaming, and the like have an influence on or association with dietary intake. There is also little information on the effect of the use of multiple devices simultaneously, and the effects (if any) of screen time in conjunction with different physical activity levels, age groups, and socioeconomic levels on eating behavior, dietary intake, and body weight. Eating and sleeping patterns, screen time, and other lifestyle factors all influence each other, and may cause obesity through a confluence of circumstances and behaviors.

The aim of this Special Issue is to bring together the latest research on these topics. Submitted original studies, narrative and systematic reviews, and meta-analyses will be included. Studies of the effects of screen time and dietary intake on obesity are welcome.

Dr. Megan A. McCrory
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • screen time
  • meal time
  • dietary pattern
  • sleep
  • obesity
  • appetite
  • physical activity
  • exercise
  • distraction
  • media multitasking

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

13 pages, 737 KiB  
Article
Association between Types of Screen Time and Weight Status during the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Longitudinal Study in Children and Adolescents
by Yujie Liu, Xiaomin Sun, Erliang Zhang, Huilun Li, Xin Ge, Fan Hu, Yong Cai and Mi Xiang
Nutrients 2023, 15(9), 2055; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15092055 - 24 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1644
Abstract
Background: This study aimed to investigate the changes in distinct types of screen time and explore their longitudinal association with children and adolescents’ weight status. Methods: A two-wave longitudinal study was conducted among 2228 children and adolescents (6–19 years) in Shanghai, China, before [...] Read more.
Background: This study aimed to investigate the changes in distinct types of screen time and explore their longitudinal association with children and adolescents’ weight status. Methods: A two-wave longitudinal study was conducted among 2228 children and adolescents (6–19 years) in Shanghai, China, before and during the pandemic. Recreational screen time (watching TV/videos, online gaming, using social media, and browsing webpages), educational screen time (online homework and online class), and BMI were measured using a self-reported questionnaire. Mixed-effects models were constructed to assess the associations between screen time and weight status. Results: The prevalence of overweight and obesity was 20.5% and 10.2% at baseline, respectively. Both recreational and educational screen time increased significantly over two months. While recreational screen time was found to be a risk factor for obesity, it was not the case for educational screen use. Specifically, adolescents who spent more time watching TV/videos had a higher obesity risk (OR = 1.576). No significant associations were found in children. Conclusions: Overweight and obesity were prevalent among children and adolescents in China. Reducing screen-based activities is a promising strategy to prevent unhealthy weight gain in Chinese children and adolescents, while it is necessary to consider the content and distinguish between educational and recreational screen use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Screen Time, Dietary Intake, and Obesity)
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