Dietary Intake of Phytochemicals, Gut Microbiota and Appetite Control

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 June 2024 | Viewed by 1524

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Queen’s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, 47 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ, UK
Interests: nutrition; stress; exercise; polyphenols; steroid hormones
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Guest Editor
Department of Applied Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK
Interests: polyphenols; nutraceuticals; healthy aging; cognitive function; chronic disease
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The multi-functional potential of natural products, particularly plant phytochemicals, includes optimising physiological functions, modulating immune responses and the gut microbiota, influencing epigenome activity, enhancing stress adaptation, and impacting body system pathophysiology. A prominent example is the probiotic and prebiotic activity of the major active constituent, phytochemicals, which modulate molecular pathways related to various health benefits including appetite control and which manipulate the gut–brain axis for the treatment of obesity, in addition to their antitumor and chemo-preventive activities. The growing interest in natural products is driven by consumer demands, industry advancements, and the increasing prevalence of non-communicable diseases in aging populations. As people seek safe and effective alternatives, the potential of natural products and functional foods in promoting health and wellness has gained momentum.

Functional foods and supplements have been found to reduce the risk of chronic diseases, such as coronary heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, obesity, neurodegenerative disorders, and some cancers. The pleiotropic effects of these polyphenols are evident regarding their role in redox modulation and inflammatory processes, molecular signalling, stem cell proliferation and differentiation, metabolism regulation, and hormonal imbalance, as well as their potential effects in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. The biological actions of diet and its active natural components have been mainly attributed to their multiple actions affecting various cellular and hormonal pathways. For example, the mechanisms by which natural products could exert their antihypertensive effect have shown a multiplicity of actions (e.g., increased NO production, inhibition of renin release and ACE activity, angiotensin receptor and calcium channel blockade, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, and opioid agonistic effects)

This Special Issue will collate recent high-quality research in the field of appetite regulation, the gut microbiota, and the probiotic actions of phytochemicals, focusing on the investigation of gut-related mechanisms in relation to functional foods, including gut hormones, gastrointestinal motility, gut–brain communication, and the roles of diet and the microbiome. Both original research articles and reviews (clinical and preclinical) as well as animal research work are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Emad Al-Dujaili
Dr. Catherine Tsang
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • diet
  • appetite
  • gut microbiome
  • gut hormones
  • obesity
  • diabetes
  • gut–brain communication

Published Papers (1 paper)

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26 pages, 2638 KiB  
Systematic Review
Effect of Polyphenol Supplementation on Memory Functioning in Overweight and Obese Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Sara Farag, Catherine Tsang, Emad A. S. Al-Dujaili and Philip N. Murphy
Nutrients 2024, 16(4), 474; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16040474 - 6 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1319
Abstract
Negative health consequences of obesity include impaired neuronal functioning and cell death, thus bringing the risk of impaired cognitive functioning. Antioxidant properties of polyphenols offer a possible intervention for overweight people, but evidence for their effectiveness in supporting cognitive functioning is mixed. This [...] Read more.
Negative health consequences of obesity include impaired neuronal functioning and cell death, thus bringing the risk of impaired cognitive functioning. Antioxidant properties of polyphenols offer a possible intervention for overweight people, but evidence for their effectiveness in supporting cognitive functioning is mixed. This review examined evidence from randomized controlled trials concerning the effect of polyphenols on tasks requiring either immediate or delayed retrieval of learned information, respectively, thus controlling for differences in cognitive processes and related neural substrates supporting respective task demands. Searches of the PubMed/Medline, PsycInfo, and Scopus databases identified 24 relevant primary studies with N = 2336 participants having a BMI ≥ 25.0 kg/m2. The participants’ mean age for the 24 studies exceeded 60 years. Respective meta-analyses produced a significant summary effect for immediate retrieval but not for delayed retrieval. The present findings support a potential positive effect of chronic supplementation with polyphenols, most notably flavonoids, on immediate retrieval in participants aged over 60 years with obesity being a risk factor for cognitive impairment. We recommend further investigation of this potential positive effect in participants with such risk factors. Future research on all populations should report the phenolic content of the supplementation administered and be specific regarding the cognitive processes tested. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Intake of Phytochemicals, Gut Microbiota and Appetite Control)
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