Impact on Human Health of Engineered Nanomaterials

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Biology and Medicines".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2020) | Viewed by 5698

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati, Italy
Interests: carbon nanotube; materials science & nanotechnology; multifunctional materials; nanocarbon; biomedical applications
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last several years, our knowledge of the impact of nanotechnological applications on human health has improved. The information that hence has become available about nanotechnology’s effects on health has been practically applied, in order to assess the risk connected to exposures to nanomaterials. The definition of nanomaterials in terms of size and structure, as well their corresponding chemical-physical characteristics and chemical properties; their genotoxic, oxidative, cytotoxic, respiratory, dermal, cardiovascular, and immunological effects; and their effects on the central nervous system, have been the subject of manifold investigations. Risk assessment and risk management, potential prevention and protection measures, and good practices have also been the focus of growing attention lately. Finally, methods for the bio degradation of nanomaterials have been considered, in the spirit of showing the potential of the immunitary system in handling the effect of nanomaterials on human health. In this Issue, attention will be paid to topics related to the impact of engineered nanomaterials on human health, including their genotoxic, oxidative, cytotoxic, respiratory, dermal, and cardiovascular and immunological effects; their effects on the central nervous system of engineered nanomaterials; risk assessment and risk management, potential prevention and protection measures, and good practices related to intentional or unintentional exposure to engineered nanomaterials; and methods for the bio degradation of engineered nanomaterials.

Prof. Dr. Stefano Bellucci
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • engineered nanomaterials
  • genotoxic effects
  • oxidative effects
  • cytotoxic effects: respiratory effects
  • dermal effects
  • cardiovascular effects
  • immunological effects
  • effects on the central nervous system
  • bio degradation
  • risk assessment and risk management from exposure to engineered nanomaterials
  • prevention and protection

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

22 pages, 5226 KiB  
Article
Resonant and Sensing Performance of Volume Waveguide Structures Based on Polymer Nanomaterials
by Tatiana Smirnova, Volodymyr Fitio, Oksana Sakhno, Pavel Yezhov, Andrii Bendziak, Volodymyr Hryn and Stefano Bellucci
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(11), 2114; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10112114 - 24 Oct 2020
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1986
Abstract
Organic–inorganic photocurable nanocomposite materials are a topic of intensive research nowadays. The wide variety of materials and flexibility of their characteristics provide more freedom to design optical elements for light and neutron optics and holographic sensors. We propose a new strategy of nanocomposite [...] Read more.
Organic–inorganic photocurable nanocomposite materials are a topic of intensive research nowadays. The wide variety of materials and flexibility of their characteristics provide more freedom to design optical elements for light and neutron optics and holographic sensors. We propose a new strategy of nanocomposite application for fabricating resonant waveguide structures (RWS), whose working principle is based on optical waveguide resonance. Due to their resonant properties, RWS can be used as active tunable filters, refractive index (RI) sensors, near-field enhancers for spectroscopy, non-linear optics, etc. Our original photocurable organic–inorganic nanocomposite was used as a material for RWS. Unlike known waveguide structures with corrugated surfaces, we investigated the waveguide gratings with the volume modulation of the RI fabricated by a holographic method that enables large-size structures with high homogeneity. In order to produce thin photosensitive waveguide layers for their subsequent holographic structuring, a special compression method was developed. The resonant and sensing properties of new resonant structures were experimentally examined. The volume waveguide gratings demonstrate narrow resonant peaks with a bandwidth less than 0.012 nm. The Q-factor exceeds 50,000. The sensor based on waveguide volume grating provides detection of a minimal RI change of 1 × 10−4 RIU. Here we also present the new theoretical model that is used for analysis and design of developed RWS. Based on the proposed model, fairly simple analytical relationships between the parameters characterizing the sensor were obtained. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact on Human Health of Engineered Nanomaterials)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 3933 KiB  
Article
Potential Role of Soluble Metal Impurities in the Acute Lung Inflammogenicity of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes
by Dong-Keun Lee, Soyeon Jeon, Jiyoung Jeong, Il Je Yu, Kyung Seuk Song, Aeyeon Kang, Wan Soo Yun, Jong Sung Kim and Wan-Seob Cho
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(2), 379; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10020379 - 21 Feb 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2945
Abstract
Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have variable metal impurities, but little is known about the impact of soluble metal impurities on the toxicity of MWCNTs. Here, we evaluated the role of soluble metal impurities to the acute inflammogenic potential of MWCNTs, using five types [...] Read more.
Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have variable metal impurities, but little is known about the impact of soluble metal impurities on the toxicity of MWCNTs. Here, we evaluated the role of soluble metal impurities to the acute inflammogenic potential of MWCNTs, using five types of high purity MWCNTs (>95%). MWCNTs and their soluble fractions collected at 24 h after incubation in phosphate-buffered saline showed diverse metal impurities with variable concentrations. The fiber-free soluble fractions produced variable levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the iron level was the key determinant for ROS production. The acute inflammation at 24 h after intratracheal instillation of MWCNTs to rats at 0.19, 0.63, and 1.91 mg MWCNT/kg body weight (bw) or fiber-free supernatants from MWCNT suspensions at 1.91 and 7.64 mg MWCNT/kg bw showed that the number of granulocytes, a marker for acute inflammation, was significantly increased with a good dose-dependency. The correlation study showed that neither the levels of iron nor the ROS generation potential of the soluble fractions showed any correlations with the inflammogenic potential. However, the total concentration of transition metals in the soluble fractions showed a good correlation with the acute lung inflammogenic potential. These results implied that metal impurities, especially transitional metals, can contribute to the acute inflammogenic potential of MWCNTs, although the major parameter for the toxicity of MWCNTs is size and shape. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact on Human Health of Engineered Nanomaterials)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop