Innovation of Nanotheranostics for Precise Diagnostics and Therapeutics of Diseases

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Biology and Medicines".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 6991

Special Issue Editor

School of Science, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen 518055, China
Interests: polymer chemistry; molecular imaging probes; nanomedicines; prodrugs; aggregation-induced emission; fluorescence imaging; photoacoustic imaging; microscopy; wide-field imaging; two photon imaging; second harmonic imaging
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nowadays, the development of nanotheranostics, which integrates diagnostics and therapeutics into a single nanoplatform, has been expedited in many preclinical and clinical scenarios. Nanotheranostics development depends on the innovation of nanomaterials and corresponding formulation technology. In this Special Issue, we aim to focus on the state-of-the-art nanomaterials for diagnostics (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging, fluorescence imaging, photoacoustic imaging, ultrasound imaging, computerized tomography, and positron emission tomography) and therapeutics (e.g., chemotherapy, immunotherapy, radiotherapy, surgery, sonodynamic therapy, chemodynamic therapy, and photodynamic therapy) for different life-threatening diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, inflammation, neurodegenerative diseases, and bone diseases. In addition, we plan to present nanotechnologies for the fabrication of theranostic medicine, which include microfluidics, nanoprecipitation, emulsion and solvent-evaporation, surface modification, exosome production, and biomimetic cellular membrane coating. Potential topics include, but are not limited to: biomimetic nanomedicines, image-guided drug delivery, theranostic nanomedicines for the treatment of bacterial infections, nanomaterials for synergistic imaging and therapy, nanotechnologies for theranostic nanomedicine production, nanomaterials for multimodal imaging, and nanomaterials for combinatory therapeutics and targeted therapy.

Dr. Bing Guo
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • theranostics
  • nanomedicines
  • imaging
  • therapy
  • active targeting
  • biomimetic nanomedicines

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Review

22 pages, 6290 KiB  
Review
Contrast Agents of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Future Perspective
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(13), 2003; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13132003 - 04 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1703
Abstract
In recent times, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a highly promising modality for diagnosing severe diseases. Its exceptional spatiotemporal resolution and ease of use have established it as an indispensable clinical diagnostic tool. Nevertheless, there are instances where MRI encounters challenges [...] Read more.
In recent times, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a highly promising modality for diagnosing severe diseases. Its exceptional spatiotemporal resolution and ease of use have established it as an indispensable clinical diagnostic tool. Nevertheless, there are instances where MRI encounters challenges related to low contrast, necessitating the use of contrast agents (CAs). Significant efforts have been made by scientists to enhance the precision of observing diseased body parts by leveraging the synergistic potential of MRI in conjunction with other imaging techniques and thereby modifying the CAs. In this work, our focus is on elucidating the rational designing approach of CAs and optimizing their compatibility for multimodal imaging and other intelligent applications. Additionally, we emphasize the importance of incorporating various artificial intelligence tools, such as machine learning and deep learning, to explore the future prospects of disease diagnosis using MRI. We also address the limitations associated with these techniques and propose reasonable remedies, with the aim of advancing MRI as a cutting-edge diagnostic tool for the future. Full article
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14 pages, 1709 KiB  
Review
MXenes in Cancer Nanotheranostics
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(19), 3360; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12193360 - 27 Sep 2022
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 2489
Abstract
MXenes encompass attractive properties such as a large surface area, unique chemical structures, stability, elastic mechanical strength, excellent electrical conductivity, hydrophilicity, and ease of surface functionalization/modifications, which make them one of the broadly explored two-dimensional materials in the world. MXene-based micro- and nanocomposites/systems [...] Read more.
MXenes encompass attractive properties such as a large surface area, unique chemical structures, stability, elastic mechanical strength, excellent electrical conductivity, hydrophilicity, and ease of surface functionalization/modifications, which make them one of the broadly explored two-dimensional materials in the world. MXene-based micro- and nanocomposites/systems with special optical, mechanical, electronic, and excellent targeting/selectivity features have been explored for cancer nanotheranostics. These materials exhibit great diagnostic and therapeutic potential and offer opportunities for cancer photoacoustic imaging along with photodynamic and photothermal therapy. They can be applied to targeted anticancer drug delivery while being deployed for the imaging/diagnosis of tumors/cancers and malignancies. MXene-based systems functionalized with suitable biocompatible or bioactive agents have suitable cellular uptake features with transferring potential from vascular endothelial cells and specific localization, high stability, and auto-fluorescence benefits at different emission–excitation wavelengths, permitting post-transport examination and tracking. The surface engineering of MXenes can improve their biocompatibility, targeting, bioavailability, and biodegradability along with their optical, mechanical, and electrochemical features to develop multifunctional systems with cancer theranostic applications. However, challenges still persist in terms of their environmentally benign fabrication, up-scalability, functionality improvement, optimization conditions, surface functionalization, biocompatibility, biodegradability, clinical translational studies, and pharmacokinetics. This manuscript delineates the recent advancements, opportunities, and important challenges pertaining to the cancer nanotheranostic potential of MXenes and their derivatives. Full article
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40 pages, 9613 KiB  
Review
Microenvironmental Behaviour of Nanotheranostic Systems for Controlled Oxidative Stress and Cancer Treatment
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(14), 2462; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12142462 - 18 Jul 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2111
Abstract
The development of smart, efficient and multifunctional material systems for diseases treatment are imperative to meet current and future health challenges. Nanomaterials with theranostic properties have offered a cost effective and efficient solution for disease treatment, particularly, metal/oxide based nanotheranostic systems already offering [...] Read more.
The development of smart, efficient and multifunctional material systems for diseases treatment are imperative to meet current and future health challenges. Nanomaterials with theranostic properties have offered a cost effective and efficient solution for disease treatment, particularly, metal/oxide based nanotheranostic systems already offering therapeutic and imaging capabilities for cancer treatment. Nanoparticles can selectively generate/scavenge ROS through intrinsic or external stimuli to augment/diminish oxidative stress. An efficient treatment requires higher oxidative stress/toxicity in malignant disease, with a minimal level in surrounding normal cells. The size, shape and surface properties of nanoparticles are critical parameters for achieving a theranostic function in the microenvironment. In the last decade, different strategies for the synthesis of biocompatible theranostic nanostructures have been introduced. The exhibition of therapeutics properties such as selective reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging, hyperthermia, antibacterial, antiviral, and imaging capabilities such as MRI, CT and fluorescence activity have been reported in a variety of developed nanosystems to combat cancer, neurodegenerative and emerging infectious diseases. In this review article, theranostic in vitro behaviour in relation to the size, shape and synthesis methods of widely researched and developed nanosystems (Au, Ag, MnOx, iron oxide, maghemite quantum flakes, La2O3−x, TaOx, cerium nanodots, ITO, MgO1−x) are presented. In particular, ROS-based properties of the nanostructures in the microenvironment for cancer therapy are discussed. The provided overview of the biological behaviour of reported metal-based nanostructures will help to conceptualise novel designs and synthesis strategies for the development of advanced nanotheranostic systems. Full article
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