Advanced Nanomaterials for Water Remediation

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Nanoscience and Nanotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 July 2023) | Viewed by 2004

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
1. Centre of Molecular and Environmental Biology (CBMA), Department of Biology, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal
2. Institute of Science and Innovation for Bio-Sustainability (IB-S), University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal
Interests: nanoecotoxicology; eco-physiology of aquatic fungi; freshwater ecology; microbiology; aqautic pollution; nanoparticles; mircoplastics

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Centre of Molecular and Environmental Biology (CBMA), Department of Biology, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal
2. IB-S–Institute of Research and Innovation on Bio-Sustainability, University of Minho, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal
Interests: nanoparticles synthesis; nanocomposites; membranes; photocatalysis; adsorption; water remediation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Universidade de Vigo, 36310 Vigo, Spain
Interests: nanoparticles; green synthesis; biological activity
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Water contamination is one of the most critical environmental crises and one of humankind’s most considerable challenges. The World Health Organisation estimates that approximately 800,000 people die yearly from contaminated water consumption. The most pressing issues result from the increasing use of persistent contaminants in anthropogenic activities that endanger aquatic organisms and humans and the obsolescence of traditional water and wastewater treatment plants against these contaminants. Thus, to overcome this deficiency, it is imperative to develop nanomaterials (e.g., nanoparticles, nanotubes, and metallic organic frameworks) that can be used in water and wastewater remediation due to their unique physical–chemical properties, such as large surface area. Catalytic, photocatalytic, and adsorptive nanomaterials have been widely employed to remove contaminants efficiently. In the scope of sustainability, special attention is paid to novel green synthesis routes that yield non-toxic nanomaterials.

A thorough investigation is also vital concerning nanomaterials’ ecotoxicity, for determining if the produced materials are harmful to aquatic organisms and understanding how they affect ecosystems, food chains, and the putative bioaccumulation process.

This Special Issue will focus on, but is not limited to, the following items:

  • Novel synthesis, characterisation, and application of nanomaterials in water/wastewater remediation processes.
  • Green or sustainable synthesis routes of materials for water/wastewater remediation.
  • All types of nanomaterials and nanocomposites for water/wastewater remediation.
  • Multifunctional nanomaterials (e.g., antimicrobial/antifouling) for water remediation.
  • Ecotoxicity assessment of all types of nanomaterials.

Prof. Dr. Fernanda Cássio
Dr. Pedro Manuel Martins
Prof. Dr. María Carmen Rodríguez-Argüelles
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • photocatalytic nanoparticles, nanosorbents
  • ecotoxicity
  • eco-physiology
  • sustainability

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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25 pages, 6701 KiB  
Article
Development and Upscaling of SiO2@TiO2 Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Methylene Blue Removal
by Bárbara R. Gomes, Joana L. Lopes, Lorena Coelho, Mattia Ligonzo, Monica Rigoletto, Giuliana Magnacca and Francesca Deganello
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(16), 2276; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13162276 - 8 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1451
Abstract
SiO2@TiO2 core-shell nanoparticles were successfully synthesized via a simple, reproducible, and low-cost method and tested for methylene blue adsorption and UV photodegradation, with a view to their application in wastewater treatment. The monodisperse SiO2 core was obtained by the [...] Read more.
SiO2@TiO2 core-shell nanoparticles were successfully synthesized via a simple, reproducible, and low-cost method and tested for methylene blue adsorption and UV photodegradation, with a view to their application in wastewater treatment. The monodisperse SiO2 core was obtained by the classical Stöber method and then coated with a thin layer of TiO2, followed by calcination or hydrothermal treatments. The properties of SiO2@TiO2 core-shell NPs resulted from the synergy between the photocatalytic properties of TiO2 and the adsorptive properties of SiO2. The synthesized NPs were characterized using FT-IR spectroscopy, HR-TEM, FE–SEM, and EDS. Zeta potential, specific surface area, and porosity were also determined. The results show that the synthesized SiO2@TiO2 NPs that are hydrothermally treated have similar behaviors and properties regardless of the hydrothermal treatment type and synthesis scale and better performance compared to the SiO2@TiO2 calcined and TiO2 reference samples. The generation of reactive species was determined by EPR, and the photocatalytic activity was evaluated by the methylene blue (MB) removal in aqueous solution under UV light. Hydrothermally treated SiO2@TiO2 showed the highest adsorption capacity and photocatalytic removal of almost 100% of MB after 15 min in UV light, 55 and 89% higher compared to SiO2 and TiO2 reference samples, respectively, while the SiO2@TiO2 calcined sample showed 80%. It was also observed that the SiO2-containing samples showed a considerable adsorption capacity compared to the TiO2 reference sample, which improved the MB removal. These results demonstrate the efficient synergy effect between SiO2 and TiO2, which enhances both the adsorption and photocatalytic properties of the nanomaterial. A possible photocatalytic mechanism was also proposed. Also noteworthy is that the performance of the upscaled HT1 sample was similar to one of the lab-scale synthesized samples, demonstrating the potentiality of this synthesis methodology in producing candidate nanomaterials for the removal of contaminants from wastewater. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanomaterials for Water Remediation)
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Review

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19 pages, 1298 KiB  
Review
nZVI-Based Nanomaterials Used for Phosphate Removal from Aquatic Systems
by Jonathan Suazo-Hernández, Pamela Sepúlveda, Lizethly Cáceres-Jensen, Jorge Castro-Rojas, Patricia Poblete-Grant, Nanthi Bolan and María de la Luz Mora
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(3), 399; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13030399 - 18 Jan 2023
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1836
Abstract
In the last decade, the application of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) has garnered great attention as an adsorbent due to its low cost, non-toxicity, high porosity, and BET-specific surface area. In particular, the immobilization of nZVI particles onto inorganic and organic substrates (nanocomposites) [...] Read more.
In the last decade, the application of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) has garnered great attention as an adsorbent due to its low cost, non-toxicity, high porosity, and BET-specific surface area. In particular, the immobilization of nZVI particles onto inorganic and organic substrates (nanocomposites) decreased its agglomeration, allowing them to be effective and achieve greater adsorption of pollutants than pristine nanoparticles (NPs). Although nZVI began to be used around 2004 to remove pollutants, there are no comprehensive review studies about phosphate removal from aquatic systems to date. For this reason, this study will show different types of nZVI, pristine nZVI, and its nanocomposites, that exist on the market, how factors such as pH solution, oxygen, temperature, doses of adsorbent, initial phosphate concentration, and interferents affect phosphate adsorption capacity, and mechanisms involved in phosphate removal. We determined that nanocomposites did not always have higher phosphate adsorption than pristine nZVI particles. Moreover, phosphate can be removed by nZVI-based nanoadsorbents through electrostatic attraction, ion exchange, chemisorption, reduction, complexation, hydrogen bonding, and precipitation mechanisms. Using the partition coefficient (PC) values, we found that sepiolite-nZVI is the most effective nanoadsorbent that exists to remove phosphate from aqueous systems. We suggest future studies need to quantify the PC values for nZVI-based nanoadsorbents as well as ought to investigate their phosphate removal efficiency under natural environmental conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nanomaterials for Water Remediation)
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