Nanomaterials for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy and Catalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 October 2024 | Viewed by 2063

Special Issue Editors

State Key Laboratory of Vanadium and Titanium Resources Comprehensive Utilization, ANSTEEL Research Institute, Chengdu, China
Interests: nanomaterials; energy storage and conversion

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Guest Editor
College of Polymer Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China
Interests: self-assembly; controlled polymerization; functional hydrogels

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lithium–sulfur batteries (Li-S batteries, LSBs) are among the most promising energy storage systems, possessing desirable qualities such as high energy density and environmental friendliness; however, the poor conductivity of sulfur cathodes and the shuttle effect of polysulfides hamper their further practical application. Fortunately, with the emergence of various innovative technologies, as well as new insights into the related mechanisms to address these critical issues and the tremendous passion for improving lithium metal anodes, rechargeable Li-S batteries have gained another "renaissance" in the last decade. For this guest-edited Special Issue, we welcome the submission of reviews, articles (original research), communications, and perspectives that explore topics including, but not limited to, the following: recent developments in Li-S batteries; the role of nanomaterials in cathodes, anodes, binders, electrolytes, interlayers and separators; the relevant mechanisms; and the rational design/fabrication of nanostructured composite materials and the electrodes/devices thereof (e.g., flexible, wearable, self-healable, 3D-printed batteries, microbatteries, or integrated batteries).

The present Special Issue of Nanomaterials aims to present the current state of the art in the utilization of nanomaterials (or nanostructured materials/components) in Li-S batteries, a field that has been revitalized since the late 2000s, with seminal discoveries regarding specific conductive matrices, sulfur redox electrocatalysts, selective adsorption/desorption, functional modification of separators, the incorporation of interlayers, rational design of cell modules, and relevant theoretical modeling. Nanomaterials, possessing a range of essential functions, have played and will continue to play a vital role in the development of high-performance Li-S batteries and their practical application. For the present Special Issue, we invite contributions from reputable groups with the aim of providing a fresh and balanced view of the current state of the art in this popular discipline.

Dr. Wei Ni
Dr. Lingying Shi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • lithium–sulfur batteries
  • Li-S batteries
  • nanomaterials
  • nanostructures
  • electrodes
  • electrolytes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 4189 KiB  
Article
Multifunctional Vanadium Nitride-Modified Separator for High-Performance Lithium–Sulfur Batteries
by Sen Liu, Yang Liu, Xu Zhang, Maoqiang Shen, Xuesen Liu, Xinyue Gao, Linrui Hou and Changzhou Yuan
Nanomaterials 2024, 14(8), 656; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano14080656 - 10 Apr 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 645
Abstract
Lithium–sulfur batteries (LSBs) are recognized as among the best potential alternative battery systems to lithium-ion batteries and have been widely investigated. However, the shuttle effect has severely restricted the advancement in their practical applications. Here, we prepare vanadium nitride (VN) nanoparticles grown in [...] Read more.
Lithium–sulfur batteries (LSBs) are recognized as among the best potential alternative battery systems to lithium-ion batteries and have been widely investigated. However, the shuttle effect has severely restricted the advancement in their practical applications. Here, we prepare vanadium nitride (VN) nanoparticles grown in situ on a nitrogen-doped carbon skeleton (denoted as VN@NC) derived from the MAX phase and use it as separator modification materials for LSBs to suppress the shuttle effect and optimize electrochemical performance. Thanks to the outstanding catalytic performance of VN and the superior electrical conductivity of carbon skeleton derived from MAX, the synergistic effect between the two accelerates the kinetics of both lithium polysulfides (LiPSs) to Li2S and the reverse reaction, effectively suppresses the shuttle effect, and increases cathode sulfur availability, significantly enhancing the electrochemical performance of LSBs. LSBs constructed with VN@NC-modified separators achieve outstanding rate performance and cycle stability. With a capacity of 560 mAh g−1 at 4 C, it exhibits enhanced structural and chemical stability. At 1 C, the device has an incipient capacity of 1052.4 mAh g−1, and the degradation rate averaged only 0.085% over 400cycles. Meanwhile, the LSBs also show larger capacities and good cycling stability at a low electrolyte/sulfur ratio and high surface-loaded sulfur conditions. Thus, a facile and efficient way of preparing modified materials for separators is provided to realize high-performance LSBs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries)
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12 pages, 4375 KiB  
Article
Porous Carbon Interlayer Derived from Traditional Korean Paper for Li–S Batteries
by Yunju Choi, Hyungil Jang, Jong-Pil Kim, Jaeyeong Lee, Euh Duck Jeong, Jong-Seong Bae and Heon-Cheol Shin
Nanomaterials 2024, 14(4), 385; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano14040385 - 19 Feb 2024
Viewed by 982
Abstract
A carbonized interlayer effectively helps to improve the electrochemical performance of lithium–sulfur (Li–S) batteries. In this study, a simple and inexpensive carbon intermediate layer was fabricated using a traditional Korean paper called “hanji”. This carbon interlayer has a fibrous porous structure, with a [...] Read more.
A carbonized interlayer effectively helps to improve the electrochemical performance of lithium–sulfur (Li–S) batteries. In this study, a simple and inexpensive carbon intermediate layer was fabricated using a traditional Korean paper called “hanji”. This carbon interlayer has a fibrous porous structure, with a specific surface area of 91.82 m2 g−1 and a BJH adsorption average pore diameter of 26.63 nm. The prepared carbon interlayer was utilized as an intermediary layer in Li–S batteries to decrease the charge-transfer resistance and capture dissolved lithium polysulfides. The porous fiber-shaped carbon interlayer suppressed the migration of polysulfides produced during the electrochemical process. The carbon interlayer facilitates the adsorption of soluble lithium polysulfides, allowing for their re-utilization in subsequent cycles. Additionally, the carbon interlayer significantly reduces the polarization of the cell. This simple strategy results in a significant improvement in cycle performance. Consequently, the discharge capacity at 0.5 C after 150 cycles was confirmed to have improved by more than twofold, reaching 230 mAh g−1 for cells without the interlayer and 583 mAh g−1 for cells with the interlayer. This study demonstrates a simple method for improving the capacity of Li–S batteries by integrating a functional carbon interlayer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries)
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