The Interaction of Electron Phenomena on the Mesoscopic Scale

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Chemistry at Nanoscale".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 December 2024 | Viewed by 1662

Special Issue Editors

School of Physics, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing, China
Interests: dielectric physics and condensed matter physics

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Guest Editor
College of Materials Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Technology, Guilin, China
Interests: materials science

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

“More is different”. Interacting electrons on the mesoscopic scale present emerging phenomena of multi-body systems in condensed matters. The Special Issue covers cutting-edge studies on the mechanics, thermology, optics, electricity, and magnetism of nanomaterials. These studies include not only novel phenomena in new nanomaterials but also fundamental phenomena in the “old” ones.

We hope that the Special Issue will shed light on the theoretical limitations of weak, medium, and strong interactions among electrons, and, importantly, provide insights on the future development of material synthesis methods, structural and property characterizations, and scientific strategies.

Dr. Kai Chen
Prof. Dr. Laijun Liu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • nanomaterial
  • interacting electron phenomena
  • mechanics
  • thermology
  • optics
  • electricity
  • magnetism

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 3799 KiB  
Article
Optimize Electron Beam Energy toward In Situ Imaging of Thick Frozen Bio-Samples with Nanometer Resolution Using MeV-STEM
by Xi Yang, Liguo Wang, Victor Smaluk and Timur Shaftan
Nanomaterials 2024, 14(9), 803; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano14090803 - 5 May 2024
Viewed by 663
Abstract
To optimize electron energy for in situ imaging of large biological samples up to 10 μm in thickness with nanoscale resolutions, we implemented an analytical model based on elastic and inelastic characteristic angles. This model has been benchmarked by Monte Carlo simulations and [...] Read more.
To optimize electron energy for in situ imaging of large biological samples up to 10 μm in thickness with nanoscale resolutions, we implemented an analytical model based on elastic and inelastic characteristic angles. This model has been benchmarked by Monte Carlo simulations and can be used to predict the transverse beam size broadening as a function of electron energy while the probe beam traverses through the sample. As a result, the optimal choice of the electron beam energy can be realized. In addition, the impact of the dose-limited resolution was analysed. While the sample thickness is less than 10 μm, there exists an optimal electron beam energy below 10 MeV regarding a specific sample thickness. However, for samples thicker than 10 μm, the optimal beam energy is 10 MeV or higher depending on the sample thickness, and the ultimate resolution could become worse with the increase in the sample thickness. Moreover, a MeV-STEM column based on a two-stage lens system can be applied to reduce the beam size from one micron at aperture to one nanometre at the sample with the energy tuning range from 3 to 10 MeV. In conjunction with the state-of-the-art ultralow emittance electron source that we recently implemented, the maximum size of an electron beam when it traverses through an up to 10 μm thick bio-sample can be kept less than 10 nm. This is a critical step toward the in situ imaging of large, thick biological samples with nanometer resolution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Interaction of Electron Phenomena on the Mesoscopic Scale)
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11 pages, 2028 KiB  
Article
Large Polaron Condensation in a Pseudo-Bilayer Quantum Hall Composite
by Bo Dai, Changyue Wang, Junhao Chen, Xin Su, Yuning Shi, Yihan Zeng, Ying Wang and Kai Chen
Nanomaterials 2024, 14(8), 688; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano14080688 - 16 Apr 2024
Viewed by 587
Abstract
There is much interest regarding the “coupled ferroelectricity and superconductivity” in the two-dimensional material, bilayer Td-MoTe2; however, the value and the type of electric polarization are unknown. The device structure and the measurement method show that the measured material [...] Read more.
There is much interest regarding the “coupled ferroelectricity and superconductivity” in the two-dimensional material, bilayer Td-MoTe2; however, the value and the type of electric polarization are unknown. The device structure and the measurement method show that the measured material is the composite of the pseudo-bilayer quantum Hall system, with a thickness of about thirty-six nanometers. The derived dielectric hysteresis loops and the calculated electronic structure reveal that the condensed large polarons are responsible for the reverse ferroelectricity and the coupled superconductivity. The maximum value of polaron-type electric polarization is ~12 nC/μm2 or 1.2 × 104 μc/cm2. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Interaction of Electron Phenomena on the Mesoscopic Scale)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Spherical Lithium-Ion Battery Electrodes with Encapsulated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for High-Power Applications
Authors: Aleksander Babkin, Oleg Drozhzhin, Evgeny Antipov, Vladimir Sergeyev
Affiliation: Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry
Abstract: In this paper, we present an innovative approach to address this issue by encapsulating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) within the volume of LFP particles using a spray drying process. This process involves the introduction of CNTs into the liquid phase of LFP during sputtering, creating a composite material with improved electrical conductivity. The resulting electrodes exhibit excellent volumetric conductivity due to the carbon nanotube framework, and demonstrate high discharge capacity even at high charge/discharge current densities: the spherical LFP particles retain more than 75% of their theoretical discharge capacity at a current density of 10C. Additionally, the resulting composite cathode material exhibits low charge transfer resistance and excellent stability in cyclic performance. The data obtained significantly expands the potential applications for safe LFP-based cathode materials in the electric vehicle industry, as encapsulating carbon nanotubes within the volume of spherical particles leads to a significant improvement in electrical conductivity and specific discharge capacity.

Title: Random Sequential Adsorption and Percolation on Discrete Substrates
Authors: Dijana Dujak1, Ljuba Budinski-Petković2 and Ivana Lončarević2,
Affiliation: 1 Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Sarajevo, 72000 Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina; 2 Faculty of Technical Sciences, University of Novi Sad, 21000 Novi Sad, Serbia;
Abstract: Random sequential adsorption (RSA) is a broadly used model for irreversible deposition on substrates. Over the last decades a huge number of works have been published concerning this topic. Here we give a brief review of the results for irreversible deposition on two-dimensional discrete substrates. Depositing objects randomly and sequentially adsorbed onto the substrate and they are not allowed to overlap, so the jamming coverage θjam is less than in close packing. Kinetics of the process is described by the time-dependence of the coverage fraction θ(t) and for the discrete substrates this dependence was found to be of the form: θ(t) = θjam − Ae−t/σ. Another topic of interest is the percolation of the deposit that can occur at a certain coverage. The coverage of the surface is increased through the RSA process up to the percolation threshold, when a cluster that extends through the whole system appears. A percolating cluster arises in the system when the opposite edges of the system are connected via some path of nearest neighbor sites occupied by the particles. Studying percolation is of great interest due to its relevance to conductivity in composite materials, flow through porous media, polymerization, the properties of nanomaterials, etc.

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