Functionalized Carbon-Based Nanomaterials for Emerging Applications in Optoelectronics, Clean Energy, and Environmental Monitoring

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "2D and Carbon Nanomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 March 2024) | Viewed by 3934

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
“Coriolan Dragulescu” Institute of Chemistry, 24 Mihai Viteazu Ave., 300223 Timisoara, Romania
Interests: organic chemistry; porphyrins; metalloporphyrins; colloid chemistry; material chemistry; sol-gel processes; nanomaterials; silica matrices; hybrid nanomaterials; aggregates; sensors; electrochemical mediators; catalysts; corrosion inhibitors; adsorbents
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Institute for Research and Development in Electrochemistry and Condensed Matter, Plautius Andronescu Street 1, 300224 Timisoara, Romania
Interests: pseudo-binary oxides; corrosion measurements; AFM microscopy; luminescence properties; optical properties; hydrothermal method; solid-state method; undoped and doped oxide nanomaterials

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center of Organic Chemistry "C.D. Nenitescu" of Romanian Academy, Splaiul Independenței 202B, Bucharest, Romania
Interests: density functional theory; computational chemistry; electrocatalysis; carbon electrochemistry; oxygen reduction reaction; water splitting

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Nano-SAE Research Centre, University of Bucharest, Atomistilor 405, 077125 Magurele, Romania
Interests: carbon materials for energy and environmental applications; semiconductor electrochemistry; electrochemical stability of nanomaterials; circular economy approaches for precious metals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to their remarkable chemical stability and suitable electrical properties, functionalized carbon materials with different inorganic/organic moieties are required materials for emerging applications. This is especially true in the generation of hydrogen via electrocatalytic water splitting, overcoming the performance of fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, graphene or carbon dots alone. Among these, heteroatom (e.g., nitrogen)-doped carbon nanomaterials are efficient electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reactions (HERs). It is now known that the carbons in vicinity of nitrogen atoms (although not those directly linked to nitrogen) promote the HER most actively. On the other hand, binary metal-oxide-based catalysts have been proven to be more effective for water splitting catalyzed reactions than their single metal oxide counterparts for both oxygen evolution reactions (OERs) and HERs. In addition, the combination of carbon-based materials and binary oxides to make composite nanostructures is interesting not only because they display the individual properties of both components, but they also exhibit synergistic properties that are advantageous for both water-splitting catalysis (photoanode materials) and gas sensing applications. This Special Issue also covers applications in optoelectronic field/field emission displays, because undoped and doped oxide nanomaterials have strong luminescence, thermo-stability, and thermo-responsive emission properties. According to the successful results that have been obtained, oxide-carbon-based complexes are much stronger adsorbents than carbon materials in gas adsorption (the charge transfers to the NO2 and CO gas molecules from these complexes are much more significant compared to those from carbon materials). Finally, synergistic effects between porphyrins (as versatile organic macrocycles) and carbon-based materials are offering the best molecular electrocatalysts with regard to oxygen reduction reactions (ORRs) yet reported, and are also acting as high-performance gas sensors. Metalloporphyrins have been shown to be an exceptionally efficient supported homogeneous catalysts for the reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) to CO in water once inserted in a flow cell. As a notable result, electronics fabricated from organic materials are much less toxic, easier to recycle, and scalable. This Special Issue also invites papers that envisage advances in methods and technologies used to realize porous multicomponent surface layers consisting of bimetallic oxide nanoparticles/porphyrins and carbon nanomaterials. Special attention will be dedicated to computational chemistry techniques employing density functional theory (DFT) to achieve a fundamental understanding of the relationships between structure, morphology and (electro)catalytic, sensing and luminescence properties of these composites. Usually, the revised Perdew–Burke–Ernzerhof functional is used for DFT calculations. Reactions involving a concerted proton-electron transfer will lead to surface intermediates. DFT has been proven successful in calculating and using the free energy of adsorption of reaction intermediates to determine the efficiency of electrocatalysts for reactions such as the oxygen evolution reaction. A constant energy difference between different key reaction intermediates will lead to scaling relationships which can be used to discover electrocatalytically active materials.

Dr. Eugenia Fagadar-Cosma
Dr. Mihaela Birdeanu
Dr. Isabela Costinela Man
Dr. Serban Stamatin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • carbon nanomaterials covered in this issue include: graphene, multi-walled nanotubes (MWCNTs), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), graphene quantum dots, nanodiamonds, carbon nanofibers, carbon nitride and fullerenes
  • doped and undoped binary oxides
  • macrocyclic compounds (porphyrin derivatives and corroles)
  • optical and luminescent properties
  • metal-free carbon–nitrogen (N–C) composites
  • transition-metal-incorporated carbon–nitrogen matrices
  • cathode catalyzed membrane with porphyrins and carbon powder for ORR
  • doped carbon xerogels functionalized with binary transition metal oxides for electrochemical activity for ORR
  • oxygen reduction reaction mechanism and kinetics for fuel cell technologies
  • binary oxides (Co–Ni, Sn-Co, Fe-Co)/carbon materials as supercapacitor electrode materials
  • binary metal oxide electrocatalysts for efficient overall water splitting
  • electrocatalytic water splitting
  • density functional theory

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

13 pages, 3715 KiB  
Article
A Conductive Microcavity Created by Assembly of Carbon Nanotube Buckypapers for Developing Electrochemically Wired Enzyme Cascades
by Itthipon Jeerapan, Yannig Nedellec and Serge Cosnier
Nanomaterials 2024, 14(6), 545; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano14060545 - 20 Mar 2024
Viewed by 922
Abstract
We describe the creation of a conductive microcavity based on the assembly of two pieces of carbon nanotube buckypaper for the entrapment of two enzymes, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOx), as well as a redox mediator: 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid diammonium salt (ABTS). [...] Read more.
We describe the creation of a conductive microcavity based on the assembly of two pieces of carbon nanotube buckypaper for the entrapment of two enzymes, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOx), as well as a redox mediator: 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid diammonium salt (ABTS). The hollow electrode, employing GOx, HRP, and the mediator, as an electrochemical enzyme cascade model, is utilized for glucose sensing at a potential of 50 mV vs. Ag/AgCl. This bienzyme electrode demonstrates the ability to oxidize glucose by GOx and subsequently convert H2O2 to water via the electrical wiring of HRP by ABTS. Different redox mediators (ABTS, potassium hexacyanoferrate (III), and hydroquinone) are tested for HRP wiring, with ABTS being the best candidate for the electroenzymatic reduction of H2O2. To demonstrate the possibility to optimize the enzyme cascade configuration, the enzyme ratio is studied with 1 mg HRP combined with variable amounts of GOx (1–4 mg) and 2 mg GOx combined with variable amounts of HRP (0.5–2 mg). The bienzyme electrode shows continuous operational stability for over a week and an excellent storage stability in phosphate buffer, with a decay of catalytic current by only 29% for 1 mM glucose after 100 days. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 2908 KiB  
Article
MWCNTs Decorated with TiO2 as Highly Performing Filler in the Preparation of Nanocomposite Membranes for Scalable Photocatalytic Degradation of Bisphenol A in Water
by Antonio Tursi, Amerigo Beneduci, Isabella Nicotera and Cataldo Simari
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(16), 2325; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13162325 - 13 Aug 2023
Viewed by 933
Abstract
Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine-disrupting compound with estrogenic behavior, is of great concern within the scientific community due to its high production levels and increasing concentration in various surface aquifers. While several materials exhibit excellent capacity for the photocatalytic degradation of BPA, their [...] Read more.
Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine-disrupting compound with estrogenic behavior, is of great concern within the scientific community due to its high production levels and increasing concentration in various surface aquifers. While several materials exhibit excellent capacity for the photocatalytic degradation of BPA, their powdered nature and poor chemical stability render them unsuitable for practical application in large-scale water decontamination. In this study, a new class of nanocomposite membranes based on sulfonated polyethersulfone (sPES) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes decorated with TiO2 nanoparticles (MWCNTs-TiO2) were investigated as efficient and scalable photocatalysts for the photodegradation of BPA in aqueous solutions. The MWCNTs-TiO2 hybrid material was prepared through a facile and inexpensive hydrothermal method and extensively characterized by XRD, Raman, FTIR, BET, and TGA. Meanwhile, nanocomposite membranes at different filler loadings were prepared by a simple casting procedure. Swelling tests and PFG NMR analyses provided insights into the impact of filler introduction on membrane hydrophilicity and water molecular dynamics, whereas the effectiveness of the various photocatalysts in BPA removal was monitored using HPLC. Among the different MWCNTs-TiO2 content nanocomposites, the one at 10 wt% loading (sP-MT10) showed the best photoactivity. Under UV irradiation at 254 nm and 365 nm for 240 min, photocatalytic oxidation of 5 mg/L bisphenol A by sP-MT10 resulted in 91% and 82% degradation, respectively. Both the effect of BPA concentration and the membrane regenerability were evaluated, revealing that the sP-MT10 maintained its maximum BPA removal capability over more than 10 cycles. Our findings indicate that sP-MT nanocomposite membranes are versatile, scalable, efficient, and highly reusable photocatalysts for the degradation of BPA, as well as potentially for other endocrine disruptors. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

14 pages, 1974 KiB  
Article
Polymeric Carbon Nitrides for Photoelectrochemical Applications: Ring Opening-Induced Degradation
by Florentina Iuliana Maxim, Eugenia Tanasa, Bogdan Mitrea, Cornelia Diac, Tomáš Skála, Liviu Cristian Tanase, Cătălin Ianăși, Adrian Ciocanea, Stefan Antohe, Eugeniu Vasile, Eugenia Fagadar-Cosma and Serban N. Stamatin
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(7), 1248; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13071248 - 31 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1298
Abstract
Active and stable materials that utilize solar radiation for promoting different reactions are critical for emerging technologies. Two of the most common polymeric carbon nitrides were prepared by the thermal polycondensation of melamine. The scope of this work is to investigate possible structural [...] Read more.
Active and stable materials that utilize solar radiation for promoting different reactions are critical for emerging technologies. Two of the most common polymeric carbon nitrides were prepared by the thermal polycondensation of melamine. The scope of this work is to investigate possible structural degradation before and after photoelectrochemical testing. The materials were characterized using synchrotron radiation and lab-based techniques, and subsequently degraded photoelectrochemically, followed by post-mortem analysis. Post-mortem investigations reveal: (1) carbon atoms bonded to three nitrogen atoms change into carbon atoms bonded to two nitrogen atoms and (2) the presence of methylene terminals in post-mortem materials. The study concludes that polymeric carbon nitrides are susceptible to photoelectrochemical degradation via ring opening. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop