Novel Low-Dimensional Materials and Heterostructures for Nanoelectronics and Spintronics Application

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanoelectronics, Nanosensors and Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2023) | Viewed by 2019

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Digital Material Science, National University of Science and Technology MISIS, Moscow, Russia
Interests: ab initio calculations; 2D and 1D materials; nanoelectronics; spintronics; superhard materials
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Guest Editor Assistant
Laboratory of Digital Material Science, National University of Science and Technology MISIS, Moscow, Russia
Interests: ab initio calculations; spintronics; nanoelectronics; 2D and 1D materials; carbon materials; half-metals; transition metals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent decades, extensive research on low-dimensional materials has led to a breakthrough in both their fundamental material science and their practical applications. Thin films, monolayers and multiple heterostructures based on low-dimensional materials are often found to possess unique physical properties compared to their bulk counterparts. In particular, their electronic, magnetic, transport and optical properties are highly relevant to nanoelectronics, spintronics, photovoltaics and related areas, and novel applications in areas such as fast memory processing, energy storage, flexible nanodevices and quantum computers have been suggested.

At the same time, the real application of nanomaterials requires an understanding of aspects such as their physical and chemical stability, their interfacial effects and effective property tuning methods. Thus, there is a need for further advanced experimental works and detailed theoretical studies that propose, synthesize and employ nanomaterials in controlled manner.

The main goal of this Special Issue is to highlight current progress in the study of low-dimensional materials and heterostructures, with a focus on their contribution to nanoelectronics, spintronics and related fields.

Prof. Dr. Pavel Sorokin
Guest Editors

Dr. Konstantin V. Larionov
Guest Editor Assistant

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Keywords

  • nanoelectronics
  • spintronics
  • optoelectronics
  • 2D materials
  • 1D materials
  • heterostructures
  • electronic properties
  • magnetic properties
  • transport properties

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 6170 KiB  
Article
Two-Dimensional MXene as a Promising Adsorbent for Trihalomethanes Removal: A Density-Functional Theory Study
by Islam Gomaa, Nasser Mohammed Hosny, Hanan Elhaes, Hend A. Ezzat, Maryam G. Elmahgary and Medhat A. Ibrahim
Nanomaterials 2024, 14(5), 454; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano14050454 - 29 Feb 2024
Viewed by 831
Abstract
This groundbreaking research delves into the intricate molecular interactions between MXene and trihalomethanes (THs) through a comprehensive theoretical study employing density-functional theory (DFT). Trihalomethanes are common carcinogenic chlorination byproducts found in water sanitation systems. This study focuses on a pristine MXene [Mn+1 [...] Read more.
This groundbreaking research delves into the intricate molecular interactions between MXene and trihalomethanes (THs) through a comprehensive theoretical study employing density-functional theory (DFT). Trihalomethanes are common carcinogenic chlorination byproducts found in water sanitation systems. This study focuses on a pristine MXene [Mn+1·Xn] monolayer and its various terminal [Tx] functional groups [Mn+1·XnTx], strategically placed on the surface for enhanced performance. Our investigation involves a detailed analysis of the adsorption energies of THs on different MXene types, with the MXene-Cl layer emerging as the most compatible variant. This specific MXene-Cl layer exhibits remarkable properties, including a total dipole moment (TDM) of 12.443 Debye and a bandgap of 0.570 eV, achieved through meticulous geometry optimization and computational techniques. Notably, THs such as trichloromethane (CHCl3), bromide-chloromethane (CHBrCl2), and dibromochloromethane (CHBr2Cl) demonstrate the highest TDM values, indicating substantial changes in electronic and optical parameters, with TDM values of 16.363, 15.998, and 16.017 Debye, respectively. These findings highlight the potential of the MXene-Cl layer as an effective adsorbent and detector for CHF3, CHClF2, CHCl3, CHBrCl2, and CHBr2Cl. Additionally, we observe a proportional increase in the TDM and bandgap energy, indicative of conductivity, for various termination atom combinations, such as Mxene-O-OH, Mxene-O-F, Mxene-O-Cl, Mxene-OH-F, Mxene-F-Cl, and Mxene-OH-Cl, with bandgap energies measured at 0.734, 0.940, 1.120, 0.835, and 0.927 eV, respectively. Utilizing DFT, we elucidate the adsorption energies of THs on different MXene surfaces. Our results conclusively demonstrate the significant influence of the termination atom nature and quantity on MXene’s primitive TDM value. This research contributes to our understanding of MXene–THs interactions, offering promising avenues for the development of efficient adsorbents and detectors for THs. Ultimately, these advancements hold the potential to revolutionize water sanitation practices and enhance environmental safety. Full article
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10 pages, 2183 KiB  
Article
Resistive Switching in Bigraphene/Diamane Nanostructures Formed on a La3Ga5SiO14 Substrate Using Electron Beam Irradiation
by Evgeny V. Emelin, Hak Dong Cho, Vitaly I. Korepanov, Liubov A. Varlamova, Darya O. Klimchuk, Sergey V. Erohin, Konstantin V. Larionov, Deuk Young Kim, Pavel B. Sorokin and Gennady N. Panin
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(22), 2978; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13222978 - 20 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 855
Abstract
Memristors, resistive switching memory devices, play a crucial role in the energy-efficient implementation of artificial intelligence. This study investigates resistive switching behavior in a lateral 2D composite structure composed of bilayer graphene and 2D diamond (diamane) nanostructures formed using electron beam irradiation. The [...] Read more.
Memristors, resistive switching memory devices, play a crucial role in the energy-efficient implementation of artificial intelligence. This study investigates resistive switching behavior in a lateral 2D composite structure composed of bilayer graphene and 2D diamond (diamane) nanostructures formed using electron beam irradiation. The resulting bigraphene/diamane structure exhibits nonlinear charge carrier transport behavior and a significant increase in resistance. It is shown that the resistive switching of the nanostructure is well controlled using bias voltage. The impact of an electrical field on the bonding of diamane-stabilizing functional groups is investigated. By subjecting the lateral bigraphene/diamane/bigraphene nanostructure to a sufficiently strong electric field, the migration of hydrogen ions and/or oxygen-related groups located on one or both sides of the nanostructure can occur. This process leads to the disruption of sp3 carbon bonds, restoring the high conductivity of bigraphene. Full article
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