Functional Nanostructured Systems for Nanophotonics, Plasmonics and Metamaterials

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanophotonics Materials and Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2023) | Viewed by 3599

Special Issue Editors

Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Óptica (IO, CSIC), Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid, Spain
Interests: applied physics: materials science and optics; light-matter interactions; photonics; nanotechnology; nanophotonics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Óptica (IO, CSIC), Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid, Spain
Interests: nanophotonics; phase-change materials; reconfigurable metasurfaces
Functional NanoBioMaterials Group, CINBIO-Universidad de Vigo, As Lagoas - Marcosende, 36310 Vigo, Spain
Interests: functional materials for nanophotonics; polaritonic organic matter; quantum bio-photonics; biosensing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In this Special Issue we intend to address the use of nanomaterials in nanophotonics, plasmonics and metamaterials for optical applications. Over the last several decades, there has been enormous development in the field of nanophotonics, the science that studies the complex interactions between light and matter at the sub-wavelength scale. As a result, new optical phenomena such as negative refractive index, subwavelength focusing and extraordinary transmission have been demonstrated, amongst others. In turn, these phenomena have shown great potential to be implemented in a wide range of cutting-edge applications, including photovoltaics, optical communications, quantum information processing, lighting, sensing, chemistry, and biology. However, these potential applications require the judicious design and fabrication of new materials based on nanostructured systems in order to meet specifications.

In this Special Issue we invite the submission of original manuscripts devoted to the engineering and realization of nanomaterials for nanophotonics, plasmonics and metamaterials, with special emphasis on real-world applications. We are particularly interested in new material structures and/or reconfigurable functional materials, as well as novel optical phenomena and experimental demonstrations.

In this Special Issue we invite the submission of original manuscripts devoted to the engineering of nanomaterials for nanophotonics, plasmonics and metamaterials for optical applications. We are particularly interested in new material structures and new experimental developments. Topics to be covered include (but are not limited to):

  • Fabrication and optical response of nanomaterial systems ( physical and chemical routes, laser processing, etc.).
  • Exploring the relations between the nature, size, shape, organization of nanostructures and their optical properties (e.g., plasmon resonances, high-refractive-index Mie resonances, anapole resonances, luminescence, non-linear effects).
  • Advanced optical characterization of nanostructured systems or assemblies of nanostructures (e.g., dark-field, near-field, luminescence imaging, ultrafast spectroscopy, ellipsometry/polarimetry).
  • Active and tunable photonic nanomaterial systems, i.e., systems showing reversible tuning of the optical properties of nanostructures.
  • Nanostructured metamaterials for optical applications: fabrication and optical response.
  • Applications (sensing, photocatalysis, photovoltaics, lighting, switching, etc.).

Dr. Rosalia Serna
Dr. Carlota Ruiz De Galarreta
Dr. Sara Nunez-Sanchez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanophotonics
  • plasmonics
  • metamaterials
  • nanomaterials for optical applications
  • high-refractive-index and mie-resonant nanomaterials
  • epsilon near zero nanomaterials
  • quantum confinement in nanomaterials
  • hybrid nanostructures and nanomaterials

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

8 pages, 3427 KiB  
Article
Fano-Like Resonance of Heat-Reconfigurable Silicon Grating Metasurface Tuned by Laser-Induced Graphene
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(3), 492; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13030492 - 25 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1151
Abstract
We propose a heat-reconfigurable metasurface composed of the silicon-based gold grating. The asymmetric Fano-like line shape is formed due to the mutual coupling of the local surface plasmon (LSP) in the gap between the two layers of Au gratings and the surface propagating [...] Read more.
We propose a heat-reconfigurable metasurface composed of the silicon-based gold grating. The asymmetric Fano-like line shape is formed due to the mutual coupling of the local surface plasmon (LSP) in the gap between the two layers of Au gratings and the surface propagating plasmon (SPP) on the surface of the Au gratings. Then, we effectively regulate the Fano resonance by applying a bias voltage to laser-induced graphene (LIG), to generate Joule heat, so that the resonant dip of one mode of the Fano resonance can shift up to 28.5 nm. In contrast, the resonant dip of the other mode barely changes. This effectively regulates the coupling between two resonant modes in Fano resonance. Our study presents a simple and efficient method for regulating Fano-like interference in the near-infrared band. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 3348 KiB  
Article
Resonant Lasing Emission in Undoped and Mg-Doped Gallium Nitride Thin Films on Interfacial Periodic Patterned Sapphire Substrates
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(18), 3238; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12183238 - 18 Sep 2022
Viewed by 1333
Abstract
In this work, low-threshold resonant lasing emission was investigated in undoped and Mg-doped GaN thin films on interfacial designed sapphire substrates. The scattering cross-section of the periodic resonant structure was evaluated by using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method and was found [...] Read more.
In this work, low-threshold resonant lasing emission was investigated in undoped and Mg-doped GaN thin films on interfacial designed sapphire substrates. The scattering cross-section of the periodic resonant structure was evaluated by using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method and was found to be beneficial for reducing the threshold and enhancing the resonant lasing emission within the periodic structures. Compared with undoped and Si-doped GaN thin films, p-type Mg-doped GaN thin films demonstrated a better lasing emission performance. The lasing energy level system and defect densities played vital roles in the lasing emission. This work is beneficial to the realization of multifunctional applications in optoelectronic devices. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 2189 KiB  
Article
Optical Ultracompact Directional Antennas Based on a Dimer Nanorod Structure
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(16), 2841; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12162841 - 18 Aug 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1357
Abstract
Controlling directionality of optical emitters is of utmost importance for their application in communication and biosensing devices. Metallic nanoantennas have been proven to affect both excitation and emission properties of nearby emitters, including the directionality of their emission. In this regard, optical directional [...] Read more.
Controlling directionality of optical emitters is of utmost importance for their application in communication and biosensing devices. Metallic nanoantennas have been proven to affect both excitation and emission properties of nearby emitters, including the directionality of their emission. In this regard, optical directional nanoantennas based on a Yagi–Uda design have been demonstrated in the visible range. Despite this impressive proof of concept, their overall size (~λ2/4) and considerable number of elements represent obstacles for the exploitation of these antennas in nanophotonic applications and for their incorporation onto photonic chips. In order to address these challenges, we investigate an alternative design. In particular, we numerically study the performance of a recently demonstrated “ultracompact” optical antenna based on two parallel gold nanorods arranged as a side-to-side dimer. Our results confirm that the excitation of the antiphase mode of the antenna by a nanoemitter placed in its near-field can lead to directional emission. Furthermore, in order to verify the feasibility of this design and maximize the functionality, we study the effect on the directionality of several parameters, such as the shape of the nanorods, possible defects in the dimer assembly, and different positions and orientations of the nanoemitter. We conclude that this design is robust to structural variations, making it suitable for experimental upscaling. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop