High-Capacity Supercapacitors: Nanotechnologies and Nanomaterials

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy and Catalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 April 2024) | Viewed by 588

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiamen University of Technology, Xiamen, China
Interests: thin films; nanomaterials; supercapacitors; electrochemical catalysis; aqueous batteries

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Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, China
Interests: nanomaterials; functional coatings; electrocatalysis; electrochemical energy storage
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Applications of Fujian Province, Xiamen University of Technology, Xiamen, China
Interests: nanomaterials; energy storage; electrocatalysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the increasing global energy crisis and environmental pollution, the conversion and utilization of new energy and efficient storage technology have become frequently debated topics of scientific research. Supercapacitors, also known as ultracapacitors or electrochemical capacitors, have broad application prospects in electronic devices, electric vehicles, and smart grids due to their high power density, fast charging and discharging, long cycle life, and good safety. However, the low capacity or energy density of supercapacitors has become a major bottleneck restricting their industrial applications.

As is well-known, the energy density of supercapacitors depends on both the specific capacitance of electrode materials and the overall cell voltage. Accordingly, efficient strategies to improve the capacity or energy density of supercapacitors include developing novel electrode materials with a multidimensional nanostructure, designing optimized electrolytes, and building asymmetric/hybrid devices. Nanotechnologies and nanomaterials have revolutionized the field of supercapacitors, leading to significant advancements in their energy storage capacity and overall electrochemical performance. Therefore, in this Special Issue, we are looking for research into novel designs of nanostructured electrode materials, electrolytes, and supercapacitor devices, as well as storage mechanisms analysis using experiments or theoretical calculations. 

Dr. Zhengbing Qi
Dr. Hanfeng Liang
Dr. Binbin Wei
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • supercapacitors
  • nanostructured electrode materials
  • aqueous electrolytes
  • organic electrolytes
  • asymmetric supercapacitors
  • hybrid supercapacitors
  • electrochemical double-layer capacitors
  • pseudo-capacitors

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

17 pages, 3797 KiB  
Article
Simple and Efficient Synthesis of Ruthenium(III) PEDOT:PSS Complexes for High-Performance Stretchable and Transparent Supercapacitors
by Guiming Liu, Zhao Huang, Jiujie Xu, Bowen Zhang, Tiesong Lin and Peng He
Nanomaterials 2024, 14(10), 866; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano14100866 - 16 May 2024
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Abstract
In the evolving landscape of portable electronics, there is a critical demand for components that meld stretchability with optical transparency, especially in supercapacitors. Traditional materials fall short in harmonizing conductivity, stretchability, transparency, and capacity. Although poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) stands out as an exemplary [...] Read more.
In the evolving landscape of portable electronics, there is a critical demand for components that meld stretchability with optical transparency, especially in supercapacitors. Traditional materials fall short in harmonizing conductivity, stretchability, transparency, and capacity. Although poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) stands out as an exemplary candidate, further performance enhancements are necessary to meet the demands of practical applications. This study presents an innovative and effective method for enhancing electrochemical properties by homogeneously incorporating Ru(III) into PEDOT:PSS. These Ru(III) PEDOT:PSS complexes are readily synthesized by dipping PEDOT:PSS films in RuCl3 solution for no longer than one minute, leveraging the high specific capacitance of Ru(III) while minimizing interference with transmittance. The supercapacitor made with this Ru(III) PEDOT:PSS complex demonstrated an areal capacitance of 1.62 mF cm−2 at a transmittance of 73.5%, which was 155% higher than that of the supercapacitor made with PEDOT:PSS under comparable transparency. Notably, the supercapacitor retained 87.8% of its initial capacitance even under 20% tensile strain across 20,000 cycles. This work presents a blueprint for developing stretchable and transparent supercapacitors, marking a significant stride toward next-generation wearable electronics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High-Capacity Supercapacitors: Nanotechnologies and Nanomaterials)
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