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Frontiers in Microextraction for Trace Analysis

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Analytical Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 4415

Special Issue Editors

Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, China
Interests: development of miniaturized sample pretreatment techniques and ICP-MS-based hyphenated techniques
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Centro de Química e Bioquímica, Centro de Química Estrutural, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: analytical chemistry; sample preparation; microextraction techniques; chromatography; hyphenated techniques (GC-MS and LC-MS); environmental analysis; biological analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the trace analysis of analytes of interest, e.g., organic pollutants, heavy metal ions and specific elemental species, sample pretreatment before instrumental detection is of great significance. It serves to determine the analytical sensitivity, anti-interference ability/selectivity and sample throughput of the method to a great extent. As a sample pretreatment strategy, microextraction consumes a small volume of solvents or involves small amounts of sorbents. A variety of microextraction techniques have been developed and applied in trace analysis, including liquid-phase microextraction (LPME), cloud point extraction (CPE), solid-phase microextraction (SPME), capillary microextraction (CME) and stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE). In LPME and CPE, the design and construction of the extraction system is the key point, as it affects the extraction efficiency of interest analytes. In SPME, CME and SBSE, the preparation/synthesis of sorbents/coatings is critical to improve the analytical performance. Moreover, to meet the requirements in real sample analysis involving very limited sample amounts/volumes (e.g., cell analysis), chip-based microextraction is proposed. To further improve the sample throughput, on-line microextraction systems and array microextraction systems have been developed. The rapid development of these microextraction techniques provides reliable technical support for the trace and ultra-trace analysis of environmental and biological samples.

The aim of this Special Issue is to present a collection of articles reflecting the most recent research and developments in the construction of microextraction systems, along with their application in trace analysis. We strongly encourage contributions focusing on microextraction-involved methodologies for the quantification of trace and ultra-trace targets in environmental, biological, food, medical and other real samples.

Dr. Man He
Dr. Nuno Neng
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • liquid phase microextraction
  • cloud point extraction
  • solid phase microextraction
  • capillary microextraction
  • stir bar sorptive extraction
  • chip-based microextraction
  • organic pollutants analysis
  • trace elements analysis
  • elemental speciation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

10 pages, 674 KiB  
Article
Simultaneous Determination of Ciprofloxacin and Ofloxacin in Animal Tissues with the Use of Capillary Electrophoresis with Transient Pseudo-Isotachophoresis
by Izabella Kośka, Krystian Purgat, Rafał Głowacki and Paweł Kubalczyk
Molecules 2021, 26(22), 6931; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26226931 - 17 Nov 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1615
Abstract
We have developed a precise and accurate method for the determination of ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin in meat tissues. Our method utilizes capillary electrophoresis with a transient pseudo-isotachophoresis mechanism and liquid–liquid extraction during sample preparation. For our experiment, a meat tissue sample was homogenized [...] Read more.
We have developed a precise and accurate method for the determination of ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin in meat tissues. Our method utilizes capillary electrophoresis with a transient pseudo-isotachophoresis mechanism and liquid–liquid extraction during sample preparation. For our experiment, a meat tissue sample was homogenized in pH 7.00 phosphate buffer at a ratio of 1:10 (tissue mass: buffer volume; g/mL). The extraction of each sample was carried out twice for 15 min with 600 µL of a mixture of dichloromethane and acetonitrile at a 2:1 volume ratio. We then conducted the electrophoretic separation at a voltage of 16 kV and a temperature of 25 °C using a background electrolyte of 0.1 mol/L phosphate–borate (pH 8.40). We used the UV detection at 288 nm. The experimentally determined LOQs for ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin were 0.27 ppm (0.8 nmol/g tissue) and 0.11 ppm (0.3 nmol/g tissue), respectively. The calibration curves exhibited linearity over the tested concentration range of 2 to 10 nmol/g tissue for both analytes. The relative standard deviation of the determination did not exceed 15%, and the recovery was in the range of 85–115%. We used the method to analyze various meat tissues for their ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin contents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Microextraction for Trace Analysis)
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13 pages, 1689 KiB  
Article
The Use of Single Drop Microextraction and Field Amplified Sample Injection for CZE Determination of Homocysteine Thiolactone in Urine
by Krystian Purgat, Izabella Kośka and Paweł Kubalczyk
Molecules 2021, 26(18), 5687; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26185687 - 20 Sep 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1896
Abstract
Two cheap, simple and reproducible methods for the electrophoretic determination of homocysteine thiolactone (HTL) in human urine have been developed and validated. The first method utilizes off-line single drop microextraction (SDME), whereas the second one uses off-line SDME in combination with field amplified [...] Read more.
Two cheap, simple and reproducible methods for the electrophoretic determination of homocysteine thiolactone (HTL) in human urine have been developed and validated. The first method utilizes off-line single drop microextraction (SDME), whereas the second one uses off-line SDME in combination with field amplified sample injection (FASI). The off-line SDME protocol consists of the following steps: urine dilution with 0.2 mol/L, pH 8.2 phosphate buffer (1:2, v/v), chloroform addition, drop formation and extraction of HTL. The pre-concentration of HTL inside a separation capillary was performed by FASI. For sample separation, the 0.1 mol/L pH 4.75 phosphate buffer served as the background electrolyte, and HTL was detected at 240 nm. A standard fused-silica capillary (effective length 55.5 cm, 75 μm id) and a separation voltage of 21 kV (~99 μA) were used. Electrophoretic separation was completed within 7 min, whereas the LOD and LOQ for HTL were 0.04 and 0.1 μmol/L urine, respectively. The calibration curve in urine was linear in the range of 0.1–0.5 μmol/L, with R2 = 0.9991. The relative standard deviation of the points of the calibration curve varied from 2.4% to 14.9%. The intra- and inter-day precision and recovery were 6.4–10.2% (average 6.0% and 6.7%) and 94.9–102.7% (average 99.7% and 99.5%), respectively. The analytical procedure was successfully applied to the analysis of spiked urine samples obtained from apparently healthy volunteers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers in Microextraction for Trace Analysis)
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