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Food Polyphenols as Affected by Food Processing Conditions

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2023) | Viewed by 10765

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Animal Science, Food and Nutrition (DIANA), Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Piacenza and Cremona Campus, Piacenza, Italy
Interests: foodomics; feedomics; food chemistry; cheese; milk; food quality and traceability
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology, University of Zagreb, Pierottijeva 6, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: 3D food printing; non-thermal processing; green extraction; functional food; food chemistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, the role of polyphenols in human health has emerged, increasing interest in the use of polyphenol-rich ingredients in human nutrition. However, food processing is a critical parameter for the health-promoting role of polyphenols. In this regard, food processing is known to potentially alter the stability, bioavailability, and biological activity of phenolic compounds.

Therefore, contributions to this Special Issue may cover all research aspects related to the characterization of phenolic compounds and their in vitro/in vivo antioxidant capacity, including processing methods and parameters that may affect the stability of polyphenols; the interactions between polyphenols and macronutrients that may affect phenolic profiles, bioavailability, and bioactivity; the characterization of process-related phenolic degradation products; potential modulation of phenolic metabolites on the gut microbiota; and critical reviews of the most important factors that need to be implemented to ensure the stability of phenolic compounds following a "from farm to fork" approach.

Dr. Gabriele Rocchetti
Prof. Dr. Danijela Bursać Kovačević
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • phenolic compounds
  • food processing
  • functional food
  • bioaccessibility
  • gut microbiota
  • biological activity

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 467 KiB  
Article
A Chemometric Investigation on the Functional Potential in High Power Ultrasound (HPU) Processed Strawberry Juice Made from Fruits Harvested at two Stages of Ripeness
by Anica Bebek Markovinović, Predrag Putnik, Paula Bičanić, Dora Brdar, Boris Duralija, Branimir Pavlić, Sanja Milošević, Gabriele Rocchetti, Luigi Lucini and Danijela Bursać Kovačević
Molecules 2023, 28(1), 138; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules28010138 - 24 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1635
Abstract
This work aimed to investigate the influence of high-power ultrasound (HPU) technology on the stability of bioactive compounds in strawberry juices obtained from fruits with different stages of ripeness (75% vs. 100%) and stored at 4 °C for 7 days. HPU parameters were [...] Read more.
This work aimed to investigate the influence of high-power ultrasound (HPU) technology on the stability of bioactive compounds in strawberry juices obtained from fruits with different stages of ripeness (75% vs. 100%) and stored at 4 °C for 7 days. HPU parameters were amplitude (25, 50, 75, and 100%), pulses (50 vs. 100%) and treatment time (5 vs. 10 min). Amplitude and pulse had a significant effect (p ≤ 0.05) on all bioactive compounds except flavonols and hydroxycinnamic acids. The treatment duration of 5 min vs. 10 min had a significant positive impact on the content of anthocyanins, flavonols and condensed tannins, while the opposite was observed for total phenols, whereas no statistically significant effect was observed for hydroxycinnamic acids. The temperature changes during HPU treatment correlated positively with almost all HPU treatment parameters (amplitude, pulse, energy, power, frequency). Optimal parameters of HPU were obtained for temperature changes, where the highest content of a particular group of bioactive compounds was obtained. Results showed that by combining fruits with a certain ripeness and optimal HPU treatment, it would be possible to produce juices with highly preserved bioactive compounds, while HPU technology has prospects for application in functional food products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Polyphenols as Affected by Food Processing Conditions)
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24 pages, 6711 KiB  
Article
Improved Analysis of Isomeric Polyphenol Dimers Using the 4th Dimension of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry—Mass Spectrometry
by Aécio L. de Sousa Dias, Arnaud Verbaere, Emmanuelle Meudec, Stacy Deshaies, Cédric Saucier, Véronique Cheynier and Nicolas Sommerer
Molecules 2022, 27(13), 4176; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27134176 - 29 Jun 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2017
Abstract
Dehydrodicatechins resulting from (epi)catechin oxidation have been investigated in different foods and natural products, but they still offer some analytical challenges. The purpose of this research is to develop a method using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with trapped ion mobility spectrometry and [...] Read more.
Dehydrodicatechins resulting from (epi)catechin oxidation have been investigated in different foods and natural products, but they still offer some analytical challenges. The purpose of this research is to develop a method using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with trapped ion mobility spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC−ESI−TIMS−QTOF−MS/MS) to improve the characterization of dehydrodicatechins from model solutions (oxidation dimers of (+)-catechin and/or (−)-epicatechin). Approximately 30 dehydrodicatechins were detected in the model solutions, including dehydrodicatechins B with β and ε-interflavanic configurations and dehydrodicatechins A with γ-configuration. A total of 11 dehydrodicatechins B, based on (−)-epicatechin, (+)-catechin, or both, were tentatively identified in a grape seed extract. All of them were of β-configuration, except for one compound that was of ε-configuration. TIMS allowed the mobility separation of chromatographically coeluted isomers including dehydrodicatechins and procyanidins with similar MS/MS fragmentation patterns that would hardly be distinguished by LC-MS/MS alone, which demonstrates the superiority of TIMS added to LC-MS/MS for these kinds of compounds. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) was applied to the analysis of dehydrodicatechins. This method can be adapted for other natural products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Polyphenols as Affected by Food Processing Conditions)
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15 pages, 317 KiB  
Article
The Changes in Bioactive Compounds and Antioxidant Activity of Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) Herb under Storage and Different Drying Conditions: A Comparison with Other Species of Sage
by Kinga Dziadek, Aneta Kopeć, Michał Dziadek, Urszula Sadowska and Katarzyna Cholewa-Kowalska
Molecules 2022, 27(5), 1569; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27051569 - 26 Feb 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2263
Abstract
Studies on herb chia (Salvia hispanica L.) are very limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess how different drying methods and periods of storage affect the bioactive properties of the herb Salvia hispanica and to compare it with other [...] Read more.
Studies on herb chia (Salvia hispanica L.) are very limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess how different drying methods and periods of storage affect the bioactive properties of the herb Salvia hispanica and to compare it with other species of sage (Salvia officinalis L. and Salvia sclarea L.). In fresh herbs, directly after drying (freeze-drying, natural drying, and drying at 30, 40, and 50 °C), and after storage (3, 6, and 12 months), the following analyses were performed: content of total carotenoids and total polyphenols, polyphenol profile (including 25 compounds), and antioxidant activity. Additionally, the basic chemical compositions of the herbs were analyzed. To the best of our knowledge, the content of total carotenoids and the quantitative polyphenol profile in Salvia hispanica and Salvia sclarea were evaluated for the first time. The obtained results showed that the barely investigated herb Salvia hispanica is rich in polyphenolic compounds and shows high antioxidant activity. In all the tested species, rosmarinic acid was the most abundant polyphenolic compound. The use of different drying methods allowed us to determine that freeze-drying was the most effective for preserving polyphenols and carotenoids. Long-term storage up to 12 months resulted in a gradual reduction in antioxidant activity and in the content of polyphenols and carotenoids. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Polyphenols as Affected by Food Processing Conditions)
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9 pages, 2255 KiB  
Article
Study on Purification and Characterization of Polyphenol Oxidase from Acetes chinensis
by Jianyou Zhang, Guangcheng Zhou, Lifeng Fei, Lifan Chen, Lei Sun, Fei Lyu and Yuting Ding
Molecules 2021, 26(24), 7545; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26247545 - 13 Dec 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2070
Abstract
Acetes chinensis (belonging to the Decapoda Sergestidae genus) is widely distributed in East Asian waters and is extremely widespread and present in the shallow coastal areas of China. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO), which was extracted from Acetes chinensis, was purified in a four-step [...] Read more.
Acetes chinensis (belonging to the Decapoda Sergestidae genus) is widely distributed in East Asian waters and is extremely widespread and present in the shallow coastal areas of China. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO), which was extracted from Acetes chinensis, was purified in a four-step procedure involving phosphate-buffered saline treatment, ammonium sulphate precipitation, DEAE-Cellulose chromatography, and Phenyl-Sepharose HP chromatography, and then, its biochemical characterization was measured. The specific activity of the purified enzyme was increased to 643.4 U/mg, which is a 30.35 times increase in purification, and the recovery rate was 17.9%. L-dopa was used as the substrate, the enzymatic reactions catalyzed by PPO conformed to the Michaelis equation, the maximum reaction velocity was 769.23 U/mL, and the Michaelis constant Km was 0.846 mmol/L. The optimal pH of PPO from Acetes chinensis was 7.5, and the optimal temperature was 35 °C. The metal ions experiment showed that Mn2+ and K+ could enhance the activity of PPO; that Ba2+ and Ca2+ could inhibit the activity of PPO; and that Cu2+ had a double effect on PPO, increasing the PPO activity at low concentrations and inhibiting the PPO activity at high concentrations. The inhibitor experiment showed that the inhibitory effects of EDTA and kojic acid were weak and that ascorbic acid and sodium pyrophosphate had good inhibitory effects. The purification and characterization of Acetes chinensis serve as guidelines for the prediction of enzyme behavior, leading to effective prevention of enzymatic browning during processing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Polyphenols as Affected by Food Processing Conditions)
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6 pages, 720 KiB  
Communication
In Situ Stability of Anthocyanins in Lycium ruthenicum Murray
by Yanping Wang, Jingxian Fu and Dong Yang
Molecules 2021, 26(23), 7073; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26237073 - 23 Nov 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1724
Abstract
In this research, the effects of drying method, storage temperature, and color protector glucose on anthocyanin preservation in the Lycium ruthenicum Murr. fruit were studied. Compared with hot-air drying, vacuum freeze-drying preserved about 5.8-fold more anthocyanins. The half-life of anthocyanins in the freeze-dried [...] Read more.
In this research, the effects of drying method, storage temperature, and color protector glucose on anthocyanin preservation in the Lycium ruthenicum Murr. fruit were studied. Compared with hot-air drying, vacuum freeze-drying preserved about 5.8-fold more anthocyanins. The half-life of anthocyanins in the freeze-dried fruit samples with glucose was 3.6 days, 1.8 days, and 1.7 days at 4 °C, 20 °C, and 37 °C, respectively. On the other hand, the half-life values without glucose addition were 2.2 days, 2.3 days, and 2.1 days at each temperature, respectively, indicating that glucose protected anthocyanins at low temperature. The composition and contents of anthocyanins and anthocyanidins in the freeze-dried Lycium ruthenicum Murr., stored for 20 days, were investigated with a HPLC-MS/MS setup. It was found that most anthocyanidins in Lycium ruthenicum Murr. are linked with coumaroyl glucose to form anthocyanins, while glycosylated and acetyl-glycosylated anthocyanins were also detected. Five anthocyanidins were detected: delphinidin, cyanidin, petunidin, malvidin, and peonidin, and delphinidin accounts for about half of the total amount of anthocyanidins. It is much more economic to conserve anthocyanins in situ with freeze-drying methods and to store the fruits at low temperatures with glucose. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Polyphenols as Affected by Food Processing Conditions)
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