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Mechanism of Anticancer Activity of Marine Natural Compounds

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Products Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 March 2022) | Viewed by 4488

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Graduate Institute of Marine Biology, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 944, Taiwan
Interests: Structural elucidation; marine secondary metabolites; marine natural products; biological activities; cytotoxic mechanism; in vitro and in vivo assays
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Marine natural products have played a significant role in drug discovery for the last five decades. Secondary metabolites from marine organisms have proven to be highly effective in tackling the most serious health-threatening ailment of the twenty-first century: cancer. Drugs, such as Brentuximab vedotin, Cytarabine, Ara-C, Eribulin mesylate, and Trabectedin, have shown remarkable activity against a wide range of cancers. Other drugs are still in different clinical trial phases, showing promising results. Scientists all over the world are interested in isolating and identifying new anticancer secondary metabolites from novel marine sources. For any new entity to enter clinical trials, the full mechanism of action should be determined using in vitro and in vivo models.

In the current Special Issue, we are interested in original manuscripts and reviews discussing the anticancer mechanism of the action of secondary metabolites that are isolated from marine sources, including bacteria, fungi, sponges, algae, mangroves and coastal plants. We will also consider manuscripts focused on determining the anticancer mechanism of action for semisynthetic compounds of marine origin. By publishing in this Special Issue, scientists will highlight their research and promote their findings through the most widely read and respected journal on marine science.

Prof. Mei-Chin Lu
Prof. Mohamed El-Shazly
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Mechanism of action of marine anticancer agents
  • Anticancer secondary metabolites from sponge
  • Algae secondary metabolites with anticancer activity
  • Anticancer agents from marine bacteria
  • Marine fungi as a source of anticancer agents
  • Mangroves and coastal plants secondary metabolites with anticancer activity

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 51726 KiB  
Article
Polyphenol Oxidase as a Promising Alternative Therapeutic Agent for Cancer Therapy
by Qinqin Yuan, Huixia Guo, Jiajie Ding, Chan Jiao, Yalei Qi, Hajra Zafar, Xueyun Ma, Faisal Raza and Jianqiu Han
Molecules 2022, 27(5), 1515; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27051515 - 23 Feb 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1821
Abstract
Cancers have always been the most difficult to fight, the treatment of cancer is still not considered. Thus, exploring new anticancer drugs is still imminent. Traditional Chinese medicine has played an important role in the treatment of cancer. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) extracted from [...] Read more.
Cancers have always been the most difficult to fight, the treatment of cancer is still not considered. Thus, exploring new anticancer drugs is still imminent. Traditional Chinese medicine has played an important role in the treatment of cancer. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) extracted from Edible mushroom has many related reports on its characteristics, but its role in cancer treatment is still unclear. This study aims to investigate the effects of PPO extracted from Edible mushroom on the proliferation, migration, invasion, and apoptosis of cancer cells in vitro and explore the therapeutic effects of PPO on tumors in vivo. A cell counting kit-8 (CCK8) assay was used to detect the effect of PPO on the proliferation of cancer cells. The effect of PPO on cancer cell migration ability was detected by scratch test. The effect of PPO on the invasion ability of cancer cells was detected by a transwell assay. The effect of PPO on the apoptosis of cancer cells was detected by flow cytometry. Female BALB/c mice (18–25 g, 6–8 weeks) were used for in vivo experiments. The experiments were divided into control group, model group, low-dose group (25 mg/kg), and high-dose group (50 mg/kg). In vitro, PPO extracted from Edible mushroom significantly inhibited the proliferation, migration, and invasion capability of breast cancer cell 4T1, lung cancer cell A549, and prostate cancer cell C4-2, and significantly promoted the apoptosis of 4T1, A549, and C4-2. In vivo experiments showed PPO inhibitory effect on tumor growth. Collectively, the edible fungus extract PPO could play an effective role in treating various cancers, and it may potentially be a promising agent for treating cancers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mechanism of Anticancer Activity of Marine Natural Compounds)
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22 pages, 9296 KiB  
Article
The Antileukemic Effect of Xestoquinone, A Marine-Derived Polycyclic Quinone-Type Metabolite, Is Mediated through ROS-Induced Inhibition of HSP-90
by Kuan-Chih Wang, Mei-Chin Lu, Kai-Cheng Hsu, Mohamed El-Shazly, Shou-Ping Shih, Ssu-Ting Lien, Fu-Wen Kuo, Shyh-Chyun Yang, Chun-Lin Chen and Yu-Chen S. H. Yang
Molecules 2021, 26(22), 7037; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26227037 - 21 Nov 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1993
Abstract
Xestoquinone is a polycyclic quinone-type metabolite with a reported antitumor effect. We tested the cytotoxic activity of xestoquinone on a series of hematological cancer cell lines. The antileukemic effect of xestoquinone was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. This marine metabolite suppressed the [...] Read more.
Xestoquinone is a polycyclic quinone-type metabolite with a reported antitumor effect. We tested the cytotoxic activity of xestoquinone on a series of hematological cancer cell lines. The antileukemic effect of xestoquinone was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. This marine metabolite suppressed the proliferation of Molt-4, K562, and Sup-T1 cells with IC50 values of 2.95 ± 0.21, 6.22 ± 0.21, and 8.58 ± 0.60 µM, respectively, as demonstrated by MTT assay. In the cell-free system, it inhibited the activity of topoisomerase I (Topo I) and II (Topo II) by 50% after treatment with 0.235 and 0.094 μM, respectively. The flow cytometric analysis indicated that the cytotoxic effect of xestoquinone was mediated through the induction of multiple apoptotic pathways in Molt-4 cells. The pretreatment of Molt-4 cells with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) diminished the disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and apoptosis, as well as retaining the expression of both Topo I and II. In the nude mice xenograft model, the administration of xestoquinone (1 μg/g) significantly attenuated tumor growth by 31.2% compared with the solvent control. Molecular docking, Western blotting, and thermal shift assay verified the catalytic inhibitory activity of xestoquinone by high binding affinity to HSP-90 and Topo I/II. Our findings indicated that xestoquinone targeted leukemia cancer cells through multiple pathways, suggesting its potential application as an antileukemic drug lead. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mechanism of Anticancer Activity of Marine Natural Compounds)
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