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Bioactive Compounds for Cosmeceuticals against Skin Diseases

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Products Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2022) | Viewed by 65888

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Granada, 18011 Granada, Spain
Interests: bioactive compounds; phytochemicals; human health; LC-MS; by-products; nutraceuticals; cosmeceuticals
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Granada, Granada, Spain
2. Center of Research and Development of Functional Foods (CIDAF), Granada, Spain
Interests: functional food; bioactive compounds; analytical techniques; mass spectrometry; nutraceuticals; metabolomic studies; by-products revalorization
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Granada, Avda Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada, Spain
Interests: bioactive phenolic compounds; metabolomics; analytical techniques; extraction processes; plant and food analysis; bioavailability
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nowadays, a hot topic in the cosmetic industry is ‘cosmeceuticals’. This term represents the fastest growing area of natural personal care which intends to enhance skin health through ingredients that provide additional health properties or benefits. In fact, they can be considered as cosmetics but contain bioactive compounds that exert different effects on skin function. Generally, the bioactive compounds which are used in this field, such as vitamins or phenolic compounds, are obtained from natural sources, and although the effects of bioactive compounds in individual cosmeceuticals may be small, their magnitude can be increased, synergistically, by combining materials, especially those with different mechanisms of action. For these reasons, the main aim of the Special Issue on “Bioactive Compounds for Cosmeceuticals against Skin Diseases” is to be an open forum where researchers may share their investigations and findings in this promising field and, thanks to the open access platform, increase their visibility and the chances to interact with industries and their production systems. Contributions to this issue, both in the form of original research or review articles, may cover all aspects of bioactive compounds for cosmeceuticals; studies with multidisciplinary input, offering new methodologies or targets, are particularly welcome.

Dr. María De La Luz Cádiz-Gurrea
Prof. Dr. Antonio Segura-Carretero
Prof. Dr. David Arráez-Román
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Cosmeceuticals
  • Bioactive compounds
  • Skin diseases
  • Natural sources
  • Prevention
  • Skin health

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 23971 KiB  
Article
The Natural Janus Kinase Inhibitor Agerarin Downregulates Interleukin-4-Induced PER2 Expression in HaCaT Keratinocytes
by Jeong Yeon Lee, Euitaek Jung, Hyunjin Yeo, Sung Shin Ahn, Yoongho Lim and Young Han Lee
Molecules 2022, 27(13), 4205; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27134205 - 30 Jun 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2538
Abstract
The circadian clock system is closely associated with inflammatory responses. Dysregulation of the circadian clock genes in the skin impairs the skin barrier function and affects the pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis. Interleukin 4 (IL-4) is a proinflammatory cytokine derived from T-helper type 2 [...] Read more.
The circadian clock system is closely associated with inflammatory responses. Dysregulation of the circadian clock genes in the skin impairs the skin barrier function and affects the pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis. Interleukin 4 (IL-4) is a proinflammatory cytokine derived from T-helper type 2 cells; it plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Agerarin (6,7-dimethoxy-2,2-dimethyl-2H-chromene) is a natural JAK1/2/3 inhibitor isolated from Ageratum houstonianum that has a protective effect on the epidermal skin barrier. However, it remains unclear whether agerarin affects the circadian clock system. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of agerarin on IL-4-induced PER2 gene expression in human keratinocytes through reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopic analysis, and real-time bioluminescence analysis. We found that agerarin reduced IL-4-induced PER2 mRNA expression by suppressing the JAK-STAT3 pathway. In addition, real-time bioluminescence analysis in PER2:luc2p promoter-reporter cells revealed that agerarin restored the oscillatory rhythmicity of PER2 promoter activity altered by IL-4. These findings suggest that agerarin may be useful as a cosmeceutical agent against inflammatory skin conditions associated with disrupted circadian rhythms, such as atopic dermatitis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds for Cosmeceuticals against Skin Diseases)
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12 pages, 2621 KiB  
Article
Artemisia anomala Herba Alleviates 2,4-Dinitrochlorobenzene-Induced Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in Mice and the Production of Pro-Inflammatory Mediators in Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-/Interferon Gamma-Induced HaCaT Cells
by Ju-Hye Yang, Kwang-Youn Kim, Young-Woo Kim and Kwang-Il Park
Molecules 2021, 26(17), 5427; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26175427 - 6 Sep 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2845
Abstract
Artemisia anomala S. Moore is a perennial herbaceous plant classified as Asteraceae of the genus Artemisia. Many species of Artemisia have been used as medicinal materials. Artemisia anomala S. Moore has been widely used in China to treat inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanism [...] Read more.
Artemisia anomala S. Moore is a perennial herbaceous plant classified as Asteraceae of the genus Artemisia. Many species of Artemisia have been used as medicinal materials. Artemisia anomala S. Moore has been widely used in China to treat inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanism of its action on the keratinocyte inflammatory response is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the anti-inflammatory reaction of Artemisia anomala S. Moore ethanol extract (EAA) using human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells, which involved investigating the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), signal transducer, and activator of transcription-1 (STAT-1), as well as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways and atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice. We elucidated the anti-inflammatory effects of EAA on tumor necrosis factor-α/interferon-γ (TNF-α/IFN-γ)-treated human keratinocyte cells and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB)-induced atopic dermatitis (AD)-like mice. The levels of chemokines and cytokines (IL-8, IL-6, TARC, and RANTES) were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The NF-κB, STAT-1, and MAPK signaling pathways in HaCaT cells were analyzed by western blotting. Thickening of the mice dorsal and ear skin was measured and inflammatory cell infiltration was observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results showed that EAA suppressed IL-8, IL-6, TARC, and RANTES production. EAA inhibited nuclear translocation of NFκB and STAT-1, as well as reduced the levels of phosphorylated ERK MAPKs. EAA improved AD-like skin lesions in DNCB-treated mice. These findings suggest that EAA possesses stronger anti-inflammatory properties and can be useful as a functional food or candidate agent for AD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds for Cosmeceuticals against Skin Diseases)
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16 pages, 4130 KiB  
Article
Santamarine Shows Anti-Photoaging Properties via Inhibition of MAPK/AP-1 and Stimulation of TGF-β/Smad Signaling in UVA-Irradiated HDFs
by Jung Hwan Oh, Junse Kim, Fatih Karadeniz, Hye Ran Kim, So Young Park, Youngwan Seo and Chang-Suk Kong
Molecules 2021, 26(12), 3585; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26123585 - 11 Jun 2021
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 2913
Abstract
Chronic UVA exposure results in elevated reactive oxygen species in skin which leads to photoaging characterized as upregulated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and loss of collagen. Therefore, natural antioxidants are hailed as promising agents to be utilized against photoaging. In the current study, reynosin [...] Read more.
Chronic UVA exposure results in elevated reactive oxygen species in skin which leads to photoaging characterized as upregulated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and loss of collagen. Therefore, natural antioxidants are hailed as promising agents to be utilized against photoaging. In the current study, reynosin and santamarine, two known sesquiterpene lactones isolated from Artemisia scoparia, were analyzed for their anti-photoaging properties in UVA-irradiated human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). Results showed that UVA irradiation (8 J/cm2) upregulated the MMP-1 secretion and expression, and suppressed collagen production, which were significantly reverted by santamarine treatment (10 µM). Although both reynosin and santamarine exhibited ROS scavenging abilities, reynosin failed to significantly diminish UVA-stimulated MMP-1 release. UVA-irradiated HDFs showed increased collagen production when treated with santamarine. As a mechanism to suppress MMP-1, santamarine significantly suppressed the UVA-induced phosphorylation of p38 and JNK and nuclear translocation of p-c-Fos and p-c-Jun. Santamarine promoted collagen I production via relieving the UVA-induced suppression on TGF-β and its downstream activator Smad2/3 complex. Antioxidant properties of santamarine were also shown to arise from stimulating Nrf2-dependent expression of antioxidant enzymes SOD-1 and HO-1 in UVA-irradiated HDFs. In conclusion, santamarine was found to be a promising natural antioxidant with anti-photoaging properties against UVA-induced damages in HDFs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds for Cosmeceuticals against Skin Diseases)
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23 pages, 6988 KiB  
Article
Ribes nigrum Leaf Extract Preferentially Inhibits IFN-γ-Mediated Inflammation in HaCaT Keratinocytes
by Andrea Magnavacca, Stefano Piazza, Anna Cammisa, Marco Fumagalli, Giulia Martinelli, Flavio Giavarini, Enrico Sangiovanni and Mario Dell’Agli
Molecules 2021, 26(10), 3044; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26103044 - 20 May 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3133
Abstract
Ribes nigrum L. (blackcurrant) leaf extracts, due to high levels of flavonols and anthocyanins, have been shown to exhibit beneficial effects in inflammatory diseases. However, whereas their traditional use has been investigated and validated in several models of inflammation and oxidative stress, the [...] Read more.
Ribes nigrum L. (blackcurrant) leaf extracts, due to high levels of flavonols and anthocyanins, have been shown to exhibit beneficial effects in inflammatory diseases. However, whereas their traditional use has been investigated and validated in several models of inflammation and oxidative stress, the possible impact on skin disorders is still largely unknown. The purpose of this work was to elucidate the effects of R. nigrum leaf extract (RNLE) on keratinocyte-derived inflammatory mediators, elicited by a Th1 or Th2 cytokine milieu. HaCaT cells were challenged with TNF-α, either alone or in combination with the costimulatory cytokines IFN-γ or IL-4, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines and mediators (IL-8, IL-6, s-ICAM-1, and TSLP) was evaluated. The results showed that RNLE preferentially interferes with IFN-γ signaling, demonstrating only negligible activity on TNF-α or IL-4. This effect was attributed to flavonols, which might also account for the ability of RNLE to impair TNF-α/IL-4-induced TSLP release in a cAMP-independent manner. These results suggest that RNLE could have an antiallergic effect mediated in keratinocytes via mechanisms beyond histamine involvement. In conclusion, the discovery of RNLE preferential activity against IFN-γ-mediated inflammation suggests potential selectivity against Th1 type response and the possible use in Th1 inflammatory diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds for Cosmeceuticals against Skin Diseases)
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20 pages, 25006 KiB  
Article
Targeted Hybrid Nanocarriers as a System Enhancing the Skin Structure
by Agnieszka Lewińska, Marta Domżał-Kędzia, Kinga Kierul, Michał Bochynek, Dominika Pannert, Piotr Nowaczyk and Marcin Łukaszewicz
Molecules 2021, 26(4), 1063; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26041063 - 18 Feb 2021
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3181
Abstract
The skin is constantly exposed to external and internal factors that disturb its function. In this work, two nanosystems-levan nanoparticles and a surfactin-stabilized nanoemulsion were preserved (tested for microbial growth) and characterized (size, polydispersity, Zeta potential, and stability). The nanosystems were introduced in [...] Read more.
The skin is constantly exposed to external and internal factors that disturb its function. In this work, two nanosystems-levan nanoparticles and a surfactin-stabilized nanoemulsion were preserved (tested for microbial growth) and characterized (size, polydispersity, Zeta potential, and stability). The nanosystems were introduced in the model formulations-cream, tonic, and gel, and confirmed by TEM. The analysis showed that nanoemulsion has a spherical morphology and size 220–300 nm, while levan nanoparticles had irregular shapes independently of the use of matrix and with particle size (130–260 nm). Additionally, we examined the antiradical effect of levan nanoparticles and nanoemulsion in the prototype of formulations by scavenging DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl; EPR spectroscopy). The model cream with both nanosystems and the whole range of products with nanosystems were evaluated in vivo for hydration, elasticity, smoothness, wrinkles and vascular lesions, discoloration, respectively. The cream improved skin condition in all tested parameters in at least 50% of volunteers. The use of more comprehensive care, additionally consisting of a tonic and gel, reduced the previously existing skin discoloration to 10.42 ± 0.58%. The presented prototype formulations are promising in improving skin conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds for Cosmeceuticals against Skin Diseases)
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Review

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19 pages, 3103 KiB  
Review
Epilobium angustifolium L. as a Potential Herbal Component of Topical Products for Skin Care and Treatment—A Review
by Anna Nowak, Joanna Zielonka-Brzezicka, Magdalena Perużyńska and Adam Klimowicz
Molecules 2022, 27(11), 3536; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27113536 - 31 May 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 4070
Abstract
Epilobium angustifolium L. (EA) has been used as a topical agent since ancient times. There has been an increasing interest in applying EA as a raw material used topically in recent years. However, in the literature, there are not many reports on the [...] Read more.
Epilobium angustifolium L. (EA) has been used as a topical agent since ancient times. There has been an increasing interest in applying EA as a raw material used topically in recent years. However, in the literature, there are not many reports on the comprehensive application of this plant to skin care and treatment. EA contains many valuable secondary metabolites, which determine antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-aging, and antiproliferative activity effects. One of the most important active compounds found in EA is oenothein B (OeB), which increases the level of ROS and protects cells from oxidative damage. OeB also influences wound healing and reduces inflammation by strongly inhibiting hyaluronidase enzymes and inhibiting COX-1 and COX-2 cyclooxygenases. Other compounds that play a key role in the context of application to the skin are flavonoids, which inhibit collagenase and hyaluronidase enzymes, showing anti-aging and anti-inflammatory properties. While terpenes in EA play an important role in fighting bacterial skin infections, causing, among other things cell membrane, permeability increase as well as the modification of the lipid profiles and the alteration of the adhesion of the pathogen to the animal cells. The available scientific information on the biological potential of natural compounds can be the basis for the wider use of EA in skin care and treatment. The aim of the article is to review the existing literature on the dermocosmetic use of E. angustifolium. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds for Cosmeceuticals against Skin Diseases)
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28 pages, 6559 KiB  
Review
Bioactive-Based Cosmeceuticals: An Update on Emerging Trends
by Anju Goyal, Aditya Sharma, Jasanpreet Kaur, Sapna Kumari, Madhukar Garg, Rakesh K. Sindhu, Md. Habibur Rahman, Muhammad Furqan Akhtar, Priti Tagde, Agnieszka Najda, Barbara Banach-Albińska, Katarzyna Masternak, Ibtesam S. Alanazi, Hanan R. H. Mohamed, Attalla F. El-kott, Muddaser Shah, Mousa O. Germoush, Hamdan S. Al-malky, Salman H. Abukhuwayjah, Ahmed E. Altyar, Simona G. Bungau and Mohamed M. Abdel-Daimadd Show full author list remove Hide full author list
Molecules 2022, 27(3), 828; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27030828 - 27 Jan 2022
Cited by 29 | Viewed by 11702
Abstract
Cosmetic-containing herbals are a cosmetic that has or is claimed to have medicinal properties, with bioactive ingredients purported to have medical benefits. There are no legal requirements to prove that these products live up to their claims. The name is a combination of [...] Read more.
Cosmetic-containing herbals are a cosmetic that has or is claimed to have medicinal properties, with bioactive ingredients purported to have medical benefits. There are no legal requirements to prove that these products live up to their claims. The name is a combination of “cosmetics” and “pharmaceuticals”. “Nutricosmetics” are related dietary supplements or food or beverage products with additives that are marketed as having medical benefits that affect appearance. Cosmetic-containing herbals are topical cosmetic–pharmaceutical hybrids intended to enhance the health and beauty of the skin. Cosmetic-containing herbals improve appearance by delivering essential nutrients to the skin. Several herbal products, such as cosmetic-containing herbals, are available. The present review highlights the use of natural products in cosmetic-containing herbals, as natural products have many curative effects as well as healing effects on skin and hair growth with minimal to no side effects. A brief description is given on such plants, their used parts, active ingredients, and the therapeutic properties associated with them. Mainly, the utilization of phytoconstituents as cosmetic-containing herbals in the care of skin and hair, such as dryness of skin, acne, eczema, inflammation of the skin, aging, hair growth, and dandruff, along with natural ingredients, such as for hair colorant, are explained in detail in the present review. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds for Cosmeceuticals against Skin Diseases)
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19 pages, 1996 KiB  
Review
Resveratrol and Immune Cells: A Link to Improve Human Health
by Alessio Alesci, Noemi Nicosia, Angelo Fumia, Federica Giorgianni, Antonello Santini and Nicola Cicero
Molecules 2022, 27(2), 424; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27020424 - 10 Jan 2022
Cited by 59 | Viewed by 6838
Abstract
The use of polyphenols as adjuvants in lowering risk factors for various debilitating diseases has been investigated in recent years due to their possible antioxidant action. Polyphenols represent a fascinating and relatively new subject of research in nutraceuticals and nutrition, with interest rapidly [...] Read more.
The use of polyphenols as adjuvants in lowering risk factors for various debilitating diseases has been investigated in recent years due to their possible antioxidant action. Polyphenols represent a fascinating and relatively new subject of research in nutraceuticals and nutrition, with interest rapidly expanding since they can help maintain health by controlling metabolism, weight, chronic diseases, and cell proliferation. Resveratrol is a phenolic compound found mostly in the pulp, peels, seeds, and stems of red grapes. It has a wide variety of biological actions that can be used to prevent the beginning of various diseases or manage their symptoms. Resveratrol can influence multiple inflammatory and non-inflammatory responses, protecting organs and tissues, thanks to its interaction with immune cells and its activity on SIRT1. This compound has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-apoptotic, neuroprotective, cardioprotective, anticancer, and antiviral properties, making it a potential adjunct to traditional pharmaceutical therapy in public health. This review aims to provide a comprehensive analysis of resveratrol in terms of active biological effects and mechanism of action in modifying the immune cellular response to promote human psychophysical health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds for Cosmeceuticals against Skin Diseases)
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43 pages, 2538 KiB  
Review
Advantages of Hyaluronic Acid and Its Combination with Other Bioactive Ingredients in Cosmeceuticals
by Anca Maria Juncan, Dana Georgiana Moisă, Antonello Santini, Claudiu Morgovan, Luca-Liviu Rus, Andreea Loredana Vonica-Țincu and Felicia Loghin
Molecules 2021, 26(15), 4429; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26154429 - 22 Jul 2021
Cited by 108 | Viewed by 26777
Abstract
This study proposes a review on hyaluronic acid (HA) known as hyaluronan or hyaluronate and its derivates and their application in cosmetic formulations. HA is a glycosaminoglycan constituted from two disaccharides (N-acetylglucosamine and D-glucuronic acid), isolated initially from the vitreous humour of the [...] Read more.
This study proposes a review on hyaluronic acid (HA) known as hyaluronan or hyaluronate and its derivates and their application in cosmetic formulations. HA is a glycosaminoglycan constituted from two disaccharides (N-acetylglucosamine and D-glucuronic acid), isolated initially from the vitreous humour of the eye, and subsequently discovered in different tissues or fluids (especially in the articular cartilage and the synovial fluid). It is ubiquitous in vertebrates, including humans, and it is involved in diverse biological processes, such as cell differentiation, embryological development, inflammation, wound healing, etc. HA has many qualities that recommend it over other substances used in skin regeneration, with moisturizing and anti-ageing effects. HA molecular weight influences its penetration into the skin and its biological activity. Considering that, nowadays, hyaluronic acid has a wide use and a multitude of applications (in ophthalmology, arthrology, pneumology, rhinology, aesthetic medicine, oncology, nutrition, and cosmetics), the present study describes the main aspects related to its use in cosmetology. The biological effect of HA on the skin level and its potential adverse effects are discussed. Some available cosmetic products containing HA have been identified from the brand portfolio of most known manufacturers and their composition was evaluated. Further, additional biological effects due to the other active ingredients (plant extracts, vitamins, amino acids, peptides, proteins, saccharides, probiotics, etc.) are presented, as well as a description of their possible toxic effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds for Cosmeceuticals against Skin Diseases)
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