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Themed Issue Dedicated to Prof. Bernard Boutevin

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Macromolecular Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2024 | Viewed by 9067

Special Issue Editors

ICGM, Univ Montpellier, CNRS, ENSCM, 34095 Montpellier, France
Interests: bio-based material; CNSL; thermoset resin; plasticizer; surfactant
Ingénierie et Architectures Macromoléculaires, Institut Charles Gerhardt, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier (UMR5253-CNRS), 8, rue de l’Ecole Normale, 34296 Montpellier, CEDEX 1, France
Interests: fluorinated polymers; radical polymerization; RDRP (co)polymerization; telomerization
School of Chemical Engineering, University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
Interests: photoredox chemistry; photopolymerization; functional polymers; nanomedicine
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Professor Dr. Bernard Boutevin, born in 1948, received his PhD degree in 1974 from the University of Montpellier, France, and joined the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS). Subsequently, he established a Polymer Laboratory in Montpellier in 1985. Then, he was the director of several research units with more than 100 researchers. He was appointed a full professor in 1999. Pr. Boutevin is a member of the American Chemical Society and Groupe Français d’Etudes et d’Applications des Polymères (GFP).

The topics of his research first concerned the telomerization of a wide variety of monomers including fluoroalkenes but also styrenics and acrylics: kinetics, chemical modifications, and their use in architectured polymers (block and grafted copolymers). The concept was first applied to fluorinated monomers, representing almost half of his scientific articles. His research was then directed toward telechelic oligomers, and all the methods of controlled radical polymerization (or RDRP). In the last decade, he has been quite interested in the synthesis and use of new biobased building blocks and polymers.

Pr. Bernard Boutevin has received many awards (especially from the GFP) and has had a long, distinguished teaching and research career. He has authored more than 600 research publications and been the inventor of more than 100 patents. He has mentored >200 graduate students and postdocs. He is now Professor Emeritus and continues his dedication to scientific research.

Molecules is pleased to announce this Special Issue to celebrate Prof. Bernard Boutevin’s 73rd birthday and his enormous contributions in the field of polymer chemistry. This special issue is dedicated to all aspects of Polymer Chemistry, in particular, following Prof. Bernard Boutevin’s interests.

It is a pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript to this Special Issue. Regular articles, communications, and reviews about polymers are all welcome.

Dr. Benoit Briou
Dr. Bruno Ameduri
Prof. Dr. Cyrille Boyer
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Telomerisation
  • Radical polymerisation
  • Biobased

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 2401 KiB  
Article
Incorporation of Aramids into Polybenzimidazoles to Achieve Ultra-High Thermoresistance and Toughening Effects
Molecules 2024, 29(5), 1058; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules29051058 - 28 Feb 2024
Viewed by 222
Abstract
Polybenzimidazoles (PBIs) are recognized for their remarkable thermal stability due to their unique molecular structure, which is characterized by aromaticity and rigidity. Despite their remarkable thermal attributes, their tensile properties limit their application. To improve the mechanical performance of PBIs, we made a [...] Read more.
Polybenzimidazoles (PBIs) are recognized for their remarkable thermal stability due to their unique molecular structure, which is characterized by aromaticity and rigidity. Despite their remarkable thermal attributes, their tensile properties limit their application. To improve the mechanical performance of PBIs, we made a vital modification to their molecular backbone to improve their structural flexibility. Non-π-conjugated components were introduced into PBIs by grafting meta-polyamide (MA) and para-polyamide (PA) onto PBI backbones to form the copolymers PBI-co-MA and PBI-co-PA. The results indicated that the cooperation between MA and PA significantly enhanced mechanical strain and overall toughness. Furthermore, the appropriate incorporation of aromatic polyamide components (20 mol% for MA and 15% for PA) improved thermal degradation temperatures by more than 30 °C. By investigating the copolymerization of PBIs with MA and PA, we unraveled the intricate relationships between composition, molecular structure, and material performance. These findings advance copolymer design strategies and deepen the understanding of polymer materials, offering tailored solutions that address thermal and mechanical demands across applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Themed Issue Dedicated to Prof. Bernard Boutevin)
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15 pages, 3257 KiB  
Article
A One-Step Approach for a Durable and Highly Hydrophobic Coating for Flax Fabrics for Self-Cleaning Application
Molecules 2024, 29(4), 829; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules29040829 - 13 Feb 2024
Viewed by 503
Abstract
Highly hydrophobic flax fabrics with durable properties were prepared using the “dip-coating” method for self-cleaning application. Flax fabrics were coated with a polysiloxane coating via a hydrosilylation reaction with a Karstedt catalyst at room temperature. The coated fabrics displayed highly and durable hydrophobic [...] Read more.
Highly hydrophobic flax fabrics with durable properties were prepared using the “dip-coating” method for self-cleaning application. Flax fabrics were coated with a polysiloxane coating via a hydrosilylation reaction with a Karstedt catalyst at room temperature. The coated fabrics displayed highly and durable hydrophobic properties (contact angle and sliding angle of about 145° and 23°, respectively) with good self-cleaning ability for certain pollutants and excellent durability. Moreover, the influence of the coating process on the mechanical properties of fabrics was investigated. A decrease in E modulus and an increase in tensile stress at maximum force and elongation at maximum force has been observed. Furthermore, this influence of the coating process can be easily controlled by adjusting the proportion of curing agent in the treatment solution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Themed Issue Dedicated to Prof. Bernard Boutevin)
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19 pages, 4562 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Block Ratio and Structure on the Thermosensitivity of Double and Triple Betaine Block Copolymers
Molecules 2024, 29(2), 390; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules29020390 - 12 Jan 2024
Viewed by 499
Abstract
AB-type and BAB-type betaine block copolymers composed of a carboxybetaine methacrylate and a sulfobetaine methacrylate, PGLBT-b-PSPE and PSPE-b-PGLBT-b-PSPE, respectively, were synthesized by one-pot RAFT polymerization. By optimizing the concentration of the monomer, initiator, and chain transfer agent, [...] Read more.
AB-type and BAB-type betaine block copolymers composed of a carboxybetaine methacrylate and a sulfobetaine methacrylate, PGLBT-b-PSPE and PSPE-b-PGLBT-b-PSPE, respectively, were synthesized by one-pot RAFT polymerization. By optimizing the concentration of the monomer, initiator, and chain transfer agent, block extension with precise ratio control was enabled and a full conversion (~99%) of betaine monomers was achieved at each step. Two sets (total degree of polymerization: ~300 and ~600) of diblock copolymers having four different PGLBT:PSPE ratios were prepared to compare the influence of block ratio and molecular weight on the temperature-responsive behavior in aqueous solution. A turbidimetry and dynamic light scattering study revealed a shift to higher temperatures of the cloud point and micelle formation by increasing the ratio of PSPE, which exhibit upper critical solution temperature (UCST) behavior. PSPE-dominant diblocks created spherical micelles stabilized by PGLBT motifs, and the transition behavior diminished by decreasing the PSPE ratio. No particular change was found in the diblocks that had an identical AB ratio. This trend reappeared in the other set whose entire molecular weight approximately doubled, and each transition point was not recognizably impacted by the total molecular weight. For triblocks, the PSPE double ends provided a higher probability of interchain attractions and resulted in a more turbid solution at higher temperatures, compared to the diblocks which had similar block ratios and molecular weights. The intermediates assumed as network-like soft aggregates eventually rearranged to monodisperse flowerlike micelles. It is expected that the method for obtaining well-defined betaine block copolymers, as well as the relationship of the block ratio and the chain conformation to the temperature-responsive behavior, will be helpful for designing betaine-based polymeric applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Themed Issue Dedicated to Prof. Bernard Boutevin)
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15 pages, 2883 KiB  
Article
Original Fluorinated Non-Isocyanate Polyhydroxyurethanes
Molecules 2023, 28(4), 1795; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules28041795 - 14 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1308
Abstract
New fluorinated polyhydroxyurethanes (FPHUs) with various molar weights were synthesized via the polyaddition reaction of a fluorinated telechelic bis(cyclocarbonate) (bis-CC) with a diamine. The fluorinated bis-CC was initially synthesized by carbonylation of a fluorinated diepoxide, 1,4-bis(2′,3′-epoxypropyl)perfluorobutane, in the presence of LiBr catalyst, in [...] Read more.
New fluorinated polyhydroxyurethanes (FPHUs) with various molar weights were synthesized via the polyaddition reaction of a fluorinated telechelic bis(cyclocarbonate) (bis-CC) with a diamine. The fluorinated bis-CC was initially synthesized by carbonylation of a fluorinated diepoxide, 1,4-bis(2′,3′-epoxypropyl)perfluorobutane, in the presence of LiBr catalyst, in high yield. Then, several reaction conditions were optimized through the model reactions of the fluorinated bis-CC with hexylamine. Subsequently, fluorinated polymers bearing hydroxyurethane moieties (FPHUs) were prepared by reacting the bis-CC with different hexamethylenediamine amounts in bulk at 80 °C and the presence of a catalyst. The chemoselective polymerization reaction yielded three isomers bearing primary and secondary hydroxyl groups in 61–82% yield. The synthesized fluorinated CCs and the corresponding FPHUs were characterized by 1H, 19F, and 13C NMR spectroscopy. They were compared to their hydrogenated homologues synthesized in similar conditions. The gel permeation chromatography (GPC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data of the FPHUs revealed a higher molar mass and a slight increase in glass transition and decomposition temperatures compared to those of the PHUs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Themed Issue Dedicated to Prof. Bernard Boutevin)
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9 pages, 618 KiB  
Article
Using Triethylborane to Manipulate Reactivity Ratios in Epoxide-Anhydride Copolymerization: Application to the Synthesis of Polyethers with Degradable Ester Functions
Molecules 2022, 27(2), 466; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27020466 - 11 Jan 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2326
Abstract
The anionic ring-opening copolymerization (ROCOP) of epoxides, namely of ethylene oxide (EO), with anhydrides (AH) generally produces strictly alternating copolymers. With triethylborane (TEB)-assisted ROCOP of EO with AH, statistical copolymers of high molar mass including ether and ester units could be obtained. In [...] Read more.
The anionic ring-opening copolymerization (ROCOP) of epoxides, namely of ethylene oxide (EO), with anhydrides (AH) generally produces strictly alternating copolymers. With triethylborane (TEB)-assisted ROCOP of EO with AH, statistical copolymers of high molar mass including ether and ester units could be obtained. In the presence of TEB, the reactivity ratio of EO (rEO), which is normally equal to 0 in its absence, could be progressively raised to values lower than 1 or higher than 1. Conditions were even found to obtain rEO equal or close to 1. Samples of P(EO-co-ester) with minimal compositional drift could be synthesized; upon basic degradation of their ester linkages, these samples afforded poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) diol samples of narrow molar mass distribution. In other cases where rEO were lower or higher than 1, the PEO diol samples eventually isolated after degradation exhibited a broader distribution of molar masses because of the compositional drift of initial P(EO-co-ester) samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Themed Issue Dedicated to Prof. Bernard Boutevin)
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Review

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26 pages, 5758 KiB  
Review
Monomers and Macromolecular Materials from Renewable Resources: State of the Art and Perspectives
Molecules 2022, 27(1), 159; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27010159 - 28 Dec 2021
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 3082
Abstract
A progressively increasing concern about the environmental impacts of the whole polymer industry has boosted the design of less aggressive technologies that allow for the maximum use of carbon atoms, and reduced dependence on the fossil platform. Progresses related to the former approach [...] Read more.
A progressively increasing concern about the environmental impacts of the whole polymer industry has boosted the design of less aggressive technologies that allow for the maximum use of carbon atoms, and reduced dependence on the fossil platform. Progresses related to the former approach are mostly based on the concept of the circular economy, which aims at a thorough use of raw materials, from production to disposal. The latter, however, has been considered a priority nowadays, as short-term biological processes can efficiently provide a myriad of chemicals for the polymer industry. Polymers from renewable resources are widely established in research and technology facilities from all over the world, and a broader consolidation of such materials is expected in a near future. Herein, an up-to-date overview of the most recent and relevant contributions dedicated to the production of monomers and polymers from biomass is presented. We provide some basic issues related to the preparation of polymers from renewable resources to discuss ongoing strategies that can be used to achieve original polymers and systems thereof. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Themed Issue Dedicated to Prof. Bernard Boutevin)
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