molecules-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Natural Compounds against Human Skin Aging

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Products Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2023) | Viewed by 19682

Special Issue Editors

Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0609, USA
Interests: skin aging; ECM; fibroblast; skin cancer
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
UCIBIO/REQUIMTE, MedTech-Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology, Department of Drug Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira nº 228, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal
Interests: antioxidants; natural products; sunscreens and anti-aging cosmetics; phototoxicity; photostability and photoprotection; mechanical and sensory characterization of topical formulations; patient centric design of topical products; health literacy in cosmetology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Skin is the most voluminous connective tissue of the body. Skin, similarly to all human organs, undergoes progressive alterations as a consequence of the passage of time (natural aging). Human skin, unlike other organs, continuously experiences harmful exposure from environmental sources such as solar ultraviolet irradiation (photoaging). Aging skin deleteriously influences the risk of developing age-related skin diseases, such as increased fragility, impaired vasculature support, delayed wound healing, and skin cancer development. The skin, especially facial skin, is the most noticeable part of our body and most visible indicators of age, health, and disease, and it has significant social and psychological impacts. This Special Issue will describe our current understanding of how natural compounds affect skin aging and its prevention by emphasizing the potential development of mechanism-based anti-skin aging products.

Prof. Dr. Taihao Quan
Prof. Dr. Isabel Martins de Almeida
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • skin aging
  • collagen
  • MMPs
  • skin barrier
  • natural product
  • rejuvenation

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

21 pages, 4218 KiB  
Article
A Novel Approach in Skin Care: By-Product Extracts as Natural UV Filters and an Alternative to Synthetic Ones
Molecules 2023, 28(5), 2037; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules28052037 - 21 Feb 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2772
Abstract
The cosmetic industry has been focusing on replacing synthetic ingredients with natural ones, taking advantage of their bioactive compounds. This work assessed the biological properties of onion peel (OP) and passion fruit peel (PFP) extracts in topical formulations as an alternative to synthetic [...] Read more.
The cosmetic industry has been focusing on replacing synthetic ingredients with natural ones, taking advantage of their bioactive compounds. This work assessed the biological properties of onion peel (OP) and passion fruit peel (PFP) extracts in topical formulations as an alternative to synthetic antioxidants and UV filters. The extracts were characterized regarding their antioxidant capacity, antibacterial capacity and sun protection factor (SPF) value. Results revealed that the OP extract exhibited better results, which can result from the high concentrations of quercetin, as identified and quantified in HPLC analysis. Afterward, nine formulations of O/W creams were produced with minor changes in the quantity of additives: OP and PFP extract (natural antioxidants and UV filters), BHT (synthetic antioxidant) and oxybenzone (synthetic UV filter). The stability of the formulations was determined for 28 days; it was verified that they remained stable throughout the study period. The assays of the formulations’ antioxidant capacity and SPF value revealed that OP and PFP extracts have some photoprotective properties and are excellent sources of antioxidants. As a result, they can be incorporated in daily moisturizers with SPF and sunscreens replacing and/or diminishing the quantities of synthetic ingredients, reducing their negative effects on human health and the environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Compounds against Human Skin Aging)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

14 pages, 1520 KiB  
Article
Hesperidin, Hesperetin, Rutinose, and Rhamnose Act as Skin Anti-Aging Agents
Molecules 2023, 28(4), 1728; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules28041728 - 11 Feb 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2475
Abstract
Aging is a complex physiological process that can be accelerated by chemical (high blood glucose levels) or physical (solar exposure) factors. It is accompanied by the accumulation of altered molecules in the human body. The accumulation of oxidatively modified and glycated proteins is [...] Read more.
Aging is a complex physiological process that can be accelerated by chemical (high blood glucose levels) or physical (solar exposure) factors. It is accompanied by the accumulation of altered molecules in the human body. The accumulation of oxidatively modified and glycated proteins is associated with inflammation and the progression of chronic diseases (aging). The use of antiglycating agents is one of the recent approaches in the preventive strategy of aging and natural compounds seem to be promising candidates. Our study focused on the anti-aging effect of the flavonoid hesperetin, its glycoside hesperidin and its carbohydrate moieties rutinose and rhamnose on young and physiologically aged normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs). The anti-aging activity of the test compounds was evaluated by measuring matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and inflammatory interleukins by ELISA. The modulation of elastase, hyaluronidase, and collagenase activity by the tested substances was evaluated spectrophotometrically by tube tests. Rutinose and rhamnose inhibited the activity of pure elastase, hyaluronidase, and collagenase. Hesperidin and hesperetin inhibited elastase and hyaluronidase activity. In skin aging models, MMP-1 and MMP-2 levels were reduced after application of all tested substances. Collagen I production was increased after the application of rhamnose and rutinose. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Compounds against Human Skin Aging)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

17 pages, 3953 KiB  
Article
Snail Slime Extracted by a Cruelty Free Method Preserves Viability and Controls Inflammation Occurrence: A Focus on Fibroblasts
Molecules 2023, 28(3), 1222; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules28031222 - 26 Jan 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 4694
Abstract
Snail slime (SS) is a viscous secretion obtained from different snail species. SS composition is variable according to factors such as the extraction method. Even if several papers have been published regarding this topic, the molecular mechanisms at the base of SS biological [...] Read more.
Snail slime (SS) is a viscous secretion obtained from different snail species. SS composition is variable according to factors such as the extraction method. Even if several papers have been published regarding this topic, the molecular mechanisms at the base of SS biological effects remain unexplored. Thus, the aim of this study is to evaluate the capability of SS, extracted with the cruelty-free Muller method, to promote viability and angiogenesis processes and, in parallel, to counteract inflammation occurrence on skin cell populations. SS was administered to keratinocytes, macrophages and fibroblasts, then cell viability, through 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test, cytotoxicity by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay, morphology by haematoxylin-eosin staining, gene and protein expression through real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot, cell cycle phases by flow cytometry, and collagen secretion using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test, were measured. Our results evidence SS capability to promote fibroblast viability and to trigger recovery mechanisms by activating the Erk protein. Moreover, an appreciable anti-inflammatory effect due to the significant reduction in cyclooxygenase-2 expression, and a positive modulation of new blood vessel formation demonstrated by increased Angiopoietin 1 gene expression and a higher matrix deposition (evidenced by the augmented amount of released collagen I) can be identified. This evidence led us to assume that the Muller method extracted-SS represents a valuable and promising natural product suitable for cosmetic and skin care formulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Compounds against Human Skin Aging)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

18 pages, 2909 KiB  
Article
Saccorhiza polyschides—A Source of Natural Active Ingredients for Greener Skincare Formulations
Molecules 2022, 27(19), 6496; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27196496 - 01 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1938
Abstract
The growing knowledge about the harmful effects caused by some synthetic ingredients present in skincare products has led to an extensive search for natural bioactives. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the dermatological potential of five fractions (F1–F5), obtained by a sequential extraction [...] Read more.
The growing knowledge about the harmful effects caused by some synthetic ingredients present in skincare products has led to an extensive search for natural bioactives. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the dermatological potential of five fractions (F1–F5), obtained by a sequential extraction procedure, from the brown seaweed Saccorhiza polyschides. The antioxidant (DPPH, FRAP, ORAC and TPC), anti-enzymatic (collagenase, elastase, hyaluronidase and tyrosinase), antimicrobial (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Cutibacterium acnes and Malassezia furfur), anti-inflammatory (nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and interleukin-10) and photoprotective (reactive oxygen species) properties of all fractions were evaluated. The ethyl acetate fraction (F3) displayed the highest antioxidant and photoprotective capacity, reducing ROS levels in UVA/B-exposed 3T3 fibroblasts, and the highest anti-enzymatic capacity against tyrosinase (IC50 value: 89.1 µg/mL). The solid water-insoluble fraction (F5) revealed the greatest antimicrobial activity against C. acnes growth (IC50 value: 12.4 µg/mL). Furthermore, all fractions demonstrated anti-inflammatory potential, reducing TNF-α and IL-6 levels in RAW 264.7 macrophages induced with lipopolysaccharides. Chemical analysis of the S. polyschides fractions by NMR revealed the presence of different classes of compounds, including lipids, polyphenols and sugars. The results highlight the potential of S. polyschides to be incorporated into new nature-based skincare products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Compounds against Human Skin Aging)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 6044 KiB  
Article
Anti-Photoaging Activity of Scutellaria barbata D. Don (Family Lamiaceae) on Ultraviolet B-Irradiated NIH-3T3 Skin Fibroblast and SKH-1 Hairless Mouse
Molecules 2022, 27(12), 3803; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27123803 - 13 Jun 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1958
Abstract
We investigated whether Scutellaria barbata D. Don (Family Lamiaceae) (SBD), a traditional medicine used for heat clearing and detoxification, possesses antiphotoaging properties. Pretreatment of NIH-3T3 skin fibroblast cells with non-toxicological levels of water extract of SBD (WESBD) and ethanol extract of SBD (EESBD) [...] Read more.
We investigated whether Scutellaria barbata D. Don (Family Lamiaceae) (SBD), a traditional medicine used for heat clearing and detoxification, possesses antiphotoaging properties. Pretreatment of NIH-3T3 skin fibroblast cells with non-toxicological levels of water extract of SBD (WESBD) and ethanol extract of SBD (EESBD) restored the expression of procollagen type-1 (COL1A1), matrix metalloproteinase-1a (MMP-1a), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and monocyte chemotactic protein-3 (MCP-3) genes following abnormal expression induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation. WESBD/EESBD administration to the dorsal skin area of hairless mice significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited UVB-induced wrinkle formation and epidermal thickness. The WESBD and EESBD treatments also restored the dermal collagen content, which was decreased by the UVB treatment, and normal COL1A1 and MMP-1a expression. Interestingly, both the WESBD and EESBD pretreatments significantly attenuated UVB-induced phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) but not that of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). This finding indicates that the antiphotoaging effects of WESBD and EESBD may be related to attenuation of UVB-induced overactivation of AKT phosphorylation. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry analysis revealed that isorhamentin and scutebarbatine I were major single components of EESBD. These results suggest that WESBD and EESBD may have potential in development as antiphotoaging agents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Compounds against Human Skin Aging)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

29 pages, 2328 KiB  
Review
Recent Advances in Herbal-Derived Products with Skin Anti-Aging Properties and Cosmetic Applications
Molecules 2022, 27(21), 7518; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27217518 - 03 Nov 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 5070
Abstract
Although aesthetic benefits are a desirable effect of the treatment of skin aging, it is also important in controlling several skin diseases, mainly in aged people. The development of new dermocosmetics has rapidly increased due to consumers’ demand for non-invasive products with lower [...] Read more.
Although aesthetic benefits are a desirable effect of the treatment of skin aging, it is also important in controlling several skin diseases, mainly in aged people. The development of new dermocosmetics has rapidly increased due to consumers’ demand for non-invasive products with lower adverse effects than those currently available on the market. Natural compounds of plant origin and herbal-derived formulations have been popularized due to their various safe active products, which act through different mechanisms of action on several signaling pathways for skin aging. Based on this, the aim of the review was to identify the recent advances in herbal-derived product research, including herbal formulations and isolated compounds with skin anti-aging properties. The studies evaluated the biological effects of herbal-derived products in in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo studies, highlighting the effects that were reported in clinical trials with available pharmacodynamics data that support their protective effects to treat, prevent, or control human skin aging. Thus, it was possible to identify that gallic and ferulic acids and herbal formulations containing Thymus vulgaris, Panax ginseng, Triticum aestivum, or Andrographis paniculata are the most promising natural products for the development of new dermocosmetics with skin anti-aging properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Compounds against Human Skin Aging)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop