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Natural Products from Medicinal Plants

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Natural Products Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2023) | Viewed by 24351

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan
Interests: natural product chemistry; bioactive natural products; new drug R&D; translation research; cosmetic and functional food R&D; Chinese herbal medicine biotechnology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue wishes to provide an intellectual platform for scientists to publish review, original research, short communication, etc., covering the topics of bioactive natural products (NPs), biological activities, and analytical methodologies in relation to medicinal plants, as well as related disciplines of topical interest to public health.

Natural products isolated from various sources, especially derived from plants, have long been used in the treatment of human ailments. The approach to new drugs through natural products has proven to be the single most successful strategy for the discovery of new drugs. NPs have long been considered a crucial source of drugs and are still considered a beneficial starting point in modern drug discovery. NPs and their derivatives have made a crucial contribution to pharmacotherapy in many human diseases. NPs are characterized by structural complexity along with skeleton diversity, and because of this, NPs continue to be an important source of leads for new drugs. 

This Special Issue of Molecules aims to provide an extensive look at the natural products in lead compound and drug discovery and will focus on the isolation and structure elucidation of new natural products, the mechanism of action, and bioactive compounds with a clinical potential. This Special Issue invites researchers to contribute reviews and original research reports of their recent work on preparing and identifying phytochemicals and their physiological mechanisms in health benefits.

Prof. Dr. Jih-Jung Chen
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • natural products
  • medicinal plants
  • drug discovery
  • bioactive constituent
  • biological activity
  • analytical methodology
  • sample preparation method
  • healthy food
  • drug and herbal medicine
  • mechanism of action

Published Papers (13 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 3435 KiB  
Article
Antioxidative Activities of Micronized Solid-State Cultivated Hericium erinaceus Rich in Erinacine A against MPTP-Induced Damages
by Chun-Hsien Hsu, En-Chih Liao, Win-Chin Chiang and Kai-Lee Wang
Molecules 2023, 28(8), 3386; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules28083386 - 12 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1911
Abstract
The Lion’s mane mushroom (Hericium erinaceus, HE) is a traditional medical mushroom with high nutritional and economic value. HE possesses anticancer, antimicrobial, antioxidant, immunomodulating, neurotrophic, and neuroprotective activities. The present study evaluated the protection and antioxidative activities of micronized mycelium of HE (HEM) [...] Read more.
The Lion’s mane mushroom (Hericium erinaceus, HE) is a traditional medical mushroom with high nutritional and economic value. HE possesses anticancer, antimicrobial, antioxidant, immunomodulating, neurotrophic, and neuroprotective activities. The present study evaluated the protection and antioxidative activities of micronized mycelium of HE (HEM) in mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPTP). HEM was cultivated via solid-state fermentation and micronized using cell wall-breaking technology to increase its bioavailability when ingested. Erinacine A, the bioactive compound in the HEM, played a pivotal role in antioxidant defense. We found that micronized HEM could recover the dopamine level in the mice striatum in a dose-dependent manner that had been greatly reduced during MPTP treatment. Moreover, the malondialdehyde (MDA) and carbonyl levels were reduced in the livers and brains of the MPTP + HEM-treated groups compared with the MPTP group. Additionally, antioxidant enzyme activities, including catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), and glutathione reductase (GRd), were elevated after the administration of HEM in MPTP-treated mice in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, our data indicate that HEM cultivated via solid-state fermentation and processed with cell wall-breaking technology showed an excellent antioxidant efficacy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products from Medicinal Plants)
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23 pages, 4495 KiB  
Article
Cleistocalyx nervosum var. paniala Berry Seed Protects against TNF-α-Stimulated Neuroinflammation by Inducing HO-1 and Suppressing NF-κB Mechanism in BV-2 Microglial Cells
by Sakawrat Janpaijit, Chanin Sillapachaiyaporn, Atsadang Theerasri, Somsri Charoenkiatkul, Monruedee Sukprasansap and Tewin Tencomnao
Molecules 2023, 28(7), 3057; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules28073057 - 29 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1246
Abstract
Sustained inflammatory responses have been implicated in various neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs). Cleistocalyx nervosum var. paniala (CN), an indigenous berry, has been reported to exhibit several health-beneficial properties. However, investigation of CN seeds is still limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate [...] Read more.
Sustained inflammatory responses have been implicated in various neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs). Cleistocalyx nervosum var. paniala (CN), an indigenous berry, has been reported to exhibit several health-beneficial properties. However, investigation of CN seeds is still limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate the protective effects of ethanolic seed extract (CNSE) and mechanisms in BV-2 mouse microglial cells using an inflammatory stimulus, TNF-α. Using LC-MS, ferulic acid, aurentiacin, brassitin, ellagic acid, and alpinetin were found in CNSE. Firstly, we examined molecular docking to elucidate its bioactive components on inflammation-related mechanisms. The results revealed that alpinetin, aurentiacin, and ellagic acid inhibited the NF-κB activation and iNOS function, while alpinetin and aurentiacin only suppressed the COX-2 function. Our cell-based investigation exhibited that cells pretreated with CNSE (5, 10, and 25 μg/mL) reduced the number of spindle cells, which was highly observed in TNF-α treatment (10 ng/mL). CNSE also obstructed TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 mRNA levels and repressed the TNF-α and IL-6 releases in a culture medium of BV-2 cells. Remarkably, CNSE decreased the phosphorylated forms of ERK, p38MAPK, p65, and IκB-α related to the inhibition of NF-κB binding activity. CNSE obviously induced HO-1 protein expression. Our findings suggest that CNSE offers good potential for preventing inflammatory-related NDDs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products from Medicinal Plants)
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42 pages, 1296 KiB  
Article
Phytochemical Profile and Antimicrobial Potential of Propolis Samples from Kazakhstan
by Jarosław Widelski, Piotr Okińczyc, Katarzyna Suśniak, Anna Malm, Emil Paluch, Asanali Sakipov, Gulsim Zhumashova, Galiya Ibadullayeva, Zuriyadda Sakipova and Izabela Korona-Glowniak
Molecules 2023, 28(7), 2984; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules28072984 - 27 Mar 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1688
Abstract
In the current paper, we present the results of Kazakh propolis investigations. Due to limited data about propolis from this country, research was focused mainly on phytochemical analysis and evaluation of propolis antimicrobial activity. uHPLC-DAD (ultra-high-pressure-liquid chromatography coupled with diode array detection, UV/VIS) [...] Read more.
In the current paper, we present the results of Kazakh propolis investigations. Due to limited data about propolis from this country, research was focused mainly on phytochemical analysis and evaluation of propolis antimicrobial activity. uHPLC-DAD (ultra-high-pressure-liquid chromatography coupled with diode array detection, UV/VIS) and uHPLC-MS/MS (ultra-high-pressure-liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry) were used to phytochemical characteristics while antimicrobial activity was evaluated in the serial dilution method (MIC, minimal inhibitory concentration, and MBC/MFC, minimal bactericidal/fungicidal concentration measurements). In the study, Kazakh propolis exhibited a strong presence of markers characteristic of poplar-type propolis—flavonoid aglycones (pinocembrin, galangin, pinobanksin and pinobanskin-3-O-acetate) and hydroxycinnamic acid monoesters (mainly caffeic acid phenethyl ester and different isomers of caffeic acid prenyl ester). The second plant precursor of Kazakh propolis was aspen–poplar with 2-acetyl-1,3-di-p-coumaroyl glycerol as the main marker. Regarding antimicrobial activity, Kazakh propolis revealed stronger activity against reference Gram-positive strains (MIC from 31.3 to above 4000 mg/L) and yeasts (MIC from 62.5 to 1000 mg/L) than against reference Gram-negative strains (MIC ≥ 4000 mg/L). Moreover, Kazakh propolis showed good anti-Helicobacter pylori activity (MIC and MBC were from 31.3 to 62.5 mg/L). All propolis samples were also tested for H. pylori urease inhibitory activity (IC50, half-maximal inhibitory concentration, ranged from 440.73 to 11,177.24 µg/mL). In summary Kazakh propolis are potent antimicrobial agents and may be considered as a medicament in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products from Medicinal Plants)
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12 pages, 1119 KiB  
Article
Polyoxypregnane Glycosides from Root of Marsdenia tenacissima and Inhibited Nitric Oxide Levels in LPS Stimulated RAW 264.7 Cells
by Zhi Na, Pianchou Gongpan and Qingfei Fan
Molecules 2023, 28(2), 886; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules28020886 - 16 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1383
Abstract
Six new polyoxypregnane glycosides, marstenacisside F1–F3 (13), G1–G2 (45) and H1 (6), as well as 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-D-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-oleandropyranosyl-11α,12β-di-O-benzoyl-tenacigenin B (7), were isolated from the roots of Marsdenia tenacissima [...] Read more.
Six new polyoxypregnane glycosides, marstenacisside F1–F3 (13), G1–G2 (45) and H1 (6), as well as 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-6-deoxy-3-O-methyl-β-D-allopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-D-oleandropyranosyl-11α,12β-di-O-benzoyl-tenacigenin B (7), were isolated from the roots of Marsdenia tenacissima. Their structures were established by an extensive interpretation of their 1D and 2D NMR and HRESIMS data. Compounds 17 were tenacigenin B derivatives with an oligosaccharide chain at C-3. This was the first time that compound 7 had been isolated from the title plant and its 1H and 13C NMR data were reported. Compounds 4 and 5 were the first examples of C21 steroid glycoside bearing unique β-glucopyranosyl-(1→4)-β-glucopyranose sugar moiety. All the isolated compounds were evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting nitric oxide (NO) production in the lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW 264.7 cells. The results showed that marstenacisside F1 and F2 exhibited significant NO inhibitory activity with an inhibition rate of 48.19 ± 4.14% and 70.33 ± 5.39%, respectively, at 40 μM, approximately equal to the positive control (L-NMMA, 68.03 ± 0.72%). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products from Medicinal Plants)
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11 pages, 1458 KiB  
Article
Vanillin Induces Relaxation in Rat Mesenteric Resistance Arteries by Inhibiting Extracellular Ca2+ Influx
by Sooyeon Choi, Chae Eun Haam, Eun-Yi Oh, Seonhee Byeon, Soo-Kyoung Choi and Young-Ho Lee
Molecules 2023, 28(1), 288; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules28010288 - 29 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1495
Abstract
Vanillin is a phenolic aldehyde, which is found in plant species of the Vanilla genus. Although recent studies have suggested that vanillin has various beneficial properties, the effect of vanillin on blood vessels has not been studied well. In the present study, we [...] Read more.
Vanillin is a phenolic aldehyde, which is found in plant species of the Vanilla genus. Although recent studies have suggested that vanillin has various beneficial properties, the effect of vanillin on blood vessels has not been studied well. In the present study, we investigated whether vanillin has vascular effects in rat mesenteric resistance arteries. To examine the vascular effect of vanillin, we measured the isometric tension of arteries using a multi-wire myograph system. After the arteries were pre-contracted with high K+ (70 mM) or phenylephrine (5 µM), vanillin was administered. Vanillin induced concentration-dependent vasodilation. Endothelial denudation or treatment of eNOS inhibitor (L-NNA, 300 μM) did not affect the vasodilation induced by vanillin. Treatment of K+ channel inhibitor (TEA, 10 mM) or sGC inhibitor (ODQ, 10 μM) or COX-2 inhibitor (indomethacin, 10 μM) did not affect the vanillin-induced vasodilation either. The treatment of vanillin decreased the contractile responses induced by Ca2+ addition. Furthermore, vanillin significantly reduced vascular contraction induced by BAY K 8644 (30 nM). Vanillin induced concentration-dependent vascular relaxation in rat mesenteric resistance arteries, which was endothelium-independent. Inhibition of extracellular Ca2+ influx was involved in vanillin-induced vasodilation. Treatment of vanillin reduced phopsho-MLC20 in vascular smooth muscle cells. These results suggest the possibility of vanillin as a potent vasodilatory molecule. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products from Medicinal Plants)
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13 pages, 1956 KiB  
Article
Vasorelaxant Effect of Trachelospermi caulis Extract on Rat Mesenteric Resistance Arteries
by Chae Eun Haam, Seonhee Byeon, Sooyeon Choi, Eun Yi Oh, Soo-Kyoung Choi and Young-Ho Lee
Molecules 2022, 27(16), 5300; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27165300 - 19 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1263
Abstract
Background: Trachelospermi caulis (T. caulis) has been used as a traditional herbal medicine in Asian countries. Although it is well known that T. caulis has beneficial effects, no sufficient research data are available on the cardiovascular effect of T. caulis. [...] Read more.
Background: Trachelospermi caulis (T. caulis) has been used as a traditional herbal medicine in Asian countries. Although it is well known that T. caulis has beneficial effects, no sufficient research data are available on the cardiovascular effect of T. caulis. We investigated whether T. caulis extract has vascular effects in rat resistance arteries in this study. Methods: To examine whether T. caulis extract affects vascular reactivity, we measured isometric tension of rat mesenteric resistance arteries using a multi-wire myograph system. T. caulis extract was administered after arteries were pre-contracted with high K+ (70 mM) or phenylephrine (5 µM). Vanillin, a single active component of T. caulis, was used to treat mesenteric arteries. Results: T. caulis extract caused vascular relaxation in a concentration-dependent manner, which was endothelium-independent. To further identify the mechanism, we incubated the arteries in Ca2+-free solution containing high K+, followed by a cumulative administration of CaCl2 (0.01–2.0 mM) with or without T. caulis extract (250 µg/mL). The treatment of T. caulis extract decreased contractile responses induced by the addition of Ca2+, which suggested that the extracellular Ca2+ influx was inhibited by the T. caulis extract. Moreover, an active compound of T. caulis extract, vanillin, also induced vasodilation in mesenteric resistance arteries. Conclusion: T. caulis extract and its active compound, vanillin, concentration-dependently induced vascular relaxation in mesenteric resistance arteries. These results suggest that the administration of T. caulis extract could help decrease blood pressure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products from Medicinal Plants)
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14 pages, 2812 KiB  
Article
Adlay Seed (Coix lacryma-jobi L. var. Ma-yuen Stapf.) Ethanolic Extract Fractions and Subfractions Induce Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Human Breast and Cervical Cancer Cell Lines
by Yi-Fen Chiang, Cheng-Pei Chung, Jing-Hui Lin, Wenchang Chiang, Hsin-Yuan Chen, Mohamed Ali, Yin-Hwa Shih, Kai-Lee Wang, Tsui-Chin Huang, Hsin-Yi Chang, Li-Chun Lin, Tzong-Ming Shieh and Shih-Min Hsia
Molecules 2022, 27(13), 3984; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27133984 - 21 Jun 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2300
Abstract
The antitumor effects of Coix lacryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf. (adlay seed) ethanolic extract have been increasingly shown. This study aimed to investigate the beneficial effects of both the fractions and subfractions of adlay seed ethanolic extract on the human breast (MCF-7) and [...] Read more.
The antitumor effects of Coix lacryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf. (adlay seed) ethanolic extract have been increasingly shown. This study aimed to investigate the beneficial effects of both the fractions and subfractions of adlay seed ethanolic extract on the human breast (MCF-7) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cell lines, as well as exploring their possible mechanisms of action. The ethanolic extracts were obtained from different parts of adlay seed, including AHE (adlay hull extract), ATE (adlay testa extract), ABE (adlay bran extract) and PAE (polished adlay extract). The results of a 3-(4,5-dimethyl thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl- tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay showed that AHE-Ea and ATE-Ea showed significant growth inhibitory effects in a dose-dependent manner. The results also showed that the AHE-Ea-K, AHE-Ea-L, ATE-Ea-E and ATE-Ea-F subfractions inhibited cell proliferation, induced cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase and decreased CDK4/Cyclin D1 protein expression. Finally, the extract activated caspase-3 activity and PARP protein expression, which induced MCF-7 and HeLa cell apoptosis. We then used liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to identify the potential active components., Quercetin showed an anticancer capacity. In conclusion, the AHE-Ea-K, AHE-Ea-L, ATE-Ea-E and ATE-Ea-F subfractions showed antitumor effects through the inhibition of MCF-7 and HeLa cell line viability, as well as inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products from Medicinal Plants)
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16 pages, 1291 KiB  
Article
Secondary Metabolites with Anti-Inflammatory Activities from an Actinobacteria Herbidospora daliensis
by Jih-Jung Chen, Tzong-Huei Lee and Ming-Jen Cheng
Molecules 2022, 27(6), 1887; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27061887 - 14 Mar 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1776
Abstract
Bioassay-guided fractionation of extracts derived from solid cultures of a Herbidospora daliensis originating from Taiwan led to the isolation of five new compounds, for which we propose the name herbidosporadalins A–E (15), one isolated for the first time, [...] Read more.
Bioassay-guided fractionation of extracts derived from solid cultures of a Herbidospora daliensis originating from Taiwan led to the isolation of five new compounds, for which we propose the name herbidosporadalins A–E (15), one isolated for the first time, herbidosporadalin F (6), together with two known compounds (7 & 8). Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses, including 1D- and 2D-NMR experiments with those of known analogues, and on the basis of HR-EI-MS mass spectrometry, their anti-inflammatory activities were also evaluated. Of these isolates, herbidosporadalin A (1), B (2), F (6) and G (8) showed NO inhibitory activity, with IC50 values of 11.8 ± 0.9, 7.1 ± 2.9, 17.8 ± 1.7, and 13.3 ± 6.5 μM, stronger than the positive control quercetin (IC50 = 36.8 ± 1.3 μM). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on 3,4-seco-friedelane metabolites (5, 6 & 8) from the genus Herbidospora. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products from Medicinal Plants)
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14 pages, 453 KiB  
Article
Novel Antifungal Dimers from the Roots of Taiwania cryptomerioides
by Ming-Jen Cheng, Ming-Der Wu, Chao-Lin Chang, Hsun-Shuo Chang, Chiou-Fung Chyu and Yueh-Hsiung Kuo
Molecules 2022, 27(2), 437; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27020437 - 10 Jan 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1347 | Correction
Abstract
Five new dimer compounds, namely Taiwaniacryptodimers A–E (15), were isolated from the methanol extract of the roots of Taiwania cryptomerioides. Their structures were established by mean of spectroscopic analysis and comparison of NMR data with those of known [...] Read more.
Five new dimer compounds, namely Taiwaniacryptodimers A–E (15), were isolated from the methanol extract of the roots of Taiwania cryptomerioides. Their structures were established by mean of spectroscopic analysis and comparison of NMR data with those of known analogues. Their antifungal activities were also evaluated. Our results indicated that metabolites 1, 2, 4, and 5 displayed moderate antifungal activities against Aspergillus niger, Penicillium italicum, Candida albicans, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products from Medicinal Plants)
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14 pages, 1909 KiB  
Article
Constituents from the Fruiting Bodies of Trametes cubensis and Trametes suaveolens in Vietnam and Their Anti-Inflammatory Bioactivity
by Yue-Chiun Li, Nguyen Thi Ngan, Kun-Ching Cheng, Tsong-Long Hwang, Tran Dinh Thang, Nguyen Ngoc Tuan, Mei-Lin Yang, Ping-Chung Kuo and Tian-Shung Wu
Molecules 2021, 26(23), 7311; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26237311 - 02 Dec 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2795
Abstract
It is reported that various fungi have been used for medicine and edible foods. The tropical Trametes genus is popular and well-known in Vietnam for its health effects and bioactivities. In this study, the fruiting bodies of the edible fungi T. cubensis and [...] Read more.
It is reported that various fungi have been used for medicine and edible foods. The tropical Trametes genus is popular and well-known in Vietnam for its health effects and bioactivities. In this study, the fruiting bodies of the edible fungi T. cubensis and T. suaveolens were collected in Vietnam. The preliminary bioactivity screening data indicated that the methanol extracts of the fruiting bodies of T. cubensis and T. suaveolens displayed significant inhibition of superoxide anion generation and elastase release in human neutrophils. Therefore, the isolation and characterization were performed on these two species by a combination of chromatographic methods and spectrometric analysis. In total, twenty-four compounds were identified, and among these (1–3) were characterized by 1D-, 2D-NMR, and HRMS analytical data. In addition, the anti-inflammatory potentials of some purified compounds were examined by the cellular model for the inhibition of superoxide anion generation and elastase release in human neutrophils. Among the isolated compounds, (5,14), and (19) displayed significant anti-inflammatory potential. As the results suggest, the extracts and isolated compounds from T. cubensis and T. suaveolens are potential candidates for the further development of new anti-inflammatory lead drugs or natural healthy foods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products from Medicinal Plants)
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19 pages, 8470 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of the Anticancer Potential of Crude, Irradiated Cerastes cerastes Snake Venom and Propolis Ethanolic Extract & Related Biological Alterations
by Mostafa I. Abdelglil, Sanaa O. Abdallah, Mohamed A. El-Desouky, Mohammad Y. Alfaifi, Serag Eldin I. Elbehairi and Aly F. Mohamed
Molecules 2021, 26(22), 7057; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26227057 - 22 Nov 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1998
Abstract
We aimed to evaluate the anticancer potential of crude venom (CV), γ irradiated Certastes cerastes venom (IRRV), and propolis ethanolic extract (PEE). IRRV showed a higher toxicity than CV, while CV-PEE showed higher toxicity than IRRV and CV against lung [A549] and prostate [...] Read more.
We aimed to evaluate the anticancer potential of crude venom (CV), γ irradiated Certastes cerastes venom (IRRV), and propolis ethanolic extract (PEE). IRRV showed a higher toxicity than CV, while CV-PEE showed higher toxicity than IRRV and CV against lung [A549] and prostate [PC3] cancer cells. Toxicity to [A549] and [PC3] cells was concentration and cell type dependent. In comparison to controls, apoptotic genes showed a significant upregulation of P53 and Casp-3 and a downregulation of Bcl-2. Also, induced elevated DNA accumulation in the [S] phase post PC3 cell treatment with IRRV and CV, as well as a significant DNA accumulation at G2/M phase after IRRV treatment of A549 cells. In contrast, PC3 cells showed a negligible cellular DNA accumulation after PEE treatment. Glutathione reductase [GR] was reduced in case of PC3 and A549 cell treated with IRRV, CV, and PEE compared with its values in untreated cell control. The Malondialdehyde [MDA] values in both cells recorded a significant elevation post IRRV treatment compared to the rest of the treatment regimen and untreated cell control. Similarly, IRRV and CV-PEE mix showed obviously higher reactive oxygen species [ROS] values than PC3 and A549 cell treatments with CV and PEE. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products from Medicinal Plants)
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Review

Jump to: Research

17 pages, 5953 KiB  
Review
A Review of the Research Applications of Centipeda minima
by Jiajun Liu, Wenying Zheng, Yifan He, Wanying Zhang, Zhanhao Luo, Xiaotian Liu, Xingyan Jiang, Fanxin Meng and Liyan Wu
Molecules 2024, 29(1), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules29010108 - 23 Dec 2023
Viewed by 784
Abstract
Centipeda minima is a traditional Chinese medicine with wide applications and diverse pharmacological effects. Scholars have conducted extensive studies on its relevant clinical applications, especially its remarkable efficacy in cancer treatment. This paper thoroughly investigates the chemical composition and identification, pharmacological effects, and [...] Read more.
Centipeda minima is a traditional Chinese medicine with wide applications and diverse pharmacological effects. Scholars have conducted extensive studies on its relevant clinical applications, especially its remarkable efficacy in cancer treatment. This paper thoroughly investigates the chemical composition and identification, pharmacological effects, and toxicity, along with the safety of Centipeda minima, so as to lay the foundation for corresponding clinical applications and product development. Furthermore, as global scholars have conducted extensive research on such clinical applications and made significant progress, the future development and utilization of Centipeda minima’s active ingredients to create novel drugs are of great clinical significance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products from Medicinal Plants)
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19 pages, 2404 KiB  
Review
Traditional Medicinal Plants as a Source of Inspiration for Osteosarcoma Therapy
by Liliya Kazantseva, José Becerra and Leonor Santos-Ruiz
Molecules 2022, 27(15), 5008; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27155008 - 06 Aug 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2535
Abstract
Osteosarcoma is one of the most common types of bone cancers among paediatric patients. Despite the advances made in surgery, chemo-, and radiotherapy, the mortality rate of metastatic osteosarcoma remains unchangeably high. The standard drug combination used to treat this bone cancer has [...] Read more.
Osteosarcoma is one of the most common types of bone cancers among paediatric patients. Despite the advances made in surgery, chemo-, and radiotherapy, the mortality rate of metastatic osteosarcoma remains unchangeably high. The standard drug combination used to treat this bone cancer has remained the same for the last 20 years, and it produces many dangerous side effects. Through history, from ancient to modern times, nature has been a remarkable source of chemical diversity, used to alleviate human disease. The application of modern scientific technology to the study of natural products has identified many specific molecules with anti-cancer properties. This review describes the latest discovered anti-cancer compounds extracted from traditional medicinal plants, with a focus on osteosarcoma research, and on their cellular and molecular mechanisms of action. The presented compounds have proven to kill osteosarcoma cells by interfering with different pathways: apoptosis induction, stimulation of autophagy, generation of reactive oxygen species, etc. This wide variety of cellular targets confer natural products the potential to be used as chemotherapeutic drugs, and also the ability to act as sensitizers in drug combination treatments. The major hindrance for these molecules is low bioavailability. A problem that may be solved by chemical modification or nano-encapsulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products from Medicinal Plants)
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