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Nanodelivery of Food Bioactive Compounds

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 10984

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Riddet Institute, Massey University, Private Bag 11 222, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
Interests: bioactive compounds; phenolic compounds; functional foods; encapsulation; phytochemical delivery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centro de Investigação de Montanha (CIMO) and Laboratório para a Sustentabilidade e Tecnologia em Regiões de Montanha (SusTEC), Instituto Politécnico de Bragança, Campus de Santa Apolónia, 5300-253 Bragança, Portugal
Interests: biobased products; natural functional ingredients and applications; nano and microencapsulation; polyurethane chemistry; hybrid and composite materials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the last couple of decades, there has been a growing research interest in nanodelivery of bioactive ingredients using different techniques and the incorporation of the nanoencapsulated compounds into various food products, known as ‘functional foods’. This includes the delivery of a diverse class of bioactive compounds such as polyphenols, carotenoids, vitamins, minerals, essential oils, and flavours.

This Special Issue of ‘Nanodelivery of food bioactive compounds’ aims to bring together pure and applied research papers on various nanodelivery/nanoencapsulation methods that have been experimented and suggested for the aformentioned broad group of bioactive compounds. Such methods may include emulsification, nanospray drying, coacervation, liposomal/niosomal entrapment, complexation of proteins-polysaccharides, inclusion complexation, encapsulation within solid lipid nanoparticles/nanostructured lipid carriers, etc.

In addition, various nanonanoencapsulated bioactive compounds that have been incorporated into food products (e.g., milk and dairy products, bars, bread, breakfast cereals, meat products, cookies, cakes, juices, oils, and chewing gum) can be published in this Special Issue.

The nanoencapsulation approach provides some potential advantages in improving solubility/dispersibility of the bioactive compounds (particularly, hydrophobic compounds) in food, controlling their release in the gastrointestinal digestive tract, masking their undesirable sensorial properties, improving their chemical stability in food during manufacture and storage, and maintaining their functionality/efficacy in the human body. Therefore, the informaiton on the novel and conventional techniques that have been used for nanodelivery of the aforementioned bioactive compounds and their incorporation into functional food products would enhance the value of this Special Issue to the researchers and other users in this area. This will also be useful for discussing the challenges associated with nanodelivery of bioactive compounds (e.g. potential toxicity), as well as the possible novel approaches for engineering, modification, and overcoming such challenges of the nanoencapsulation systems.

Dr. Ali Rashidinejad
Prof. Dr. Filomena Barreiro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Bioactive compounds
  • Nanodelviery
  • Antioxidant activity
  • Nanoencapsualtion
  • Fucntional foods
  • Food fortification

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 2773 KiB  
Article
Encapsulation of Vitamin B12 by Complex Coacervation of Whey Protein Concentrate–Pectin; Optimization and Characterization
by Neda Akbari, Elham Assadpour, Mohammad Saeed Kharazmi and Seid Mahdi Jafari
Molecules 2022, 27(18), 6130; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27186130 - 19 Sep 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1971
Abstract
Vitamin B12 (VB12) is one of the essential vitamins for the body, which is sensitive to light, heat, oxidizing agents, and acidic and alkaline substances. Therefore, the encapsulation of VB12 can be one of the ways to protect it [...] Read more.
Vitamin B12 (VB12) is one of the essential vitamins for the body, which is sensitive to light, heat, oxidizing agents, and acidic and alkaline substances. Therefore, the encapsulation of VB12 can be one of the ways to protect it against processing and environmental conditions in food. In this work, the influence of pectin concentration (0.5–1% w/v), whey protein concentrate (WPC) level (4–8% w/v) and pH (3–9) on some properties of VB12-loaded pectin–WPC complex carriers was investigated by response surface methodology (RSM). The findings showed that under optimum conditions (1:6.47, pectin:WPC and pH = 6.6), the encapsulation efficiency (EE), stability, viscosity, particle size and solubility of complex carriers were 80.71%, 85.38%, 39.58 mPa·s, 7.07 µm and 65.86%, respectively. Additionally, the formation of complex coacervate was confirmed by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). In addition, it was revealed that the most important factor in VB12 encapsulation was pH; at a pH < isoelectric point of WPC (pH = 3), in comparison with higher pH values (6 and 9), a stronger complex was formed between pectin and WPC, which led to an increase in EE, lightness parameter, particle size and water activity, as well as a decrease in the zeta-potential and porosity of complex carriers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanodelivery of Food Bioactive Compounds)
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13 pages, 1627 KiB  
Article
Water-in-Oil-in-Water Double Emulsions as Protective Carriers for Sambucus nigra L. Coloring Systems
by Liandra G. Teixeira, Stephany Rezende, Ângela Fernandes, Isabel P. Fernandes, Lillian Barros, João C. M. Barreira, Fernanda V. Leimann, Isabel C. F. R. Ferreira and Maria-Filomena Barreiro
Molecules 2022, 27(2), 552; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27020552 - 16 Jan 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2858
Abstract
The use of natural colorants is needed to overcome consumer concerns regarding synthetic food colorants′ safety. However, natural pigments have, in general, poor stability against environmental stresses such as temperature, ionic strength, moisture, light, and pH, among others. In this work, water-in-oil-in-water (W [...] Read more.
The use of natural colorants is needed to overcome consumer concerns regarding synthetic food colorants′ safety. However, natural pigments have, in general, poor stability against environmental stresses such as temperature, ionic strength, moisture, light, and pH, among others. In this work, water-in-oil-in-water (W1/O/W2) emulsions were used as protective carriers to improve color stability of a hydrophilic Sambucus nigra L. extract against pH changes. The chemical system comprised water and corn oil as the aqueous and oil phases, respectively, and polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR), Tween 80, and gum Arabic as stabilizers. The primary emulsion was prepared using a W1/O ratio of 40/60 (v/v). For the secondary emulsion, W1/O/W2, different (W1/O)/W2 ratios were tested with the 50/50 (v/v) formulation presenting the best stability, being selected as the coloring system to test in food matrices of different pH: natural yogurt (pH 4.65), rice drink (pH 6.01), cow milk (pH 6.47), and soy drink (pH 7.92). Compared to the direct use of the extract, the double emulsion solution gave rise to higher color stability with pH change and storage time, as corroborated by visual and statistical analysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanodelivery of Food Bioactive Compounds)
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18 pages, 1821 KiB  
Article
Encapsulation Preserves Antioxidant and Antidiabetic Activities of Cactus Acid Fruit Bioactive Compounds under Simulated Digestion Conditions
by Gabriela Medina-Pérez, José Antonio Estefes-Duarte, Laura N. Afanador-Barajas, Fabián Fernández-Luqueño, Andrea Paloma Zepeda-Velásquez, Melitón Jesús Franco-Fernández, Armando Peláez-Acero and Rafael Germán Campos-Montiel
Molecules 2020, 25(23), 5736; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25235736 - 04 Dec 2020
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 2457
Abstract
Cactus acid fruit (Xoconostle) has been studied due its content of bioactive compounds. Traditional Mexican medicine attributes hypoglycemic, hypocholesterolemic, anti-inflammatory, antiulcerogenic and immunostimulant properties among others. The bioactive compounds contained in xoconostle have shown their ability to inhibit digestive enzymes such as α-amylase [...] Read more.
Cactus acid fruit (Xoconostle) has been studied due its content of bioactive compounds. Traditional Mexican medicine attributes hypoglycemic, hypocholesterolemic, anti-inflammatory, antiulcerogenic and immunostimulant properties among others. The bioactive compounds contained in xoconostle have shown their ability to inhibit digestive enzymes such as α-amylase and α-glucosidase. Unfortunately, polyphenols and antioxidants in general are molecules susceptible to degradation due to storage conditions, (temperature, oxygen and light) or the gastrointestinal tract, which limits its activity and compromises its potential beneficial effect on health. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the stability, antioxidant and antidiabetic activity of encapsulated extract of xoconostle within double emulsions (water-in-oil-in-water) during storage conditions and simulated digestion. Total phenols, flavonoids, betalains, antioxidant activity, α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibition were measured before and after the preparation of double emulsions and during the simulation of digestion. The ED40% (treatment with 40% of xoconostle extract) treatment showed the highest percentage of inhibition of α-glucosidase in all phases of digestion. The inhibitory activity of α-amylase and α-glucosidase related to antidiabetic activity was higher in microencapsulated extracts than the non-encapsulated extracts. These results confirm the viability of encapsulation systems based on double emulsions to encapsulate and protect natural antidiabetic compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanodelivery of Food Bioactive Compounds)
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15 pages, 2067 KiB  
Article
Preparation and Characterization of Inclusion Complexes of β-Cyclodextrin and Phenolics from Wheat Bran by Combination of Experimental and Computational Techniques
by Tuba Simsek, Bakhtiyor Rasulev, Christian Mayer and Senay Simsek
Molecules 2020, 25(18), 4275; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25184275 - 18 Sep 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2489
Abstract
Bitterness often associated with whole wheat products may be related to phenolics in the bran. Cyclodextrins (CDs) are known to form inclusion complexes. The objective was to form inclusion complexes between β-CD and wheat phenolics. Pure phenolic acids (trans-ferulic acid (FA), caffeic [...] Read more.
Bitterness often associated with whole wheat products may be related to phenolics in the bran. Cyclodextrins (CDs) are known to form inclusion complexes. The objective was to form inclusion complexes between β-CD and wheat phenolics. Pure phenolic acids (trans-ferulic acid (FA), caffeic acid (CA), and p-coumaric acid (CO)) and phenolic acids from wheat bran were used to investigate complex formation potential. Complexes were characterized by spectroscopy techniques, and a computational and molecular modeling study was carried out. The relative amount of complex formation between β-CD and wheat bran extract was CA > CO > FA. The phenolic compounds formed inclusion complexes with β-CDs by non-covalent bonds. The quantum-mechanical calculations supported the experimental results. The most stable complex was CO/β-CD complex. The ΔH value for CO/β-CD complex was −11.72 kcal/mol and was about 3 kcal/mol more stable than the other complexes. The QSPR model showed good correlation between binding energy and 1H NMR shift for the H5 signal. This research shows that phenolics and β-CD inclusion complexes could be utilized to improve the perception of whole meal food products since inclusion complexes have the potential to mask the bitter flavor and enhance the stability of the phenolics in wheat bran. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanodelivery of Food Bioactive Compounds)
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