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Fuel Cells in China

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2023) | Viewed by 21220

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
The Key Laboratory of Fuel Cell Technology of Guangdong Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641, China
Interests: sub-exchange membrane fuel cell technology; electrocatalysis; lithium-air battery; lithium-ion battery materials; other batteries: potassium ion batteries, etc.
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Fuel Cell Technology, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641, China
Interests: energy materials including electrocatalysts for HER/OER/ORR and novel porous materials for electrochemical applications; electrochemical devices and engineering including water electrolyzer and proton exchange membrane fuel cells; lithium batteries and solid-state electrolytes
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Marine Science and Engineering, Hainan University, Haikou 570228, China
Interests: electrochemistry; electrocatalysis; sustainable energy; fuel cells
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hydrogen fuel cells, including proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), alkaline fuel cell (AFC), and direct alcohol fuel cell (DAFC), are recognized as one of the most promising clean energy conversion technologies and one of the most important technologies to realize carbon neutral. The practical application of hydrogen fuel cells has been hindered by the high cost and insufficient activity and stability. Developing cost-effective oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) catalysts with enhanced activity and improved stability is decisive for the widespread application of hydrogen fuel cells technologies. Therefore, this Special Issue is dedicated to communications in the form of original research and review articles, which cover electrocatalysis toward ORR and HOR and investigation of membrane electrode assembly (MEA) performance. Authors considering the submission of a review are kindly asked to provide in advance to the guest editor a brief outline of the subject of their work.

Prof. Dr. Shijun Liao
Prof. Dr. Li Du
Prof. Dr. Xinlong Tian
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Oxygen reduction reaction
  • Hydrogen oxidation reaction
  • MEA performance
  • Pt-based catalysts
  • Pd-based catalysts
  • Single-atom catalysts
  • Dual-atom catalysts
  • Transition metal carbides
  • Transition metal nitrides
  • Transition metal oxides

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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19 pages, 8371 KiB  
Article
Nano-Graphene Layer from Facile, Scalable and Eco-Friendly Liquid Phase Exfoliation Strategy as Effective Barrier Layer for High-Performance and Durable Direct Liquid Alcohol Fuel Cells
by Prabhuraj Balakrishnan, Fereshteh Dehghani Sanij, Zhixin Chang, P. K. Leung, Huaneng Su, Lei Xing and Qian Xu
Molecules 2022, 27(9), 3044; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules27093044 - 09 May 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 5814
Abstract
Graphene, in spite of exceptional physio-chemical properties, still faces great limitations in its use and industrial scale-up as highly selective membranes (enhanced ratio of proton conductivity to fuel cross-over) in liquid alcohol fuel cells (LAFCs), due to complexity and high cost of prevailing [...] Read more.
Graphene, in spite of exceptional physio-chemical properties, still faces great limitations in its use and industrial scale-up as highly selective membranes (enhanced ratio of proton conductivity to fuel cross-over) in liquid alcohol fuel cells (LAFCs), due to complexity and high cost of prevailing production methods. To resolve these issues, a facile, low-cost and eco-friendly approach of liquid phase exfoliation (bath sonication) of graphite to obtain graphene and spray depositing the prepared graphene flakes, above anode catalyst layer (near the membrane in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA)) as barrier layer at different weight percentages relative to the base membrane Nafion 115 was utilized in this work. The 5 wt.% nano-graphene layer raises 1 M methanol/oxygen fuel cell power density by 38% to 91 mW·cm−2, compared to standard membrane electrode assembly (MEA) performance of 63 mW·cm−2, owing to less methanol crossover with mild decrease in proton conductivity, showing negligible voltage decays over 20 h of operation at 50 mA·cm−2. Overall, this work opens three prominent favorable prospects: exploring the usage of nano-materials prepared by liquid phase exfoliation approach, their effective usage in ion-transport membrane region of MEA and enhancing fuel cell power performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fuel Cells in China)
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Review

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17 pages, 2889 KiB  
Review
Catalyst-Support Interactions Promoted Acidic Electrochemical Oxygen Evolution Catalysis: A Mini Review
by Zijie Luo, Jia Wang, Wei Zhou and Junsheng Li
Molecules 2023, 28(5), 2262; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules28052262 - 28 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2437
Abstract
In the context of the growing human demand for green secondary energy sources, proton-exchange membrane water electrolysis (PEMWE) is necessary to meet the high-efficiency production of high-purity hydrogen required for proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The development of stable, efficient, and low-cost oxygen [...] Read more.
In the context of the growing human demand for green secondary energy sources, proton-exchange membrane water electrolysis (PEMWE) is necessary to meet the high-efficiency production of high-purity hydrogen required for proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The development of stable, efficient, and low-cost oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts is key to promoting the large-scale application of hydrogen production by PEMWE. At present, precious metals remain irreplaceable in acidic OER catalysis, and loading the support body with precious metal components is undoubtedly an effective strategy to reduce costs. In this review, we will discuss the unique role of common catalyst-support interactions such as Metal-Support Interactions (MSIs), Strong Metal-Support Interactions (SMSIs), Strong Oxide-Support Interactions (SOSIs), and Electron-Metal-Support Interactions (EMSIs) in modulating catalyst structure and performance, thereby promoting the development of high-performance, high-stability, low-cost noble metal-based acidic OER catalysts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fuel Cells in China)
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20 pages, 2613 KiB  
Review
Recent Advances and Perspectives in Lithium−Sulfur Pouch Cells
by Weifeng Zhang, Shulian Li, Aijun Zhou, Huiyu Song, Zhiming Cui and Li Du
Molecules 2021, 26(21), 6341; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26216341 - 20 Oct 2021
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3437
Abstract
Lithium–sulfur batteries (LSBs) are considered one of the most promising candidates for next-generation energy storage owing to their large energy capacity. Tremendous effort has been devoted to overcoming the inherent problems of LSBs to facilitate their commercialization, such as polysulfide shuttling and dendritic [...] Read more.
Lithium–sulfur batteries (LSBs) are considered one of the most promising candidates for next-generation energy storage owing to their large energy capacity. Tremendous effort has been devoted to overcoming the inherent problems of LSBs to facilitate their commercialization, such as polysulfide shuttling and dendritic lithium growth. Pouch cells present additional challenges for LSBs as they require greater electrode active material utilization, a lower electrolyte–sulfur ratio, and more mechanically robust electrode architectures to ensure long-term cycling stability. In this review, the critical challenges facing practical Li–S pouch cells that dictate their energy density and long-term cyclability are summarized. Strategies and perspectives for every major pouch cell component—cathode/anode active materials and electrode construction, separator design, and electrolyte—are discussed with emphasis placed on approaches aimed at improving the reversible electrochemical conversion of sulfur and lithium anode protection for high-energy Li–S pouch cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fuel Cells in China)
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29 pages, 3966 KiB  
Review
Research Progress toward Room Temperature Sodium Sulfur Batteries: A Review
by Yanjie Wang, Yingjie Zhang, Hongyu Cheng, Zhicong Ni, Ying Wang, Guanghui Xia, Xue Li and Xiaoyuan Zeng
Molecules 2021, 26(6), 1535; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules26061535 - 11 Mar 2021
Cited by 29 | Viewed by 8633
Abstract
Lithium metal batteries have achieved large-scale application, but still have limitations such as poor safety performance and high cost, and limited lithium resources limit the production of lithium batteries. The construction of these devices is also hampered by limited lithium supplies. Therefore, it [...] Read more.
Lithium metal batteries have achieved large-scale application, but still have limitations such as poor safety performance and high cost, and limited lithium resources limit the production of lithium batteries. The construction of these devices is also hampered by limited lithium supplies. Therefore, it is particularly important to find alternative metals for lithium replacement. Sodium has the properties of rich in content, low cost and ability to provide high voltage, which makes it an ideal substitute for lithium. Sulfur-based materials have attributes of high energy density, high theoretical specific capacity and are easily oxidized. They may be used as cathodes matched with sodium anodes to form a sodium-sulfur battery. Traditional sodium-sulfur batteries are used at a temperature of about 300 °C. In order to solve problems associated with flammability, explosiveness and energy loss caused by high-temperature use conditions, most research is now focused on the development of room temperature sodium-sulfur batteries. Regardless of safety performance or energy storage performance, room temperature sodium-sulfur batteries have great potential as next-generation secondary batteries. This article summarizes the working principle and existing problems for room temperature sodium-sulfur battery, and summarizes the methods necessary to solve key scientific problems to improve the comprehensive energy storage performance of sodium-sulfur battery from four aspects: cathode, anode, electrolyte and separator. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fuel Cells in China)
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