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Dye Chemistry—In Memory of Prof. Michael R. Detty

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2024) | Viewed by 5525

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Department of Chemistry, Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology, Daejeon, Republic of Korea
Interests: neurodegenerative disease research; synthetic chemistry; reactive oxygen species; molecular probes; photosensitizers; selenium; tellurium; phosphonate
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Mike brought a long and successful career in industrial chemistry (Kodak) to academia (University at Buffalo), where he further prospered as a well-known researcher, educator, departmental chair, and server to the scientific community. He had a real presence and was a gifted instructor. From this professional angle, he is well known for his accomplishments in carving out complete stories for novel fluorophore designs that contain chalcogenide element centers. His important accomplishments in fluorescent dyes, therefore, often involved selenium, tellurium, and sulfur. A chalcogenapyrylium dye paper from 1990 that showed mitochondrial targeting and fluorescence based on the chalcogen oxidation (Detty, M.R. et al. J. Med. Chem. 1990, 33 (4), 1108–1116; doi:10.1021/jm00166a005) helped form a more focused branch of research in our laboratory and helped further my own self-discovery. I find his medicinal chemistry articles deep and complete; they continue to serve as an understated resource for future discovery from our lab. While we are interested in neurodegenerative disease research, his lab was more oriented towards PDT and cancer research. Therefore, he brought a lot of interesting novel compounds into being that have relevance between different applications.

He made it over to Asia in 2015 for an event I chaired at KAIST entitled the “International Organoselenium Minisymposium (2015)”. I feel comfortable saying he went the extra mile in many aspects of life and science. He was always encouraging; the 1-on-1 professional conversations over the years aided me much.

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I want to now invite scientists (in academia, industry, national institutes, etc.) to contribute an article in honor of Mike. I feel he would be happy for the future success of each and every one of you. As an educator and proponent of younger faculty, Mike is deserving of such a Special Issue in his name. If you have a dye-, PDT-, chalcogen-, or fluorescence-related manuscript (or other relevant work) at the ready, please consider contributing to this Special Issue in honor of Mike. I really appreciate your effort and attention, in advance, to help make this proposed Special Issue a reality.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Chemistry.

Prof. Dr. David G. Churchill
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • chalcogen
  • dye
  • fluorophore
  • selenium
  • tellurium
  • reactive oxygen species

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 5627 KiB  
Article
Dyeing of Tussah Silk with Reactive Dyes: Dye Selection, Dyeing Conditions, Dye Fixation Characteristics, and Comparison with Mulberry Silk
by Yingjie Yu and Rencheng Tang
Molecules 2024, 29(5), 1151; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules29051151 - 05 Mar 2024
Viewed by 532
Abstract
Tussah silk is one of the most widely used wild silks. It is usually dyed with acid dyes, despite the shortcoming of poor wet fastness. Reactive dyeing is a good solution to this problem. In our work, sulfatoethylsulfone (SES), sulfatoethylsulfone/monochlorotriazine (SES/MCT), monochlorotriazine (MCT), [...] Read more.
Tussah silk is one of the most widely used wild silks. It is usually dyed with acid dyes, despite the shortcoming of poor wet fastness. Reactive dyeing is a good solution to this problem. In our work, sulfatoethylsulfone (SES), sulfatoethylsulfone/monochlorotriazine (SES/MCT), monochlorotriazine (MCT), and bis(monochlorotriazine) (Bis(MCT)) dyes were used to dye tussah silk. All of these dyes showed lower exhaustion and fixation on tussah silk than on mulberry silk under alkaline conditions. Among them, SES dyes were more applicable, with a fixation of 70–85% (at 4%owf dye) at 90 °C when using sodium bicarbonate as an alkali. SES dyes also showed a rapid fixation speed. The dyeing of tussah silk required lower sodium bicarbonate dosage, the use of more neutral electrolytes, and a higher dye quantity to achieve deep effects compared to mulberry silk. Dyed tussah silk displayed lower apparent color depth and brilliance than dyed mulberry silk. The neutral boiling dyeing of tussah silk with SES dyes exhibited higher exhaustion, higher fixation (82–92% at 4%owf dye), and a slower fixation speed compared with alkaline dyeing. Furthermore, in this dyeing method, SES dyes showed higher and more efficient fixation on tussah silk than on mulberry silk. All dyed tussah silk had excellent color fastness to soaping. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dye Chemistry—In Memory of Prof. Michael R. Detty)
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14 pages, 1596 KiB  
Article
Investigating the Effects of Donors and Alkyne Spacer on the Properties of Donor-Acceptor-Donor Xanthene-Based Dyes
by Ishanka N. Rajapaksha, Jing Wang, Jerzy Leszczynski and Colleen N. Scott
Molecules 2023, 28(13), 4929; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules28134929 - 22 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1236
Abstract
NIR dyes have become popular for many applications, including biosensing and imaging. For this reason, the molecular switch mechanism of the xanthene dyes makes them useful for in vivo detection and imaging of bioanalytes. Our group has been designing NIR xanthene-based dyes by [...] Read more.
NIR dyes have become popular for many applications, including biosensing and imaging. For this reason, the molecular switch mechanism of the xanthene dyes makes them useful for in vivo detection and imaging of bioanalytes. Our group has been designing NIR xanthene-based dyes by the donor-acceptor-donor approach; however, the equilibrium between their opened and closed forms varies depending on the donors and spacer. We synthesized donor-acceptor-donor NIR xanthene-based dyes with an alkyne spacer via the Sonogashira coupling reaction to investigate the effects of the alkyne spacer and the donors on the maximum absorption wavelength and the molecular switching (ring opening) process of the dyes. We evaluated the strength and nature of the donors and the presence and absence of the alkyne spacer on the properties of the dyes. It was shown that the alkyne spacer extended the conjugation of the dyes, leading to absorption wavelengths of longer values compared with the dyes without the alkyne group. In addition, strong charge transfer donors shifted the absorption wavelength towards the NIR region, while donors with strong π-donation resulted in xanthene dyes with a smaller equilibrium constant. DFT/TDDFT calculations corroborated the experimental data in most of the cases. Dye 2 containing the N,N-dimethylaniline group gave contrary results and is being further investigated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dye Chemistry—In Memory of Prof. Michael R. Detty)
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20 pages, 5142 KiB  
Article
The Photodynamic Anticancer and Antibacterial Activity Properties of a Series of meso-Tetraarylchlorin Dyes and Their Sn(IV) Complexes
by Rodah Soy, Balaji Babu, John Mack and Tebello Nyokong
Molecules 2023, 28(10), 4030; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules28104030 - 11 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1433
Abstract
A series of tetraarylchlorins with 3-methoxy-, 4-hydroxy- and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl meso-aryl rings (1-3-Chl) and their Sn(IV) complexes (1-3-SnChl) were synthesized and characterized so that their potential utility as photosensitizer dyes for use in photodynamic therapy [...] Read more.
A series of tetraarylchlorins with 3-methoxy-, 4-hydroxy- and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl meso-aryl rings (1-3-Chl) and their Sn(IV) complexes (1-3-SnChl) were synthesized and characterized so that their potential utility as photosensitizer dyes for use in photodynamic therapy (PDT) and photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) can be assessed. The photophysicochemical properties of the dyes were assessed prior to in vitro PDT activity studies against MCF-7 breast cancer cells through irradiation with Thorlabs 625 or 660 nm LED for 20 min (240 or 280 mW·cm−2). PACT activity studies were performed against both planktonic bacteria and biofilms of Gram-(+) S. aureus and Gram-(−) E. coli upon irradiation with Thorlabs 625 and 660 nm LEDs for 75 min. The heavy atom effect of the Sn(IV) ion results in relatively high singlet oxygen quantum yield values of 0.69−0.71 for 1-3-SnChl. Relatively low IC50 values between 1.1−4.1 and 3.8−9.4 µM were obtained for the 1-3-SnChl series with the Thorlabs 660 and 625 nm LEDs, respectively, during the PDT activity studies. 1-3-SnChl were also found to exhibit significant PACT activity against planktonic S. aureus and E. coli with Log10 reduction values of 7.65 and >3.0, respectively. The results demonstrate that the Sn(IV) complexes of tetraarylchlorins merit further in depth study as photosensitizers in biomedical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dye Chemistry—In Memory of Prof. Michael R. Detty)
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11 pages, 2776 KiB  
Article
Wet-Chemical Synthesis of TiO2/PVDF Membrane for Energy Applications
by Muhammad Saleem, Munirah D. Albaqami, Aboud Ahmed Awadh Bahajjaj, Fahim Ahmed, ElSayed Din, Waqas Ul Arifeen and Shafaqat Ali
Molecules 2023, 28(1), 285; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules28010285 - 29 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1449
Abstract
To satisfy the ever-increasing energy demands, it is of the utmost importance to develop electrochemical materials capable of producing and storing energy in a highly efficient manner. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has recently emerged as a promising choice in this field due [...] Read more.
To satisfy the ever-increasing energy demands, it is of the utmost importance to develop electrochemical materials capable of producing and storing energy in a highly efficient manner. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has recently emerged as a promising choice in this field due to its non-toxicity, low cost, and eco-friendliness, in addition to its porosity, large surface area, good mechanical strength, and remarkable transport properties. Here, we present titanium dioxide nanoplates/polyvinylidene fluoride (TiO2/PVDF) membranes prepared by a straightforward hydrothermal strategy and vacuum filtration process. The as-synthesized TiO2/PVDF membrane was applied for energy storage applications. The fabricated TiO2/PVDF membrane served as the negative electrode for supercapacitors (SCs). The electrochemical properties of a TiO2/PVDF membrane were explored in an aqueous 6 M KOH electrolyte that exhibited good energy storage performance. Precisely, the TiO2/PVDF membrane delivered a high specific capacitance of 283.74 F/g at 1 A/g and maintained capacitance retention of 91% after 8000 cycles. Thanks to the synergistic effect of TiO2 and PVDF, the TiO2/PVDF membrane provided superior electrochemical performance as an electrode for a supercapacitor. These superior properties will likely be used in next-generation energy storage technologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dye Chemistry—In Memory of Prof. Michael R. Detty)
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