Geochemistry, Petrogenesis, and Tectonic Setting of the Mesozoic Magmatism

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Mineral Geochemistry and Geochronology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2023) | Viewed by 2411

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Facultad de Ciencias de la Tierra, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, San Nicolas de los Garza 66451, Mexico
Interests: geochemistry; igneous petrology

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Facultad de Ciencias de la Tierra, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, San Nicolas de los Garza 66451, Mexico
Interests: igneous and metamorphic petrology; geodynamics

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Facultad de Ciencias de la Tierra, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, San Nicolas de los Garza 66451, Mexico
Interests: basin analysis; geochemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Mesozoic (252 to 66 Ma) is a significant geological era marked by magmatic events related to different tectonic settings and distributed worldwide. Some representative examples are described as follows: (a) the main cause of the Permo-Triassic extinction event (~251 Ma) has been linked to an extraordinary carbon dioxide emission by the eruption of the Siberian Traps; (b) the supercontinent Pangea break up occurred through various rift events as the initial step of the Middle Triassic central Atlantic opening (~230 Ma) or the Early-Middle Jurassic Tethys Ocean opening (~175 Ma), (c) rifting along the line of the proto-South Atlantic was accompanied by voluminous tholeiitic flood basalt volcanism in Brazil and Southern Africa (120–130 Ma); (d) during Middle Jurassic to Late Cretaceous, a strongly convergent Cordilleran orogenic belt was developed along the North America western margin. A distinctive feature was the emplacement of batholith-like igneous bodies, accompanied by occasional volcaniclastic deposits; (e) magmatic-arc systems, related to the Nazca plate subduction, were developed along the South America western margin since the Jurassic and during Cretaceous times; (f) the end of the Cretaceous period was marked by magmatic activity throughout the Earth, for example, the Deccan traps (~66.2 Ma) constituted by extensive basaltic plateaus. Several mineralogical, geochemical and isotopic traditional tools, as well as quantitative procedures, have been used to reconstruct the petrogenetic history of the igneous rocks. Thus, petrological studies on magmatism provide valuable information on the conditions of their origin, evolution, tectonic setting, and age, contributing to our understanding of the global geotectonic development and its implications in paleogeography, ore deposits, terrestrial climate, and biota diversity.

This Special Issue aims to collect in single volume information provided by studies on Mesozoic magmatism. Contributions based on works on case studies related to different tectonic settings, as well as on petrologic models using information generated by mathematical or statistical approaches (for example: spatial distribution analysis, intensive parameter evaluation, magmatic process modeling, etc.) are warmly welcome. 

Prof. Dr. Fernando Velasco-Tapia
Prof. Dr. Juan Alonso Ramírez Fernández
Prof. Dr. Uwe Jenchen
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • volcanic rocks
  • plutonic rocks
  • Triassic
  • Jurassic
  • Cretaceous
  • petrology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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0 pages, 10536 KiB  
Article
Zircon U-Pb Ages, Petrogenesis, and Tectono-Magmatic Evolution of Late Jurassic–Early Cretaceous S-Type Granitoid in Wujinshan Area of Northwestern Zhejiang, South China
by Uzair Siddique, Zhijie Zeng, Fangjun Zhang, Muhammad Farhan, Chengliang Wang, Qijun Xia, Xiang Gao, Kunlun Zhang, Qin Gao and Zilong Li
Minerals 2023, 13(9), 1190; https://doi.org/10.3390/min13091190 - 10 Sep 2023
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Abstract
Northwest Zhejiang area (NWZJ) is one of the important parts of the large Qingzhou-Hangzhou mineralized belt in South China formed during the Late Jurassic–Early Cretaceous period. Through the study of zircon LA-ICPMS U-Pb dating, whole-rock geochemistry, and Sr-Nd isotopes for the Wujinshan granitoid [...] Read more.
Northwest Zhejiang area (NWZJ) is one of the important parts of the large Qingzhou-Hangzhou mineralized belt in South China formed during the Late Jurassic–Early Cretaceous period. Through the study of zircon LA-ICPMS U-Pb dating, whole-rock geochemistry, and Sr-Nd isotopes for the Wujinshan granitoid in NWZJ, two distinct S-type granitic rocks of porphyry type granodiorite and granite were identified, and the two ages of 146.4 ± 1.5 Ma for granodiorite porphyry and 141.9 ± 1.4 Ma for granite porphyries were obtained. These rocks exhibited a geochemical affinity for S-type granitoid, and the two magmatic ages indicate that these rocks were intruded in two magmatic pulses. The Late Jurassic granodiorite porphyry showed moderate SiO2 (64.38–67.89 wt.%) with higher K2O + Na2O (6.22–6.78 wt.%), lower K2O/Na2O (0.57–0.96), moderate Zr (170–215 ppm), high Sr (302–475 ppm), and low Mg# (31–32) contents. The Early Cretaceous granite porphyries contained high SiO2 (69.68–74.85 wt.%), variable K2O + Na2O (4.60–6.99), high K2O/Na2O (1.72–23.53), slightly higher Zr (160–255 ppm), variable Sr (25–412 ppm), and very low to intermediate Mg# (13–44). The granodiorites had intermediate ∑REE (149–177 ppm), while granite samples showed moderate to high ∑REE content (147–271 ppm), and both rocks showed negative Eu anomalies (0.18–0.29). We propose that these two rocks were predominantly generated by the partial melting of Mesoproterozoic metamorphic basement and underwent variable degrees of fractionation and evolution. The Late Jurassic granodiorite porphyry was formed by the partial melting of Mesoproterozoic metamorphic basement with slab-derived melts or basaltic lower crust input following fractional crystallization, while the Early Cretaceous granite porphyries were generated by the partial melting of Mesoproterozoic metamorphic basement and crystal fractionation with variable magma mixing and assimilation in the upper crust. Tectonically, the Wujinshan granitoid formed in a volcanic arc setting largely affected by the subduction and slab rollback of the paleo-Pacific Plate. Full article
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21 pages, 10898 KiB  
Article
Zircon U–Pb Geochronology, Geochemistry and Geological Significance of the Santaishan–Yingjiang Ultramafic Rocks in Western Yunnan, China
by Huimin Liu, Yongqing Chen and Zhi Shang
Minerals 2023, 13(4), 536; https://doi.org/10.3390/min13040536 - 12 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1228
Abstract
The study of ultramafic rocks in Western Yunnan is of great significance for an understanding of the tectonic evolution of the Neo-Tethys Ocean. The zircon U–Pb data indicated that the Santaishan serpentinized pyroxene peridotite (SSPP) was formed 186–190 Ma, and the Yingjiang hornblende [...] Read more.
The study of ultramafic rocks in Western Yunnan is of great significance for an understanding of the tectonic evolution of the Neo-Tethys Ocean. The zircon U–Pb data indicated that the Santaishan serpentinized pyroxene peridotite (SSPP) was formed 186–190 Ma, and the Yingjiang hornblende pyroxenite (YHP) was formed 182–183 Ma. The content of MgO in the SSPP is relatively high, but the SiO2, Al2O3, CaO and TiO2 content and ΣREE are low, while the YHP has opposite characteristics. The samples from the SSPP and YHP have similar distribution patterns of trace elements, both being enriched in large ion lithophile elements (LILEs) such as Rb, Ba and Th and depleted in high field strength elements (HFSEs) such as Ti, P and Nb. These characteristics are consistent with the supra-subduction zone (SSZ) type and mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) type of ophiolite in the Bangong–Nujiang suture zone. The SSPP rocks have relatively high (87Sr/86Sr)i ratios (0.7091–0.7131) and positive Hf(t) values (11.2–13.8), with εNd(t) values varying from −1.1 to 9.4. The YHP has relatively low εHf(t) values (3.5 to 6.9), with the Nd–Hf isotopic model ages ranging from 610 to 942 Ma. The signatures of Sr–Nd and Lu–Hf isotopes indicate that the SSPP and YHP were derived from the depleted mantle, and the crustal material in the magma source may have originated from the Neoproterozoic Rodinia supercontinent. In the early Middle Jurassic (190 Ma), the Tengchong Block was in the setting of an active continental margin induced by the subduction of the Bangong–Nujiang Ocean, where the SSZ-type SSPP with ophiolite characteristics was formed. With the continuous subduction of the Bangong–Nujiang Ocean, the slab retreated and induced mantle convection, which resulted in the gradual thinning of the continental crust. Meanwhile, the Yingjiang back-arc basin was formed 183 Ma. Under the influence of the upwelling of the asthenosphere and the mixture of crustal materials, the MORB-type YHP was formed. Full article
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